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Electoral politics continue to threaten the Keystone pipeline (TRP) that would deliver jobs to...

Electoral politics continue to threaten the Keystone pipeline (TRP) that would deliver jobs to the Midwest as well as 700K barrels/day of crude from Alberta oil sands to Gulf Coast refineries. Canadian PM Harper, after seeing the President at the G-20, says Obama remains "noncommittal" to the project. ([[previous]])
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Comments (21)
  • Lint
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    Obama being noncommittal about providing this country with greater resources? shocking!
    4 Nov 2011, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • Terry330
    , contributor
    Comments (870) | Send Message
     
    Safe drinking water is more important than $2.95 gasoline.
    4 Nov 2011, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • Lint
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    The next time you fill your vehicle up with fuel, you should be aware that you are contributing to possible unsafe drinking water. Or when you turn on your lights. Or when you turn on your heat. Or as you use a computer made of plastics and run by electricity.

     

    Nit-wit.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:17 PM Reply Like
  • Terry330
    , contributor
    Comments (870) | Send Message
     
    When you sacrifice public health for profit, you will lose in the end. We need to be focused on innovating new, cleaner, energy resources rather than putting any energy into arguing about oil. It is the energy of the past.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • Lint
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    So sell your car, home, computer and all manufactured goods pronto or you'll look like another hypocrite. But wait, let me guess...you didn't actually mean YOU should sacrifice, right?
    4 Nov 2011, 12:43 PM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    Terry, if oil is the "energy of the past" what will replace it? In my view there is nothing on the horizon that is even close. Keep in mind trains, trucks, planes, ships, and heavy equipment cannot run on batteries.

     

    Biofuels may be the closest thing, but they are still a long way off.

     

    Maybe you should spend your time "innovating new, cleaner, energy resources" rather than arguing endlessly on irrelevant internet forums.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:48 PM Reply Like
  • Lint
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    In order to respond, Terry would have to acknowledge the laws of thermodynamics (there is no energy storage as efficient as oil today) as well as the economics of the supply chain.

     

    Terry talks out of his tail.
    4 Nov 2011, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    Hard to call it "electoral politics". The pipeline is a dumb idea. It is pumping dirty shale oil over a key aquifer. Any jobs would be entirely temporary and the potential pollution could be with us a LONG time.
    4 Nov 2011, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • Lint
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    And your septic or sewer lines pump your dirty water right out of your house. And the gas you use daily? Or the electricity that you can afford to run your home? How have you survived this long?

     

    Nit-wit.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    You guys do realize that there are pipelines literally ALL over the country right? And I have never been poisoned by drinking tap water....
    and I think this keystone pipeline is basically an expansion of an existing system. Should we just shut them all down?
    4 Nov 2011, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • Larry Smith
    , contributor
    Comments (2731) | Send Message
     
    They are developing the oil whether the US buys it or not. No oil is going to be "pumped' into a key aquifer. Jobs (over 10,000) would last for years and some longer than that as the pipeline would have to be maintained. Federal and State Governments would gain much needed income through taxes and fees. Pipeline would provide enough oil that we could cut back on oil from Venezuela and/or the Middle East. Pipelines are much safer than ocean going tankers. Pipelines run all over this country including under and through water resources.

     

    I suppose giving money to some green energy company that is going to go under is a better idea than building a pipeline that will create jobs and revenue for the States and Feds.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    "I suppose giving money to some green energy company that is going to go under is a better idea than building a pipeline that will create jobs and revenue"

     

    It's called "investing". There are wind projects up and down the coasts and solar farm projects that COULD generate lots of power, but they are hung up in red-tape. I think we should stop giving Gov't subsidies to oil companies and find inexpensive ways to encourage the private sector to exploit wind and solar resources.
    4 Nov 2011, 04:11 PM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    Oh like Solyndra?
    5 Nov 2011, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    Every single investment YOU ever made was a winner?
    6 Nov 2011, 08:34 AM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    Well I haven't had any epic failures. And my purpose in investing is to make myself richer, not setup political photo ops.
    6 Nov 2011, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    The Gov't has a role to play in long-term strategic assets. For example, the NSF, NIH and others support important research for which the pay off is way in the future-- too "blue-sky" for the private sector.

     

    Solyndra was a mistake, but it went through a pretty rigorous review process. It is unfortunate Chinese "dumping" destroyed their business model. China is the cause of most of the West's misery, in my view. Opening China will go down as Nixon's greatest or second greatest crime (after expanding the Viet Nam war).
    6 Nov 2011, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    I disagree in what the role of government is. It should protect life, liberty and property and do little else.

     

    Also, China is kicking our ass because they are, as a people, stronger than us. Not because of the valuation of their currency or anything else policy related. When the average American wakes up and realizes that success is not going to be handed to him on a silver platter he might be able to compete better globally.
    6 Nov 2011, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    "China is kicking our ass because they are, as a people, stronger than us. "

     

    Fine--- you go work for 6 dollars a day, or whatever they're paying their slaves these days.

     

    "It should protect life, liberty and property and do little else."

     

    I thought you were just defending China, where private individuals are not allowed to own property. BTW: what does protecting life, liberty, and property mean in the modern world? Providing for national defense? I'd say in the 21st century it means safe airplanes, safe food and drugs, clean air and water, protection from rogue nations with predatory trade policies.
    6 Nov 2011, 09:36 PM Reply Like
  • bigbenorr
    , contributor
    Comments (891) | Send Message
     
    I didn't defend the chinese government, they are terrible. So are most others in the world, my point was that Chinese people are extremely hard working, and they do have property rights, true they are poorly protected, but there are plenty of chinese making money and doing well. I met a Chinese engineer at a company I worked at who started his own business over there so I know it is possible. Like it or not they produce a ton of high quality goods for a low cost and that is why they are winning the trade battle. All this talk of "predatory policies" sounds alot like whining to me.

     

    As for the role of government, I should clarify my position. I think government should protect my property from being stolen or destroyed, me from being killed, and keep my freedom from being infringed upon. That includes my freedom to make my own decisions about the planes I fly on, the food I eat, the water I drink and which "rogue nations" I do business with. As for the military, yes it is necessary but only for defense, not building an empire and controlling the world.
    6 Nov 2011, 11:07 PM Reply Like
  • Tom B
    , contributor
    Comments (3624) | Send Message
     
    The big trouble with starting a business in the US isn't lack of gumption or Gov't regulation; it's tight capital markets.

     

    Not so in China where the Gov't basically owns everything (not to recommend such an arrangement).
    7 Nov 2011, 12:28 PM Reply Like
  • Tony Petroski
    , contributor
    Comments (6368) | Send Message
     
    Reuters reports that the members of the G-20 agreed to hold their next conference in Edmonton this February. Sources close to the policymakers involved quoted one off the record as saying "we're getting tired of this fattening French food. Cannes and Paris are getting old. We'd like to see how things work in some up-and-coming places."

     

    The meeting broke up with an agreement for all involved to continue their efforts to reduce the carbon footprints of their respective countries and do what they can to lower the level of the seven seas. The heads of state then got in their private jumbo jets with their entourages in tow anxious to get back home and continue the work of denouncing fatcat private-jet owners.
    4 Nov 2011, 12:31 PM Reply Like
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