Apple (AAPL +1.3%) roundup: 1) Moody's estimates Apple's debt offering will save the company...


Apple (AAPL +1.3%) roundup: 1) Moody's estimates Apple's debt offering will save the company $9.2B in tax payments that would have to be made if offshore cash was used to finance planned buybacks. 2) TSMC (TSM -0.3%) will reportedly manufacture the app processor for an iPhone due in 2H14 (the iPhone 6?), but Samsung will manufacture the iPhone 5S' processor (previous). 3) Apple has filed patent applications for curved battery designs - could they be used in more flexible iOS hardware? 4) Regional carrier U.S. Cellular (USM -2.9%) plans to finally sell the iPhone.

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Comments (8)
  • rocback
    , contributor
    Comments (1098) | Send Message
     
    I noticed Mr. Eassa hasnt posted a negative Apple article in the last 11 days. Thats surprising since he posted 9 negative articles in a row in about a month. I wonder if it's because Apples stock is up since his negative articles. :-)
    3 May 2013, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • madbcolumbus
    , contributor
    Comments (172) | Send Message
     
    Well said roc! All the other bears are pretty quiet as well. Buy back seems to really eliminate the volatility on aapl.
    3 May 2013, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • chopchop0
    , contributor
    Comments (5200) | Send Message
     
    Yet at the end of all of this, who is AAPL going back to for their components? Why yes, SAMSUNG!
    3 May 2013, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • SP5524
    , contributor
    Comments (86) | Send Message
     
    Isn't he an undergrad too? He's probably busy taking exams. I remember how much more I knew about the world when I was in college. Wait, no. its the complete opposite.
    3 May 2013, 02:27 PM Reply Like
  • rocback
    , contributor
    Comments (1098) | Send Message
     
    Samsung should stick to components. Their new phone is so flimsy it breaks too easily according the Square tests:
    SquareTrade gave the Galaxy S IV a score of seven based on drop and water tests. The worse possible score is a 10. By contrast, the Galaxy S III received a 6.5 when it first arrived in 2012. Meanwhile, Apple’s iPhone 5 scored a five.

     

    As a result, SquareTrade predicts that one in five Americans will buy Samsung’s newest phone this year. Of those, one in four will break it within the first 12 months. This translates into 6 million broken handsets in 2013.

     

    In a statement, SquareTrade concludes:

     

    While the S4 proved slightly more water resistant than its predecessor the S3, Samsung’s new Galaxy phone actually performed worse in most other categories.
    3 May 2013, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • chopchop0
    , contributor
    Comments (5200) | Send Message
     
    I guess Samsung expects their phones to be used by Adults, not toddlers or Gorillas. I am ok with that ;)

     

    Besides, who spends hundreds on a phone and doesn't buy a $30 protective case?

     

    Samsung manufactures the screens and processors for AAPL because no one else does it better. AAPL tried to go with LG and Sharp last year for the retina display and that's where quality issues started coming up. At the end of the day, they had to come back to Samsung.
    3 May 2013, 02:45 PM Reply Like
  • rocback
    , contributor
    Comments (1098) | Send Message
     
    I see the Korean Jr High let out early today. Samsung shills at it again.

     

    Samsung Admits to Paying Students to Trash Other Smartphones

     

    http://bit.ly/166eTpv
    3 May 2013, 03:19 PM Reply Like
  • Sam Liu
    , contributor
    Comments (3711) | Send Message
     
    If the Contrafund was divesting AAPL, are you questioning the wisdom of the Contrafund's management?

     

    Afterall this is not the time of the year to take mutual fund losses.
    3 May 2013, 03:28 PM Reply Like
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