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153972

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  • Facebook: Opportunities And Challenges In E-Money Space [View article]
    First of all it wasn't rambling. I may not have been clear due to to brevity.

    Second, FB growth will inevitably slow down. No company can realistically continue to grow at the rate they are. This is not to say that there won't be growth. My comment didn't infer that.

    The younger demographic IMO will not go onto FB as geometrically as the later age millennials and both generation X and Y did. The teens of today and early 20 somethings will however and later on in life go onto FB IMO. Why? Because it will become it more relevant to them. They will want to "chat" with their real friends that they grew up in the neighborhood with, went to HS with, played sports with, worked part time, attended college etc. In other words reminisce and catch up since those friends will have moved away or they will have.

    Apr 16 05:44 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Facebook: Opportunities And Challenges In E-Money Space [View article]
    Monfrere,

    Too bad you didn't fully read my comment which is dismissive if you are going to seriously retort.

    If you did fully read it you didn't comprehend it since your response is asymmetric.


    Apr 16 04:44 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Facebook: Opportunities And Challenges In E-Money Space [View article]
    Sarita,

    Thx for the article.

    Similar to Guy in Ithaca, I can envision FB becoming one of the dominant players on the Internet in the next 5 years. Will other more nimble players cherry pick and take ad revenue from FB through their apps, technology, specialities? Yes. And what demographic will that be? Mostly the teens and twenty somethings. The "older" demographics on the other hand will be "hooked" on FB similar to how other prior generations were hooked on P&G products and kept buying Tide year after year instead of UL and vice a versa.
    Apr 16 04:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Intel Is On Track To Grow This Year With Bullish Prospects For 2015 And 2016 [View article]
    Michael,

    I sent the identical below comment to Russ. Please read at your convenience and comment if inclined. I'd be interested in hearing your take as well.

    Yesterday there was an article in the FT that discussed the tablet business in China. The upshot of the article was that the indigenous component chip suppliers in China proper were selling their chips for the ASP of 5 to 10 bucks whereas INTC was selling their chips for around 30 to 50 so how could INTC realistically attempt to capture the cheaply priced tablet market.

    Since INTC has reported, I'd be interested in hearing your opinion on this since their mobile and communication business was much worst than the prior FY same quarter. In other words given the 14nm scenario, do you think that INTC can sell their inexpensively priced chips for $5 to $10 down the road.

    I've attached a link of the FT article for your edification.

    http://on.ft.com/1kzkJW5
    Apr 16 03:51 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Intel: My Take On The Earnings Report [View article]
    Russ,

    Yesterday there was an article in the FT that discussed the tablet business in China. The upshot of the article was that the indigenous component chip suppliers in China proper were selling their chips for the ASP of 5 to 10 bucks whereas INTC was selling their chips for around 30 to 50 so how could INTC realistically attempt to capture the cheaply priced tablet market.

    Since INTC has reported, I'd be interested in hearing your opinion on this since their mobile and communication business was much worst than the prior FY same quarter. In other words given the 14nm scenario, do you think that INTC can sell their inexpensively priced chips for $5 to $10 down the road.

    I've attached a link of the FT article for your edification.

    http://on.ft.com/1kzkJW5
    Apr 16 03:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Coca-Cola Company: This Stock Still Holds A Buy Rating [View article]
    If ifs and buts were candies and nuts we'd all have a Merry Christmas.

    Mr. Kent needs to aggressively scale back over the next 5 years the carbonated soda drink category. According to KO and this quarter this is the first time in ten years that they've lost worldwide volume in carbonated drinks. Instead of buying back shares and increasing the dividend, he needs to seriously review his options, in North America and W. Europe, then invest in R&D for the purpose of innovating healthier drinking options.

    I don't disagree with the author about Monster but a Monster purchase will not be the long term fix. It will be a realignment in its portfolio, particularly in advanced western countries and Japan.

    Mr. Kent may also have to eat his words and buy some alcoholic beverage companies. Beer consumption worldwide is growing. Hard alcohol consumption too has been growing versus carbonated soft drinks.

    I am still long KO but will take some profits @ $40 a share.
    Apr 15 07:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Stocks: Short And Medium-Term Outlook [View article]
    I echo SeekingTruth's comments.

    Please keep up the great work.
    Apr 15 05:54 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Michael Lewis' Flawed New Book [View article]
    Felix,

    Since you've only read half the book your title is misleading. How about reading the entire book then commenting?

    FYI: Many of the critiques that you mention were asked and answered on Charlie Rose's interview with Mr. Lewis and in as separate interview with two other financial broadcasters on Bloomberg. I suggest that you view them for further edification.

    Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't HFT still constitute over 70% of the trades everyday? In other words HFT are still outsized compared to old fashion computer trades.
    Apr 10 11:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Market Valuation, Inflation And Treasury Yields: Clues From The Past [View article]
    Doug,

    As always your charts and data are illuminating.

    As a caveat the 1937 market downturn occurred because we entered another recession during a Great Depression due to attempts to reduce spending, raise taxes and a tightening of the money supply. I don't foresee anytime soon any of the aforementioned governmental tax and spend policies from occurring or a tightening as the Fed did in the late 30s.
    Apr 10 11:08 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Flows Into Emerging Markets Surge While Cracks In The U.S. Widen [View article]
    Great work.

    Thx.
    Apr 10 10:52 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Yes, The SEC Was Colluding With Banks On CDO Prosecutions [View article]
    We need to stop the revolving door of SEC employees going to Wall Street then return to the SEC only to go back to Wall Street. It is a revolving door that opens itself to this type penury punishment.
    Apr 10 10:43 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The True Cost Of Facebook's Acquisitions [View article]
    Justin,

    I don't see it as a problem. I see it as an opportunity and that is where we differ. With this in mind this will be me last comment regarding our dialogue because I don't think that either of us will change our opinions.

    I am an agnostic on the WhatsApp investment. I don't know what will happen but I am willing to risk money investing in FB.

    The guitar analogy reminds me of the broccoli analogy used by Chief Justice Roberts in the Citizens United decision. In other words it is so sweeping and not applicable to the previous topic, (technology vs an instrument or a single vegetable vs the US healthcare insurance marketplace), that the logic of the argument falls on its face when drilling down into syllogism.

    Similarly, if you think Mr. Zuckerberg bought WhatsApp to be a static business, that is to say the Vlasic gallon pickle jar scenario you referenced, then we will have to agree to disagree. To be sure, neither one of knows what Mr. Zuckerberg's plans are for WhatsApp but I am sure of this, he did not buy it to be a one trick pony and more importantly not change the user agreement down the road. It is only a question of time and if the marketplace will accept the change.

    In all likelihood my timeline for the ROA on WhatsApp is much different than yours too. I am an investor in FB not a trader. This is not to say that I won't exit the investment if my investment thesis changes or I won't take some shares off the table down the road but for now I am buy and hold.

    FB IMO will not just be a social media company in the next 5 years. It will have evolved through acquisitions, partnerships, maybe mergers into a company that may dominate the internet. It could also blow up and fail. I am willing to risk my money on the former. Neither one of us knows what will happen until 2019.

    Good luck with your investments as long as they don't conflict with mine.

    Regards.
    Apr 8 01:51 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The True Cost Of Facebook's Acquisitions [View article]
    Justin,

    How do you know that? You don't and neither do I.

    With only and approximately 50 people as their CURRENT total work population and BILLIONS of potential wireless customers and ASSUMING they were to adopt successful apps that were commercially viable for data and voice then any attempt to calculate how long the ROA would be is spurious.

    The point of the question is that some bean counter investors tend to value the investment on short term financial metrics without factoring in where the purchasing company may innovate new accretive methods to the original purchase., e.g., Walt Disney buying a parcel of land in Anaheim, CA, etc.
    Apr 7 07:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Ford: Focus On Europe And Overall Strength [View article]
    Don't forget China. Sales there too are increasing and are taking market share as well.
    Apr 5 03:25 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The True Cost Of Facebook's Acquisitions [View article]
    I agree that FB was overvalued on the two days that Mr. Zuckerberg bought WhatsApp and Oculus, hence the probable reason he mostly paid in stock.

    At the same time the sellers were advised that Mr. Zuckerberg's offer was better than what they could expect in the next couple of years so they should take the offer.

    As of today we don't know what plans Mr. Zuckerberg has for WhatsApp. I could envision WhatsApp evolving into a competitor of AT&T, Verizon, Vodafone, BT, etc., and on a worldwide basis. Extrapolate the revenues that might be earned by developing apps for voice, data, in addition to the current messaging app., then undercutting the telecoms by offering plans by 75%, hypothetically. What would be the ROA for that 19B investment then?
    Apr 5 12:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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