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Tack

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  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    e:

    Apples and oranges. These funds all serve different purposes.

    FFC is a preferred-stock fund (looks good) and NIO is a muni-bond fund (looks ok, too), but AIF is a collateralized-loan floating-rate fund. All three fund employ about 1/3 leverage. Two very attractive features of AIF are its sizable discount to NAV and its, therefore, elevated yield, especially for a floating-rate entity.

    The perceived risk all depends on what one is worried about. Of the three, clearly, NIO will perform the best in any falling market with weak interest rates. On the other hand, AIF is likely to perform the best of the three in a rising-rate environment.
    Apr 15 09:56 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Best Ways To Invest -- What's Your Opinion? A Place To Share Ideas! #16 [View instapost]
    as:

    Just a few names worth a look:

    (PBR)
    (VALE)
    (SID)
    (ABEV)
    (BSBR)
    (BSMX)
    (AKO.A)
    (POT)
    (IRR)
    (IAE)
    (IHD)
    (SCCO)
    (SQM)
    (SDRL)
    (TEF)
    Apr 14 04:21 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    S:

    Apparently, many must never consult actual performance, but make their buy/sell decisions on the herd mentality about what rates must do.
    Apr 14 04:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    S:

    Wasn't familiar with either of those. Had been tracking another new one, ACSF, which now has an indicated yield of 6.9% on a full-quarter basis. One glance, though, at AIF convinced me that it was a a nice buy, so I added some. Thanks.
    Apr 14 03:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    S:

    Yes, the overall performance and distributions somewhat better than I anticipated. Ycharts shows to overall total return for five years to be 124.2%, which is not bad, even if less than other issues: http://bit.ly/1t0XEQ1
    Apr 14 01:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    south:

    A couple observations:

    1) When I look at the 5-year chart of SWZ, I see a lot of volatility and only modest gains (including a minuscule dividend). I'm not sure the attraction.

    2) If one invests in a diversified national fund, it's not a pure currency play by any means. It's not clear at all that one benefits from the CHR hoing higher because virtually every Swiss company is almost exclusively an exporter, so an expensive currency dampens their business and their remitted profits.
    Apr 14 12:44 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Four Horsemen Of The Stock Market Apocalypse [View article]
    S:

    But, I am always gratified, simply pondering the results of those immersed in their own pessimism. Life has its own just rewards.

    And, if they assert that they're doing just great, investing on the upside, then, they merely reveal their negative rhetoric to be hypocrisy.
    Apr 14 12:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Inflation Next? [View article]
    s:

    Interest payments are not some God-given entitlement. Nobody owes you a dime for placing your money in a bank account. If you can't accept that reality and thereby suffer, then you only require a mirror to find the culprit.

    "Earners" of dollars, i.e., those making the correct placements of their funds, have been doing just fine, thank you.
    Apr 14 10:08 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Inflation Next? [View article]
    g:

    Rates have been raised many times in the past. Realty collapsed in 2008 because loans were provided to wholly unqualified borrowers, many of whom didn't even have the intention to pay the borrowings undertaken, much less the ability.
    Apr 13 11:10 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    g:

    Yes, what about them?

    They're where they are because there are little inflationary pressures and no signs that we're about to take off on expansive growth and elevated credit demand. It has virtually nothing to do with QE.
    Apr 13 09:57 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    V:

    Trading is a perilous occupation, even if you haven't discovered that, as yet. Further, the approaches and requirements of someone 64 and 27 are likely to be far different.

    My strategy doesn't depend on guessing market direction. I have developed and managed a portfolio that is a huge income engine, and it keeps cranking out that income in all kinds of market conditions. I can depend on that income without having to wonder if my trading or capital gains will pay the freight. By discovering undervalued issues, I get the income and nice capital appreciation, too, over time.

    Investing only long doesn't mean being overextended in one asset class. Many types of investments are countercyclical. But, what I strive for is constant high-yielding income. It's amazing the sins that constant high income makes up for. I do augment my long positions with various options strategies, mostly selling puts and infrequent bear put spreads.
    Apr 13 05:23 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    V:

    Sorry to burst your bubble, but the venture was sold in 1995 and that sale didn't provide me anything close to retirement capital. But, I managed to make good high-yield value investments (no dot-coms, no home flips) that allowed me subsequently to retire and stay retired. The carnage of 2008 did set me up for the best investment year of my life in 2009 (bank and insurance-company preferred stocks), one I doubt I'll ever exceed.

    My own investment experience goes back to the '70's, however, long before 1995.

    If you are fortunate to have significant capital at 27, that's great. If you adopt a consistent value-investing approach, and just compound, like a tortoise, rather than chase, like a hare, you'll do very well indeed.
    Apr 13 05:00 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    V:

    But, I believe I have been a good investor, with many years of experience, building and managing sufficient capital that allowed me to retire at 49 and to live a prosperous life since, for the last fifteen years, entirely on investment income. I have accomplished this not by making market-timing guesses, but by making astute value investments in depressed issues and sectors and harvesting high yields throughout.

    I try, always, to maintain a balanced approach. Presently, my portfolio is allocated about 50% common stocks, 25% preferreds and 25% debt classes. My uninvested cash is about 10%. In the last two days of wipe-outs, my portfolio went basically nowhere, which is about what I intended. If we see any disproportionate pullback in common shares, I'll raise that allocation, if I detect new values, while cutting back on debt and cash.
    Apr 13 04:45 PM | 10 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    V:

    You don't get to keep mentioning "subprime," like a parrot, without explaining what huge subprime lending exposure you see in the private sector at this time.

    Have at it.
    Apr 13 04:23 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Stocks Won't Crash (For Now) [View article]
    LT:

    I am a private investor. I can assure you that your results are unlikely to impress me unless they're measured in multiple hundreds of percent. If they are, then, I congratulate you, too. (I might add that mine have been achieved while being long only.)
    Apr 13 04:15 PM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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