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Samsung (SSNLF.PK) strengthened its lead as the world's top vendor of mobile phones and of...

Samsung (SSNLF.PK) strengthened its lead as the world's top vendor of mobile phones and of smartphones in Q1, IDC estimates. The South Korean giant increased its market share in the latter category to 32.7% from 28.8 a year earlier and shipped more smartphones than the next four providers combined. Apple's (AAPL) share slipped to 17.3% from 23%. The global cellular phone market grew 4% on year to 418.6M devices, with smartphones outshipping feature phones for the first time.
Comments (24)
  • noidea2
    , contributor
    Comments (52) | Send Message
     
    ScamDung still loosing market share in flagship phones. From Igreed in StockTwits:

     

    http://stks.co/q9yK
    26 Apr 2013, 06:14 AM Reply Like
  • rocback
    , contributor
    Comments (1051) | Send Message
     
    Consumers More Likely To Buy An iPhone The Next Time Around
    BY BRYAN M. WOLFE on Fri April 26th, 2013 apple google ios vs. android iphone 5 iphone 5 survey

     

    If you have an iPhone in your pocket, the odds are you’ll have one there for years to come. A new Yankee Group survey shows that 91 percent of iPhone owners plan on buying a new one. This compares to 76 percent for Android handset owners. The report surveyed 16,000 consumers in the U.S. over the past 12 months.

     

    By 2015, the number of iPhone owners could exceed those who own an Android-based device. Of those surveyed, 50 percent now own an Android handset, while 30 percent use an iPhone.

     

    Of those who plan on buying a new handset in the next six months, 42 percent will choose Apple’s iPhone, while an equal number will choose one with Google’s Android installed.

     

    Of the 24 percent of Android handset users who expect to switch brands the next go around, 18 percent plan on buying an iPhone. Just 6 percent of iPhone owners say that they plan to switch to Android.

     

    According to Yankee Group Vice President Carl Howe:

     

    Think of the Apple and Android ecosystems as two buckets of water. New smartphone buyers — mostly upgrading feature phone owners — fall like rain into the two big buckets about equally, with a smaller number falling into Windows Phone and BlackBerry buckets. However, the Android bucket leaks badly, losing about one in five of all the owners put into it. The Apple bucket leaks only about 7 percent of its contents, so it retains more of the customers that fall into it. The Apple bucket will fill up faster and higher than the Android one, regardless of the fact that the Apple bucket may have had fewer owners in it to begin with.
    26 Apr 2013, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • Kurt Windibank
    , contributor
    Comments (1166) | Send Message
     
    And this has what to do with BBRY?
    26 Apr 2013, 06:54 AM Reply Like
  • Superfly_FR
    , contributor
    Comments (374) | Send Message
     
    Basically :
    AAPL lost (23-17.3) = 5.7 %
    SSNLF gain (32.7-28.8) = 3.9%

     

    5.7-3.9 = 1.8 %
    So, it seems that "others" (can't be more specific) are stealing 1.8% aapl market share. Yet, make your bets: Nok ? BBRY ? both ?
    26 Apr 2013, 07:20 AM Reply Like
  • Humble Eagles
    , contributor
    Comments (1957) | Send Message
     
    This story pretty much outlines the problem:

     

    "Samsung's world-wide smartphone shipment rose 56% to a record 69.4 million units in the quarter, while Apple's shipment grew 7% to 37.4 million units, its lowest-ever year-on-year growth rate, the report said."
    http://on.mktw.net/14j...
    26 Apr 2013, 07:40 AM Reply Like
  • Humble Eagles
    , contributor
    Comments (1957) | Send Message
     
    Here is the real problem: that should have been Apple's qtr! This is before the HTC 1 and Galaxy SIV were available.
    26 Apr 2013, 07:42 AM Reply Like
  • milehr
    , contributor
    Comments (509) | Send Message
     
    This is going to change, as the world market matures. Meanwhile, in the US Apple is increasing its lead. Among all smartphones sold in the US between November of last year and February this year Apple's share was 85%.
    26 Apr 2013, 08:29 AM Reply Like
  • Stock Market Mike
    , contributor
    Comments (2367) | Send Message
     
    How long will it take for the world market to mature? In the meantime, 85% of the US market doesn't leave much market share to claim - just a lot to lose.

     

    I look like it this way: Even if NOK and BBRY do poorer than expected, their share prices will probably go up. You can't say that about AAPL. This seems to be confirmed (so far) by the disappointing NOK results just released. It sent NOK from $3.60 to $3.05, but now they're back up to $3.30 and rising. Expectations for NOK are so low, as long as Lumia sales keep gaining, even huge disappointments like -27% feature phone sales growth resulted in barely a dent. NOK is reported to have only sold 400k lumia phones in the US in that quarter? (might be rumour) If true, they have a LOT of upside potential, and need to start marketing and pushing their new devices.
    26 Apr 2013, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • Doyle3000
    , contributor
    Comments (1458) | Send Message
     
    As an AAPL long, I am very concerned that "fall" could be a little late to recapture market share with the imminent launch of the newest Galaxy, which is heavily marketed (5 page ad in USA Today on Wednesday) and is loaded with features and a very nice screen.

     

    URGENCY TIM, URGENCY
    26 Apr 2013, 08:40 AM Reply Like
  • Stock Market Mike
    , contributor
    Comments (2367) | Send Message
     
    Agreed. Although I think AAPL will do fine over the long term, I am very concerned about what its share price will do over the next few months (and perhaps years) as it gets there. The whole smartphone industry is becoming fiercely competitive, with each smartphone having its own plusses and niches, which could expand to significant percentages of market share. NOK's have superior cameras, BBRY's have superior messaging/communication with its hub, AAPL's have the best apps available, and Samsung's are the best marketed and best quality Android devices out there. They also corner many different pricepoints.

     

    With MSFT setting its sights on phones, and BBRY's livelihood depending on it, don't count NOK and BBRY out of the race. Even if they never surpass AAPL in volume, they're going to fight hard to carve out profitable niche ecosystems.
    26 Apr 2013, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • $vix
    , contributor
    Comments (490) | Send Message
     
    I have not spoken to one iPhone 5 user who is wishing for a bigger screen or Phone. The iPhone is such a wonderful device to use with little to no issues. Apple's ecosystem, user experience, Siri, imessage, facetime cannot all be replicated within Samsung and android. Apple products are beautifully executed and their whole user experience and the way information and images are represented on their ipads keeps me coming back.
    The stock price has been the result of hedge fund manipulation, not the result of shoddy products. Sadly, however, even though apple has stable of superior products, it seems the hedge funds will only take interest in aapl stock if apple comes out with another game changer.
    26 Apr 2013, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • mman
    , contributor
    Comments (52) | Send Message
     
    I want bigger screen, I want to get rid of home button (that thoughts come to me after iPhone 4, not after Z10 release). I want more customization, I want easy quick setting access, I want normal message center, not dissappearing one, I want more and cool stuff.

     

    Nothing here is in iPhone 5, they deserve what had happened.
    26 Apr 2013, 06:58 PM Reply Like
  • Jack Baker
    , contributor
    Comments (904) | Send Message
     
    Meaningless. AAPL makes 72% of all global smartphone profits with less than 20% market share......enough said.
    26 Apr 2013, 09:23 AM Reply Like
  • gwynfryn
    , contributor
    Comments (4445) | Send Message
     
    Can anyone provide a definitive description of "smartphone" and feature phone"? Given how the low end Android devices are priced @ the same as such impressive phones as the new Nokia Asha line, isn't the distinction getting a little blurred?
    26 Apr 2013, 09:52 AM Reply Like
  • wrscomncents
    , contributor
    Comments (661) | Send Message
     
    gwy, I asked the same question in a another post and received no response. So I searched it for myself and found the link below. Hope it helps.

     

    http://bit.ly/ZMtC4y
    26 Apr 2013, 10:12 AM Reply Like
  • Superfly_FR
    , contributor
    Comments (374) | Send Message
     
    In very short.
    feature phone = phone + sms + "non graphic apps" (and poor processing power / Storage capabilities)
    smartphone = phone + sms + "all internet related (mail, web, social)" + graphic apps (+ high proc./display/storage cap.)
    26 Apr 2013, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • gwynfryn
    , contributor
    Comments (4445) | Send Message
     
    Thanks guys! If the new Ashas can surf, then that makes them more than "feature" phones then?
    26 Apr 2013, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • wrscomncents
    , contributor
    Comments (661) | Send Message
     
    According to this explanation although you can surf with an Asha it is still considered a feature phone. Although they are very close to smartphones.

     

    http://nokia.ly/17mOEsJ
    26 Apr 2013, 12:06 PM Reply Like
  • wrscomncents
    , contributor
    Comments (661) | Send Message
     
    By the way, this is exactly the type of phone I would love to purchase if sprint would only offer it.
    26 Apr 2013, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • Seppo Sahrakorpi
    , contributor
    Comments (2002) | Send Message
     
    I see that there are basically two incompatible definitions for defining feature phones vs smartphones. One is using the end-user facing functionality and the other is based on backend OS level capability. Using the former definition, Asha's (for all practical purposes) are smartphones, using the latter they are not.
    26 Apr 2013, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • wrscomncents
    , contributor
    Comments (661) | Send Message
     
    I agree. In my opinion the Asha is a low powered (absent a better term) smartphone. It gets confusing. Apparently the Asha was considered a feature phone in their last earnings report.
    26 Apr 2013, 12:26 PM Reply Like
  • Seppo Sahrakorpi
    , contributor
    Comments (2002) | Send Message
     
    It is very confusing.

     

    Nokia uses the following structure and terminology for mobile devices:

     

    * Devices & Services Unit
    ** Mobile Devices
    *** Mobile Phones
    **** Includes feature phones, and Asha devices
    *** Smart Devices
    **** Includes Lumia and Symbian devices

     

    Independently of the above (financial accounting based structure), Nokia also uses the term 'smartphone', which means Lumia, Symbian, AND Asha.

     

    See e.g. the latest Q report...
    26 Apr 2013, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • gwynfryn
    , contributor
    Comments (4445) | Send Message
     
    Good link wrs! As I now see it, the more recent "feature" phones do everything I'd want to do on a phone, but if I want to pay ten times as much, I can get a similarly sized device that will also let me do things I'd really much rather do on a full sized computer...

     

    When value for money matters (as it does to me at present) then it's really no contest; "feature" phones win, hands down! If I ever have money to burn (as I hope will be the case, in the not too distant future) will I buy the current equivalent of today's (admittedly desirable) Z10? I rather suspect that I'd instead stump for an Ultrabook (especially if a QNX version is available) but then, for me, failing eyesight is an issue.

     

    Conclusion: if more people saw things as I do, then Nokia really should be pushing their Asha line more, to snag the sensible money of a potentially much greater market, but we live in a world where a minority have most of the money, so much so that, "value for money" becomes supplanted by "must have the latest gadget", and this is where the easy profit is to be found, at least for the short term, so it's a tough call for the companies involved, isn't it?
    27 Apr 2013, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • gwynfryn
    , contributor
    Comments (4445) | Send Message
     
    It boils down to how many of their (oops!) features you'd actually want to use on something phone sized, so check out the spec, and forget about labels! I'm with you, wrs; the Ashas fits the bill, and there's no way I could justify paying the premium for a Lumia, even if I could afford one...
    27 Apr 2013, 10:03 AM Reply Like
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