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cstauffer

cstauffer
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  • Speculation On The Cause Of The OMONTYS Recall [View article]
    Couldn't they draw blood and simply test the blood? I would assume that blood from a patient who would exhibit a severe allergic reaction when tested with Omontys?
    Mar 13 11:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Speculation On The Cause Of The OMONTYS Recall [View article]
    I am not a doctor, nor a scientist of any type, but it would seem that a patient could be tested for hypersensitivity or blood could be drawn and tested for adverse reaction to Omontys.

    I really do not understand why a test of some type is not the most logical and expedient solution?
    Mar 4 09:54 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Speculation On The Cause Of The OMONTYS Recall [View article]
    Chemist, I really don't have any idea what you are talking about, but that is because I am not a scientist. However, you seem to be picking up on what I am, and that is that the known facts of the case involving this drug does not necessary lead to completely pulling the drug off the market the way that this occurred.
    Feb 28 08:54 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Speculation On The Cause Of The OMONTYS Recall [View article]
    I don't know? Something just does not add up with the way this was handled. There did not seem to be any justification for taking existing patients off of the Omontys who were tolerent of the drug. If the medical community can inject live viruses in people and inject allergens to induce allergic reactions for testing reasons safely, it completely escapes me why they did not leave those who are tolerent of the drug on it and quickly develop a way to screen new patients to determine if they will be tolerent of the drug.
    Feb 28 08:24 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Speculation On The Cause Of The OMONTYS Recall [View article]
    Can anyone explain why the decision was made to pull the drug off the market for patients who were already safely using the drug given that all adverse affects occurred with first time usage. Also, why can't they administer as very low dose of the drug in new patients, similar to what is done by an allergist when a person is being tested to determine what they are allergic to, and screen new patients in that manner before putting them on Omontys?
    Feb 28 07:47 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The money management business inspires a lively exchange at the Barron's Roundtable, with Brian Rogers' liking of Legg Mason (LM) as either a value or takeover play getting the thumbs up from Mario Gabelli, but a razzing from Bill Gross who says the stock-picking industry is in secular decline thanks to ETFs. Gabelli to Gross: "If you want to preach in favor of mindless investing, we don't have to stand by." [View news story]
    Tomas, I have been in this industry for a long time and I left the industry as an employee back in 2008 to start my own firm because I had witnessed the asset management business becoming ever increasingly commoditized and homogenized. Advisers fully embraced becoming manager of managers, but they still continued to charge the same fee as they did in the past when they actually did research, built portfolios and engaged in independent thought. I was disgusted and did not want to have anything to with this malpractice, in my opinion.
    Jan 27 06:55 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The money management business inspires a lively exchange at the Barron's Roundtable, with Brian Rogers' liking of Legg Mason (LM) as either a value or takeover play getting the thumbs up from Mario Gabelli, but a razzing from Bill Gross who says the stock-picking industry is in secular decline thanks to ETFs. Gabelli to Gross: "If you want to preach in favor of mindless investing, we don't have to stand by." [View news story]
    shourey, I tend to agree with you even though I do believe that active management can add risk adjusted value when it is done right. The market as defined by the market cap weighted S&P 500 index is not smart at all, in fact if, like the market, an asset manager would have been 30% in technology stocks in 1999 and 21% in financials in 2008, he should have been fired. The problem with active management today is not "active management' it is "closet indexing". Most large actively managed funds are statistically equivalent to the index that they track and therefore fees and timing mistakes doom them to under-perform. These types of funds are certainly not worth the fees that they charge. However there are very good active managers who do not closet index and who add value over time.
    Jan 27 03:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why You Should Sell Vertex [View article]
    Seeking, you are correct. The Kalydeco platform is designed to treat most forms of Cystic Fibrosis and this science is the first of its kind to actually go after the cause of Cystic Fibrosis instead of former treatments which only targeted symtoms. Before Kalydeco suffers of Cystic Fibrosis usually did not survive past 30 years of age.
    Jan 21 04:44 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, I have re-read your posts and I really don't see the brillance. First of all, anyone who tries to argue that Roosevelt did not pull the country out of the Great Depression loses any benefit of the doubt that I might give someone on a message board like this. Almost any credible analysis of the most impactful and best U.S. Presidents puts FDR in the top five overall, and number one since Lincoln. If you have actually ever had the opportunity to talk with someone who lived through the Great Depression as an adult, you would not be saying what you did about FDR. You have not backed up your criticism of Obamacare. You and agree that we should have done a large infrastructure stimulus, but that was not politically possible at the time and certainly not possible after the mid-term elections in 2010.
    Jan 6 11:06 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, any one who actually looks at what Obamacare does, the nuts and bolts of the legislation, cannot possibly be impressed at the scope that it entails to deliver better and more affordable healthcare to everyone.
    Jan 5 10:13 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, put yourself in President Obama's shoes for a moment. Virtually every Democrat President since Truman has tried to get enough support to pass a universal care healthcare bill and President Obama had one chance ahead of the mid-term elections to actually get this legislation passed. Had he not pushed ahead, it might be another 65 years before that time came around again. Also, with healthcare costs being our biggest fiscal threat and the number of uninsured at a record high equating to almost 20% of the country, I think that it was a pretty high priority.
    Jan 5 10:10 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • U.S. Taxes: Who Makes And Who Pays - More Than The Rich Will Have To Pay More [View article]
    205427,

    Diluting current shareholders does not cost the company, it costs the shareholders. These options are not options purchased in the market, they are private contractual options that are truly phantom until exercised.

    My point is only to say that just because you are granted options in such a way that you do not even have to pay taxes on the "value" of that perk, a person is taking no risk. This is not the same as saying that they don't have anything at risk. They do have something at risk, but that something is a phantom contractual arrangement that cost them nothing in the first place. It is not like most of these executives are given a choice between a cash bonus or an option.
    Jan 4 10:29 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, interesting statement given the the fastest growing large economy in the world over the last 20 years has been China, which is a command and control economy dominated by the government.
    Jan 3 09:22 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, the last recession began in January 2008 and the financial crisis truly began with the failure of Bear Stearns in April, 2008 and then spun out of control after the failure of Lehman Bros. in September, 2008. People like to blame easy money policies of the Fed from 2001 to 2007 as the main cause of the housing bubble. However, the Fed cut rates from 2001 through the end of 2002 and began to raise interest rates in 2003 and did so consistently through 2007. Absent QE, the Fed can only effect short-term rates, not long-term rates that the 10, 20, or 30 year mortgage rates are priced on. If you remember Greenspan testified to Congress regarding the "Conundrum" of long-term rates not responding to the Fed's interest rate tightening. That conundrum in retrospect was do to the fact that the world was awash in liquidity due to unchecked leverage.
    Jan 3 09:21 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans - including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor - are reportedly overwhelmingly opposed to the fiscal cliff deal approved by the Senate. The House appears poised to amend the deal and send it back to the Senate, setting up a legislative high-wire act. [View news story]
    mike, look outside the borders of the U.S. Since the financial crisis, that was indeed significantly enabled by the deregulation of financial markets that allowed commercial banks to get involved with capital markets. What that meant was that banks, who originate mortgages were also allowed to syndicate, package and sell those mortgage to off balance sheet entities (shadow banking system) and hedge funds. Lack of regulation allowed those shadow banking entities and hedge funds to leverage themselves 50X to 100X. Where do think all that liquidity came from to fund these mortgages?
    Jan 3 09:12 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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430 Comments
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