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  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    Am I right in my understanding that a high-temp fuel cell, like $FCEL makes, can also run on ammonia (NH3)? (Same reformation effect at the high temps)
    Aug 2 10:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    I like to think that we will be able to taper off using oil for fuel and save the rest of it for "higher" uses like plastics and fertilizers, etc.
    Aug 2 10:46 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    Philohipis,
    Well, we could start by ending the government's subsidies to th efossil fuel industry. But their lobbying arm is so powerful and well-funded that there is little chance of actually accomplishing that.
    But my point is that companies like Bloom would have a more reasonable chance of becoming profitable if the playing field were leveled.
    Aug 1 05:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    Philohipis,
    Thanks for the heads-up but does a company have to be profitable to be embraced by the market? I think most of the companies in the H2/FC sector that have gone public came onto the market before being profitable. But if Bloom were both innovative and profitable, I agree, that would make their stock price soar! Eager to hear more on Bloom as we all (on this blog) discover more info...
    Jul 31 03:48 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    I agree, Bloom Energy appears to have huge potential. Also eager for the IPO, will it be in 2014?
    Jul 31 02:37 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    Jerrydd,

    Sorry, not sure what you are asking as your first question?

    Some FC manufacturers may be developing home units but I think you know that $PLUG makes fuel cell power units to provide power for electric equipment like forklifts. Nothing in the home market at this time.

    Musk is actually not correct in his estimation of fuel cells for cars. All the majors will have fuel cells vehicles on the road in 2015, Hyundai already does. They would not be doing this if it did not make sense. Costs will go down as the technology evolves, as will the cost of hydrogen. We know the cost of gasoline will only go up.

    I am not sure where you got the idea that EVs will be more cost effective in a few years. I think it will go the other way, FC vehicles will become more cost effective and they will remain quick to "charge" since you are just filling up a tank of hydrogen.

    I am sure there is an internal debate about fuel cells at Tesla. Musk's disdain for them is based on his emotional and monetary investment in battery technology. But all the same, I hope he will eventually see the value in having an on-board charger that runs on hydrogen (a range extender) as an option for Tesla owners that want to hit the open road and go farther than they can on full battery charge.
    Jul 30 03:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    NatGas will be providing feedstock for H2 for quite a while, there is so much NatGas and it is cheap and the process is well established to make H2. All the industrial gas companies already do a lot of it (steam reformation) and have invested in the equipment. Carbon sequestration of the CO2 byproduct of steam reformation is not out of the question but does add expense.

    But electrolysis of H2O as the sole source of the H2 we will be using in the future is the holy grail of a perfect hydrogen energy system. Creating zero carbon emissions while producing all the H2 we need from water.

    Nuclear powered electrolysis is certainly an option. If we can get nuclear power established again, there is also a process which uses the waste heat of the reaction to dissociate water into H2 and O. Getting the public to accept nuclear power again (even though they are rejecting technology that is 30 years old and may not have been properly sited) is going to be an uphill battle.

    But there are other sources of non-carbon electricity. Geothermal energy is one of the most promising, I think. Iceland has very low cost electricity because they have no fuel costs. The earth's hot lava comes close to the surface in Iceland, just as it does in Hawaii. In Hawaii, there is resistance to using heat from the lava to make electricity because it offends traditional culture and their reverence for Pele, the god of fire. But people may relax on that issue over time.

    Here is a page about Iceland's hydrogen energy program (kind of on hold now as their economy recovers): http://bit.ly/1AyXOBH
    Jul 30 12:13 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    Hey Philohipis!

    Nice to "see" you here too.

    Yes, I am interested in $GE, great company. The news of their foray into fuel cells ("fool" cells according to the omniscient Elon Musk -- shall we dance with Tesla too?) prompted me to tune in to the banter on SA about them.

    As you know, I think $FCEL is a much more likely take-over target for $GE than $PLUG but it is totally possible that they could gobble up both. You probably know that $GE originally had a significant stake in PLUG. I think GE's presence was, at least in part, responsible for the huge spike in stock value you see at the beginning of $PLUG graph/history.

    So yes, while they pulled the "plug" on $PLUG back then, probably to avoid what they thought could be a black hole of R&D costs to come up with a product, now that the $PLUG engineering team has figured it all out and has a working product, $GE could very well want to pick up that asset again.

    I would not mind owning $GE at all. You may also be aware of another solid company in GE's league that pays a dividend (annual): Siemens AG. I also plan to invest heavily with them. I like their focus on alternative energy, embracing the need to power our society with carbon-free energy.

    Good luck with your campaign for $GE to acquire $PLUG. Do you know people in high places? They are notoriously hard to connect with for the uninitiated (that includes me).

    I have a campaign too. Mine is see $PLUG Range Extenders as an option in Tesla cars. Care to join me?
    Jul 29 05:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric's Game-Changing Fuel Cell May Spark A Revolution [View article]
    David,

    Thanks for what I think is a mostly accurate good article. I say "mostly accurate" because one point you made is not accurate. In one section you mention that fuel cells have been the holy grail of energy for quite a while. This is true. But you also say the automobile manufacturers have been trying but failing to commercialize it. You obviously thought this was a safe assumption but it wasn't. The car companies are having good success commercializing the technology. Hyundai, Honda, Toyota, Mercedes, and GM all have fuel cell vehicles coming onto the market in 2015. Honda has already had its Clarity on the market (in the Los Angeles area only) for a couple of years. Here's the Clarity web site:
    http://bit.ly/Apsaf3

    With one non-fact in the article, it makes me wonder how many other points are assumptions, perhaps inaccurate, rather than facts. But thanks, this is an exciting breakthrough.
    Jul 29 11:17 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Philohipis,
    I listed to part of their live webcast but had to get back to work before the vote on authorizing the additional shares. But you can hear it via the recorded webcast on their web site:
    http://bit.ly/Oy6jaA
    I still don't know if the shareholders voted to authorize more shares or not...
    Jul 25 03:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Have not heard that, do you remember where you saw it? I think $PLUG will be in that range at some point (unless acquired by a bigger company first). When the price will be flirting with $25 per share is anyone's guess, I would say not before fall 2016 (just an intuitive guess). FYI, this stock and this technology also has some powerful foes. People who make batteries or are invested in them, for example, or people who want the technology to fail for various reasons of their own. There is also a very high level of short positions in $PLUG. But that could change soon if it keeps going up and shorts are forced to pay up and bail out.
    Jul 25 02:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Ah, now all is clear. I have asked SA if the comment goes away as soon as someone clicks that link or if there is review by SA before they remove it.
    Jul 24 10:17 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Oh, I see what you mean, under each comment there is a "Report Abuse" link. Anyone can click that and report a comment as abusive. So, assuming the author feels abused, he is probably the one clicking that link and reporting the comment?
    Jul 24 09:24 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Thanks, this helps me understand how it works. So if you take a short position and the stock price falls, you can keep holding the position and not pay taxes as long as you don't cover the position (which would pay out the gain that would be taxed).
    But if you took a short position and the stock went up, you have to keep putting up cash to back up the position? What if it exceeds the value of your assets?
    Jul 24 09:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Plug Power Still A Good Buy? [View article]
    Philohipis,

    Thanks for pointing out the post below.

    I agree that GE's new presence in the fuel cell arena presents some interesting possibilities. Their proximity to Latham does too.

    But I believe GE is working on solid oxide fuel cells (larger than $PLUG fuel cells, grid-scale, run at high temps, can "burn" natural gas, bio-gas, ammonia too [I think], great for CHP projects where very high efficiencies can be achieved) like $FCEL makes. So it is possible FCEL might be acquired to gain patents, know-how, and customers for the new product line at GE.

    That said, I am very interested to learn more about the GE fuel cell/reformer technology you mention, do you have any links you could share?

    So, while anything is possible, I think it is more likely that GE would seriously consider acquiring $FCEL at this point.
    Jul 24 09:06 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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