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keithfeather

keithfeather
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  • Watch Out for the Silver Bubble [View article]
    Lengthen the timeline to 30+ years, and it looks like copper, gold, and california land is in a bubble. Silver has a ways to go to catch up. Not to say it won't go down in the meanwhile, but to call a return "toward" a rational relationship is a bubble is naive.
    Jan 12 11:26 AM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Winter's Coming for the Boomers: Part 2 [View article]
    Maybe I misunderstood you before. Wasn't the crux of your article that this situation was inevitable? How can individuals be blamed for 80 year cycles?


    On Jul 13 02:30 PM James Quinn wrote:

    > Read the book before you open your trap. Ignorance like yours is
    > why we are in this situation.
    Jul 13 02:35 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • JP Morgan Chase $2 Billion Derivatives Loss Illustrates Toxicity Of Casino-Banking [View article]
    Is it really a hedge if the writer of your CDS does not have the ability to pay off in the event of a loss? That I believe is the fundamental issue at hand. If a large enough loss is actually anticipated, then the survival of the issuing companies requires that the "insurance" not be accessed, usually through some sort of revaluation of the underlying security. Seems like deception at the least.
    May 11 10:09 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Student Debt Bubble [View article]
    Spending huge amounts of money (going to expensive college) without doing an economic analysis (ROI if you will) on the product (college degree) is the problem. Anyone with a student loan problem just can't do math. The borrowing is just an extension of the real problem. Blame yourself if you have student loan debt. Parents need to blame themselves if they gave Johnny their retirement for school without a reasonable expection of a great return.
    Dec 16 04:20 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cap and Trade Would Sink the U.S. Economy [View article]
    Help me out...is CO2 the only gas on our "pollutant list" that is required for life to exist on this planet, or are there others as well?

    At 400 ppm it's disasterous, at 200 ppm, we can't grow enough food for the people already here, and at 0 (bet there are some "caring folks" who think this would be a goal) all life ends.


    On Oct 29 11:49 AM ProLogic wrote:
    > with carbon pollution?
    Oct 29 12:04 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cap and Trade Would Sink the U.S. Economy [View article]
    If man were actually able to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels, and he realized that every 10% reduction in CO2 reduced crop/food production by 10%, at what particular atmospheric concentration would the world be safe from "global warming", and an acceptable number of people in the world be starving? If we got the CO2 level too low, would we institute a tax credit for adding more to the atmosphere?
    Oct 29 11:28 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cap and Trade Would Sink the U.S. Economy [View article]
    Go back to 1979, muzzle Carter on nuclear power moratorium, transition ot 100% nuclear power and all electric power. In lieu of that, start building them now as fast as possible.


    On Oct 29 11:49 AM ProLogic wrote:
    .
    > What would cap-and-trade opponents offer as an alternative to deal
    > with carbon pollution?
    Oct 29 11:56 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Obama's Economic Policies Are Failing [View article]
    If, before bashing drug companies for profiteering, writers would actually look at the return shareholders have received from owning drug company shares over the last 20 years, they might rethink looking for medical cost reductions from those companies.
    Jul 14 09:56 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The World's Most Hated Energy Source [View article]
    burn coal, feed a tree.
    Feb 29 08:13 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cap and Trade Would Sink the U.S. Economy [View article]
    We need more nuclear power for the long term. We need to preserve our high carbon fuels (NG, coal, oil) for transportation fuel only. We need to permit spent fuel reprocessing in the US. We need to permit alternate fuel cycle reactors.


    On Oct 29 12:08 PM ProLogic wrote:

    > @ keithfeather -- We probably do need more nuclear power for the
    > short run.
    >
    > But what will we do with all of that nuclear waste for the long run?
    > This radioactive material takes thousands of years to decay, and
    > the decay product remains highly toxic forever.
    Oct 29 12:14 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cap and Trade Would Sink the U.S. Economy [View article]
    A great tag line for 2012 elections. I was pushing for "send the children home", but I like your's better.


    " We need to drain the swamp."
    Oct 29 11:39 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Bad News: House Prices Are Stabilizing [View article]
    The macro premise is mis-directed. Housing is not a consumable, where the 2.5 to 4.5 year inventory on the market can be worked off by lower prices. The inventory still exists regardless of the transfer price. Builders will recover when the existing inventory is deemed unusable (bad location, poor condition, or destroyed, likely regional), or demand increases to to absorb the inventory ( second home purchases, increase in population). The latter is an ulikely short term situation, making the former the probable outcome, indicating a continuing regional glut and regional recovery for builders.
    Jul 14 08:50 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Real Estate Market Just Hit Rock Bottom [View article]
    lets see, carrying costs of residential real estate? 2% real estate taxes, 1.5% insurance, cost of money 4.5%, and real estate inflation running at 3% or less courtesy of the Fed? Near a bottom? hah. Zero inflation helps those who don't borrow money. Residential hell courtesy of the fed.
    Feb 12 06:16 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Fuel Price Breaking Point [View article]
    Great macro article.
    Mar 7 06:57 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Winter's Coming for the Boomers: Part 2 [View article]
    Business is war, and war is business. Identifying a profitable venture with a probability of success encourages one to pursue the venture, whether that be market share or land and assets. The question might be, by 2025, continuing on the US path, will the US be able to defend its assets against a collaboration of competitors? Will the US have sufficient "partners" willing to risk their own existance to defend its own? Will the US be willing, or indeed be able to recognize, its need to risk its very existance to remain independent?

    Thank you for an interesting read.
    Jul 13 01:51 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
106 Comments
141 Likes