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bargor24

bargor24
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  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    Gee, I love the way you pidgeon hole government income and spending. 100% of taxes go to "SSI, Medicare/Medicade, military and debt service". I believe taxes only supply .60 of every dollar spent. Why is it that NO tax money goes to "extended unemployment, food stamps, government workers, etc".? Wouldn't it be just as real (or nonsensical) to say that almost All tax money goes to "extended unemployment, food stamps, government workers, etc", and that borrowed and printed money pays for most "SSI, Medicare/Medicade, military and debt service"??
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:40 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    "gum'mint employees sucking off the public teat" You see no difference between government dollars going to those who are working (or who have worked and paid into SS) and those who are not working??
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:27 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    Almost all US bonds used to be bought by investors. That means money was taken out of the economy to buy them, then put back into the economy when spent by the government. Now, 80% of US bonds are bought by the Fed. That means PRINTED money bought them, and then spent into the economy. That's how some or much of that printed money found its way into corporate coffers. This constant inflow of new money into the economy is like constantly adding straw to the camel's back. Is the question IF it will break, or WHEN?
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:16 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    Of course it's not the taxpayers, it's the Fed's printing presses.
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:09 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    All the above is true, but when 80% of US treasuries is being bought by printed money, we're not borrowing from ourselves.
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:07 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    Like the guy who turns on the hot water full blast, and 10 seconds later complains that the water is cold.
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:01 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    And just "conversation" about lowering the QE made the market drop over a hundred points the next day.
    Feb 23, 2013. 11:00 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    How can you be so suckered in by government data (read: government lies). No inflation??? 10 razorblades and a can of shaving cream cost me $38 last week. And a plain pastic clipboard cost me $6.25 the week before. Food containers get smaller and smaller as the price goes up. When it comes to public statements the current administration is a Goebbels devotee.
    Feb 23, 2013. 10:56 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    You're looking at a bomb with a burning fuse and shouting, "See! Nothing is happening!" It's hard to understand how you and others can be so blind to the eventual fall of an economy based on unending printing of Monopoly money.
    Feb 23, 2013. 10:50 AM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Bears, We're In A Secular Bull Market [View article]
    How can anyone believe that this incessant, massive, money creation isn't going to make the dollar tank. No paper currency in the history of man has maintained its value when over produced. The dollar itself has lost 96% of its value since 1919, and no one was trying to destroy it - until the past few years. And a devaluating dollar is not going to be able to support the housing, bond, or stock markets
    Feb 23, 2013. 10:44 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The hawks have made some noise, now the doves get their say: QE is providing the economy a "much needed boost" and will be required deep into 2013 H2, says the San Francisco Fed's John Williams. "Unemployment is far too high and inflation is too low ... We need powerful and continuing monetary accommodation." Stocks are bouncing, but just a hair. [View news story]
    I've had many anti-doomsdayers / anti-inflationaries argue that inflation is not going to be an issue because the banks are putting their Fed money back into their Fed accounts. But almost all US bonds used to be bought by investors (money taken out of the economy to buy them, then back into the economy when spent by the government). Now, 80% of US bonds are bought by the Fed. (money PRINTED to buy them, then spent into the economy). This is a constant inflow of new money into the economy, like constantly adding straw to the camel's back. Is the question IF it will break, or WHEN? Has pierrebonbon noticed this?
    Feb 23, 2013. 08:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The hawks have made some noise, now the doves get their say: QE is providing the economy a "much needed boost" and will be required deep into 2013 H2, says the San Francisco Fed's John Williams. "Unemployment is far too high and inflation is too low ... We need powerful and continuing monetary accommodation." Stocks are bouncing, but just a hair. [View news story]
    No, I guess not. Actually, they must have burned or electronically deleted all the QE1, QE2, and QEIn cash. Much of it may be stored in Fed accounts now, but not forever.
    Feb 22, 2013. 08:47 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The hawks have made some noise, now the doves get their say: QE is providing the economy a "much needed boost" and will be required deep into 2013 H2, says the San Francisco Fed's John Williams. "Unemployment is far too high and inflation is too low ... We need powerful and continuing monetary accommodation." Stocks are bouncing, but just a hair. [View news story]
    Growing un- and under- employment cannot change fundamental and basic economic laws: The more there is of something, the less it's worth.
    Feb 21, 2013. 11:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • More from the G-20: Speaking now, IMF chief Lagarde calls the euro's strength a welcome policy development (welcome? EU exports to China are diving). Talk of currency wars is overblown, and she sees no major deviation from the fair value of major currencies. Gold isn't liking all of this feel-good talk, hitting a 6-month low of $1,626/oz. GLD -0.8% premarket. [View news story]
    A weaker yen is good for Japan, and a stronger Euro is good for Europe - like a bunch of seven-year-olds unable to get their lies straight.
    Feb 15, 2013. 09:45 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "We told you so." Seriously? Barron's thumps its chest in the sort of self-congratulatory, bullish article that could give a fan of stocks pause. "If there's a great rotation going on from bonds to stocks, we may be only in the top of the first inning," says Jason Trennert. The 60/40 stocks/bonds mix is out of favor with many institutional investors, notably big college endowments, which now have 27% of assets in stocks vs. 45% a decade ago. [View news story]
    Jeez, maybe you'd like a penny for every who laughed at building in the flood plain along the northeast coast - there's never been a flood in most people's living memory. Sandy WAS different. And this time the economy IS different because there has never been debt like this before, nor has there ever been money manufacturing like this before (except for Germany, Zimbabwe, Brazil). We've turned the hot water on full blast and stepped into the shower, but so far the water is still tepid. We're going to get scalded.
    Feb 3, 2013. 09:06 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
21 Comments
35 Likes