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inthemoney

inthemoney
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  • Why can't companies find the employees they need? Failings in the U.S. education system or other external factors usually get blamed. But companies deserve a lot of the blame themselves because many don't do training any more or allow people any time to grow into a job, Peter Cappelli writes.  [View news story]
    Jackson, young employees who don't leave for better opportunities are usually the ones with less initiative , less marketable ones.
    Recruiters call me all the time and I could leave for 10% higher salary tomorrow, no matter what the current salary is. I don't leave because there are other considerations such as commute, or selling house, or schools.
    Who cares where you are on the totem pole if you getting 10% higher salary? Changing jobs is the most effective way to push your carrier forward and you have to do it while you are young to gain the most experience. Sitting in one place for years is a sure ticket for unemployement later in life. You don't learn much y doing the same job over and over.
    Oct 25, 2011. 11:15 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why can't companies find the employees they need? Failings in the U.S. education system or other external factors usually get blamed. But companies deserve a lot of the blame themselves because many don't do training any more or allow people any time to grow into a job, Peter Cappelli writes.  [View news story]
    I would imagine there is a lot of competition for sales jobs since they don't requrie any hard skills and are a good fit for all the unemployed liberal arts people. It is in your best itnerest to taylor a resume to be seen among thousands of others who apply.

    The problem is that US education is so watered down even an IT major doesn't know all that much and you have to spend years training them.
    Oct 25, 2011. 10:46 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why U.S. Unemployment Remains So High [View article]
    >"If my local high school can’t afford new computers, how is it going to feed Silicon Valley with computer literate work force?"

    Do you think every chinese or indian school has computers? They have several per school , if lucky, and they take turns.
    Every public library in the US has computers. The only problem with the US education is the lack of will to learn. The will to learn should come from will to live and survive and succeed in order to live well.In the US people are like sitting ducks waiting for somebody to come and solve their problems. And that is coming from someone who grew up in USSR. If you were so passive in Russia you'd die of hunger and nobody would even notice. I am not even talking about chinese who are completely cut-throat and ruthless.Chinese don't respect contracts. Contracts are there to deceive your opponent. They conduct business like it is a war. This is who you are competeting with for jobs. This is a much bigger problem than kids not having access to a computer at their convinience.
    Oct 24, 2011. 08:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "The best thing that Wall Street may have going for it," writes Paul Lim in the NYT, "is that so many investors are pessimistic." That's because sentiment is a "contrarian indicator" for future activity. Similarly for consumer confidence, which continues to slump even as retail sales rise.  [View news story]
    > The rate of retail sales expansion has exceeded inflation.

    Really, the yoy increase is greater than 3%? I remember numbers in 1% range.
    Oct 23, 2011. 01:29 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "The best thing that Wall Street may have going for it," writes Paul Lim in the NYT, "is that so many investors are pessimistic." That's because sentiment is a "contrarian indicator" for future activity. Similarly for consumer confidence, which continues to slump even as retail sales rise.  [View news story]
    The retail sales rise is in real or nominal terms? I think it is in nominal terms and therfore means nothing since the % rise is lower than inflation numbers.
    Oct 23, 2011. 11:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The keyword used to be "synergy" - the justification for a host of mergers with varying success rates. In 2011, it's the spinoff that's in: Twenty public companies this year have announced they're breaking pieces off, including Abbott Labs (ABT), Kraft (KFT), ConocoPhillips (COP) and Sara Lee (SLE). And whatever the reason, Dan Primack says, it's good for the economy.  [View news story]
    In reality , the spin-offs are usually done for the market valuation purposes. There is a tendency to value parts higher separately.
    But it do create jobs, though. After spin-off, each one of these big companies need two legal departments, two IT departments, two security departments and what not.
    Big companies should have synergies but their huge bureaucracies make everything so inefficient that the synergy cannot compensate for it.
    Oct 22, 2011. 01:44 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Exasperated With the Salesforce Bears [View article]
    Well, I work with SAP and Oracle. And comparing Salesforce to them is like compariing a mouse to an elephant. Yes, a mouse might be quicker and cuter but an elefant is sturdier and lives much longer.
    SAP and Oracle are complex because they can be adapted to a variety of businesses and processes on a huge scale, from finance and supply chain to hr, via configuration and some coding. With Salesforce, what you see is what you get, and it addresses just a tiny segment of a company's needs - sales and marketing leads. It is really just a glorified and very pretty email and reporting solution.
    Oct 21, 2011. 02:39 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The President is set to announce the withdrawal of all troops from Iraq by year's end. Watch live here.  [View news story]
    Will the size of military be reduced as a result I am wondering?
    Oct 21, 2011. 01:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "I suspect ... Operation Twist (has) so far been of greater benefit to traders and large monied interests than to job-creating businesses," says the Dallas Fed's Richard Fisher, continuing to oppose more pump-priming. It's now up to fiscal policy to provide the right mix of incentives to move the economy forward.  [View news story]
    Wow, you don't say. Unlike money jobs can't be created out of thin air, they requrie market demand and prior planning. They belong on the real world plane , not the virtual plane where the FED and other financial wizards operate. FED should stick to inflation targeting.
    Oct 21, 2011. 01:52 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Not since at least 1960 has the U.S. standard of living fallen so fast for so long. The average American has $1,315 less in annual disposable income now than at the start of the recession. More pieces of evidence (as if you needed them): The misery index has hit a 28-year high, real GDP is mired at 2005 levels, and median paychecks are at their lowest since 1999.  [View news story]
    Davidbc, what you are saying about the cutting ineffcient government makes sense. And it is already happening to some degree. If you look at the unemployement stats, lately the lost jobs are in the government.So, then the question is - who is going to hire those people? Nobody. There is no demand in the economy. What is goign to happen to them? They'll probably stay on unemployement for 2 years and then they'll start rioting.
    Any change in the size of government has to be gradual so that private side can adjust. And it means we have to support our huge government for years to come. But who has the will to oversee the gradual reduction in govrenment for 10-20 years? Again, nobody. We passed the point of no return somewhere in the 90s when the government got so big.
    Oct 21, 2011. 11:33 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why would stocks soar as Europe can’t even agree to disagree on how to deal with its debt problems? Art Cashin's theory: Investors might simply be relieved that Europe’s Big Decision moment keeps getting kicked further down the road. He likens the market's illogical impulse to a story about teaching a horse to fly... well, you'll just have to read it.  [View news story]
    The stocks soar because FED has been lately talking about some form of QE3 like purchasing MBS. Europe is just a smoke screen.
    Oct 21, 2011. 09:41 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Not since at least 1960 has the U.S. standard of living fallen so fast for so long. The average American has $1,315 less in annual disposable income now than at the start of the recession. More pieces of evidence (as if you needed them): The misery index has hit a 28-year high, real GDP is mired at 2005 levels, and median paychecks are at their lowest since 1999.  [View news story]
    > And how is it that we allow companies to sell their goods in this country when their work environments would violate our own regulations?
    ----------------------...

    May be europeans should get on a high horse and refuse to buy american products on the basis that US doesn't provide paid maternity leave or mandatory vacation?

    Mixing politics with economics solves nothing and usually is just an excuse. You are basically arguing fo tariffs to preserve the american jobs. But the disparity in labor costs is so big that you'd need a 30% tariff, which will put US in conflict with WTO.
    Further, how do you put a tariff on a indian call center?

    Free market forces are not to be deinied no matter how an average american protests. The impact can be softened but not by much.
    Oct 20, 2011. 09:42 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Fed's Dan Tarullo hints the bank is considering a new program of buying MBS to boost the economy. "I believe we should move back up toward the top of the list of options the large-scale purchase of additional MBS," he says in a speech. Tarullo's comments are especially notable because he's a lawyer focused on bank regulation, and to date has not really addressed the economy.  [View news story]
    FED is getting really desperate now. Just a couple days ago they were suggesting to abandon the inflation target of 2%.
    Oct 20, 2011. 08:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Not since at least 1960 has the U.S. standard of living fallen so fast for so long. The average American has $1,315 less in annual disposable income now than at the start of the recession. More pieces of evidence (as if you needed them): The misery index has hit a 28-year high, real GDP is mired at 2005 levels, and median paychecks are at their lowest since 1999.  [View news story]
    So many posts and all wrong. The single most important factor in american declining standard of livining is globalization. It will continue to decline until it gets within more equitable range with the other countries. The access to labor is global now. The labor is global commodity. Unless you manage to aquite very specialized skills and you know how to apply them effectively , you standard of livining will continue to go down until it reaches that of an average european or further that of an average chinese. Blaming taxes, rich, unions , politicians doesn't change that simple fact and helps nothing.
    Oct 20, 2011. 08:48 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The SSA releases 2010 wage statistics in a report that Reuters' David Cay Johnston calls "awful" (video). Jumping out: (1) The median level of wages of $26,364 is at its lowest level since 1999 after adjusting for inflation; (2) 3.3% of people who had a job in 2007 went all of 2010 without earning a dollar; (3) Total wages and salaries adjusted for inflation meets the mark of 2005, falling short of the level recorded over the last four years.  [View news story]
    It feels like adjusted for inflation the salaries are at about or below 2000 levels. There is really no reason for them to rise inr eal terms since US economy is stagnating.
    Oct 20, 2011. 01:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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