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rhgordon3505

rhgordon3505
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  • Look for any piece of news that smacks of an improving economy to send stocks falling next week, warns CNBC's Jim Cramer. Why? Big money investors will interpret any positive economic signs as a signal that the Fed is about to pull back economic stimulus rather than risk runaway inflation. Still, he says, there may be opportunities in the pullback, particularly in the bank, tech and industrial spaces. Just says away from anything with a higher yield, like utilities and MLP's. [View news story]
    cramer could never be a one-handed stock tout because he would never be able to "on the one hand...but then again, on the other..."
    May 31 08:04 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Bright Horizons Family Solutions (BFAM +4.1%) gets a lift from an initiation at Jefferies. Dan Dolev starts the shares at Buy with a $41 price target citing expectations of accelerating "healthcare costs, international expansion, cross-selling, and capacity utilization." [View news story]
    great company, great business model, don't know about the equity valuation. the key to the company, and why it's growing much faster than industry peers, is that there business focus is on opening and operating centers in partnership with corporate clients, and in the client's facility. This provides BFAM with a built-in, extremely low-turnover clientele, prepayment of fees and a revenue stream not dependent on walk-in, pay-as-you-go volume.

    not sure of the healthcare angle except somewhat obliquely, the assumption being that rising healthcare costs are one factor that continues to drive the need for two-earner families needing child care facilities.
    May 30 10:50 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Maybe it’s no coincidence gold’s massive selloff is taking place on the same day U.S. tax returns are due, Marketfield's Michael Shaoul surmises, pointing to the need to raise cash to pay substantial capital gains due at tax filing. If sellers waited until the last day, it might have sparked selling pressure to plunge through key support at $1520; at that point, "a substantial wave of panicky selling was always likely to take place." [View news story]
    to whaddayamean?:

    please find a day job.
    Apr 15 01:36 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Maybe it’s no coincidence gold’s massive selloff is taking place on the same day U.S. tax returns are due, Marketfield's Michael Shaoul surmises, pointing to the need to raise cash to pay substantial capital gains due at tax filing. If sellers waited until the last day, it might have sparked selling pressure to plunge through key support at $1520; at that point, "a substantial wave of panicky selling was always likely to take place." [View news story]
    how stupid is that comment? if you sold gold today, and even if you sold it on friday, you still would not have the cash in your account with which to pay the IRS or anybody for anything.

    who writes this garbage?
    Apr 15 11:53 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Fisker Automotive, the struggling government-backed hybrid sports car maker, terminates 75% of its staff in what sources said was a last-ditch effort to conserve cash and stave off a potential bankruptcy filing. The company, which raised $1.2B from investors and tapped nearly $200M in government loans, has only around $30M in cash remaining. About 160 workers were fired at a Friday morning meeting at its Anaheim, Calif., headquarters, and were told that the company couldn't afford to give them severance payments. [View news story]
    hey kmi:

    read what i wrote...tesla isnt a car company, it's an unproven, start-up technology company is the guise of a car company; a huge obama bust which end up costing taxpayers a ton because the dogmatic liberals in D.C. believe they, and not the market, know how to best allocate capital. of course, the fact that they have absolutely no credentials for making investments or allocating OUR capital doesnt seem to bother them a bit.

    Apr 7 08:55 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Fisker Automotive, the struggling government-backed hybrid sports car maker, terminates 75% of its staff in what sources said was a last-ditch effort to conserve cash and stave off a potential bankruptcy filing. The company, which raised $1.2B from investors and tapped nearly $200M in government loans, has only around $30M in cash remaining. About 160 workers were fired at a Friday morning meeting at its Anaheim, Calif., headquarters, and were told that the company couldn't afford to give them severance payments. [View news story]
    Hey kmi:

    let's deepen our analysis, eh? any u.s. carmaker which received funding from the u.s. to recapitalize is actually MAKING AND SELLING cars that people want? have you followed u.s. auto sales trends? moving back toward the levels achieved prior to the 2007-2008 crash.
    Apr 6 12:16 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wilbur Ross has a message for bond investors: "If the 10-year Treasury reverts back just to its average yield from 2000-2010 [you will lose] 23%." Speaking on CNBC, he says investing in long-dated Treasurys will be a "huge risk" over the next two years. By contrast, Ross says stocks do not seem grossly expensive. [View news story]
    To Anathan Thangavel:

    I do believe your logic is backwards. Ross is EXACTLY on point is encouraging his portfolio companies to borrow as much as they can given the the Fed's maintenance of artificially low rates. The capital market objective is to borrow as much as the market will lend at the lowest (and hopefully) fixed rates you can. It's simply all supply and demand. Increased demand, given a fixed amount of lenders will start to drive up rates; but we remain in a situation where credit buyers still have a positive carry and remain less sensitized to credit quality. when lenders start to become much more quality sensitive, borrowers will have to pay more, it's as simple as that. And, you are right about one thing: when companies start to blow up, the credit windows will either close and/or the cost of borrowing will greatly ratchet up. Human behavior virtually dictates that credit booms and busts will continue...
    Mar 22 11:31 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CalPERS has a near negative 10% return on its $900M in clean technology investments, according to CIO Joseph Dear. "This has been a noble way to lose money," he says. The state's public employee retirees (and those expecting someday to retire) must be thrilled. [View news story]
    this is almost too funny and predictable on which to even comment, but when will public sector investment/pension managers wake up and realize their fiduciary responsibility is to maximize returns and not to use their positions as a test-tube for their public policy advocacy?
    Mar 21 01:25 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Teen-oriented retailers trade weak with negative news out on Lululemon and Kohl's tipping sentiment in the sub-sector. Decliners: American Eagle Outfitters (AEO -2.9%), Abercrombie & Fitch (ANF -3.3%), Aeropostale (AEO -2.9%), Zumiez (ZUMZ -2.7%), The Bucke (BKE -2%), Urban Outfitters (URBN -2%). [View news story]
    Would someone please explain to me how Lululemon's "too sheer" yoga pants problem has any negative implications for ANF, URBN or anyone else?
    Mar 19 12:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Back From The Dead: U.S. Collateralized Loan Obligations (CLO) Market Revival [View article]
    you still miss the point. i'm not speaking of mortgage finance structures or even of structured corporate bond offerings--CDOs and CBOs--i'm speaking of YOUR comments regarding collateralized LOAN obligations--CLOs. my previous comments and observations still stand.
    Feb 5 09:16 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Back From The Dead: U.S. Collateralized Loan Obligations (CLO) Market Revival [View article]
    i dont agree with the comment "back from the dead". while issuance in the 2008-2010 period greatly fell off, it had nothing to do with the performance and quality of legacy CLO structures. the improving economic environment, extremely and historically low corporate default rates and the institutional drive for attractive "risk adjusted" returns in a continuing low rate environment have incredibly fired up the new corporate loan--and CLO--machine.

    do yourself a favor a track the equity return performance of 2006-2007 vintage CLOs. i think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

    but, "back from the dead"? a gross over-statement. and let's not confuse CLOs with CBOs and CDOs.
    Feb 4 04:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • No rocket science here: Nothing drops to the bottom line of consumer confidence numbers like smaller paychecks, and that's what Americans are seeing in 2013 thanks to higher payroll and income taxes. Today's 58.6 read missed expectations by a mile and the outlook for employment fell as well, with those anticipating more jobs declining to 14.3% from 17.9%. The XLY slides 0.8%, the XRT -0.7%[View news story]
    reasonable question...but one to which you should already have the answer.

    the flip side of destroying the value of our currency through highly inflationary tactics is that we at the same time create a huge trade imbalance, given the rising cost of imports. now, if you want an economy that manifestly favors exports over imports, that's fine. but, be ready for currency wars and trade restriction across the global economy. AND, given the the U.S. is a decidedly greater consumer economy than it is a producing economy, we'll just push up prices here even more.

    show me one economy that long thrived by destroying the value of its own money. Sir.
    Feb 2 10:18 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • No rocket science here: Nothing drops to the bottom line of consumer confidence numbers like smaller paychecks, and that's what Americans are seeing in 2013 thanks to higher payroll and income taxes. Today's 58.6 read missed expectations by a mile and the outlook for employment fell as well, with those anticipating more jobs declining to 14.3% from 17.9%. The XLY slides 0.8%, the XRT -0.7%[View news story]
    to WMARKW:

    first, your condescending comments fully display your lack of understanding of economics, money & banking.

    increasing the stock of anything--including currency--would be enormously in the absence of a like amount of demand. i doubt china would take to kindly to having the treasury holdings--even earning the meager interest that they do--exchanged for non-earning cash. Their first reaction would be to stop funding our deficits (remember those?) thereby driving up our cost of borrowing (it's called competing for capital markets allocation), increasing our deficit further and yes, increasing inflation.

    next, china would likely take their unwanted stash of dollars and start buying both commodities and hard assets around the globe, but especially here in the u.s., given the likely impact your idiotic proposal would have on exchange rates. the effect would be the same: scarcer supply of hard assets and commodities and growing inflation which would only reach an equilibrium level when all those dollars you printed are absorbed. a long time from now.

    go back to class.
    Feb 1 08:57 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • No rocket science here: Nothing drops to the bottom line of consumer confidence numbers like smaller paychecks, and that's what Americans are seeing in 2013 thanks to higher payroll and income taxes. Today's 58.6 read missed expectations by a mile and the outlook for employment fell as well, with those anticipating more jobs declining to 14.3% from 17.9%. The XLY slides 0.8%, the XRT -0.7%[View news story]
    sometimes i really can't believe the lack of basic economics.to wit:

    (1) taxes are a TRANSFER of wealth payment from YOU to the government. we need to swiftly take back control of how, when, why and at what levels those transfers occur, or we're cooked;

    (2) and this i cant believe: the notion of the federal government redeeming foreign holdings of treasury securities with currency? are you kidding me? exactly how inflationary do you think THAT will be and how destructive to economy do you think it will be? and then, just keep printing money? go long wheelbarrows and memorize the words "Weimar Republic" and "Argentina".
    Jan 30 09:45 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Fiscal cliff negotiations between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell hit a major snag after Republicans demand use of the "chained CPI" method for calculating entitlement benefits - which would result in lower payments for Social Security beneficiaries. Pres. Obama backed the provision previously, but Democrats now object to including it as part of a scaled-down deal. Updated 5:51 p.m.: The Senate won't vote tonight and will reconvene at 11 a.m. tomorrow, Reid says. [View news story]
    To AllStreets: Since taxes, and always have been, nothing more that a transfer of wealth from those in the private sector to the Feds, they aren't "revenues". The problem isn't the government is an underperformning "business", not generating enough revenue to cover its costs, it's that our government won't and can't control spending...of all types. Get rid of defense-spending waste and understand that an aging, less contributory workforce will no longer support continuously more expensive entitlement programs.
    Dec 30 06:21 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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