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  • My Utility Fund Vs. Reaves Utility Income Fund: Which Offered The Better Return Last Year? [View article]
    Steven,
    "One other point, UTG is able to make a higher return and pay higher dividends than a straight-forward portfolio of similar stocks because it is leveraged. This is a tremendous advantage of closed end funds, since they can borrow at an institutional rate (1-2%) and re-invest in stocks that pay dividends of 5-6% or more-----"
    I don't count the same as you!!
    Tell me, how do expenses get paid, and who pays them, and how does that affect total return?, the divs are not Qualified--You pay ordinary income tax rate.
    Compare against Total return with, T, VZ CNSL, and many more!
    Apr 17 05:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 3 High Yield Alternative Income ETFs [View article]
    It always amazes me that recommendations such as these avoid the reality of minimizing returns by heavy management fees.
    Wouldn't be better is the Author did a little more DD, and made some suggestions of solid equities that offer greater total returns. Many pfds, mlps, reits provide better growth/returns.
    Apr 16 08:12 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Use Ensco To Build Dividend Income [View article]
    that's all for me w/ this wonderful comment--bye
    Apr 10 08:41 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Dividend Portfolio: Q1 2014 [View article]
    I think you should re-evaluate. I spend about 5%/yr, and then, at 79, my RMD is another 5%+ and the margin tax of 32% rate.
    Apr 8 09:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Dividend Portfolio: Q1 2014 [View article]
    When you get to 70.5 yrs, your RMD will raise your rate--it happens quick!
    Apr 8 11:39 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Dividend Portfolio: Q1 2014 [View article]
    Now Larry Kudlow got cremated by CNBC!
    Apr 8 11:37 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Look To Eaton Vance CEFs For Tax-Advantaged High Yield [View article]
    Left,
    Nice divs in ETG,ETO! However, real world, total return[divs] diminished by costs of aprox 1.5%/yr for each!
    It seems the funds reduce asset value to get paid! Then ROC reduces basis--then recapture at sale in taxable acct. Further! Cash divs at ordinary income marginal tax basis.
    If in IRA--then ultimately pay marginal tax rate.
    Let's get the whole story out?
    Apr 6 06:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • General Partners Offer Leveraged Exposure To MLP Distribution Growth [View article]
    V--man,
    Haven't thought of this issue for a while. I do remember "Reel Ken's" Post saying that, those distribution's paid below zero basis, while taxed at LTCG rate on a yearly basis, are recaptured on sale, and taxed at ordinary income rates. Does that fit w/ your thinking?
    Apr 5 09:36 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: ETF Portfolio Versus The Stock Only Portfolio; Our First Update [View article]
    I suspect the real AFTER TAX total return on ETFS will be lower than a portfolio of good stocks. Consider: MGT fees, cash returns[VYM], vs Qualified Divs {GE, T, etc]. Too much talk about gross returns, vs post tax returns are confusing results.
    Apr 2 08:15 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: ETF Portfolio Versus The Stock Only Portfolio; Our First Update [View article]
    I agree with Div Nut. One rose , does not a garden make!
    Reaching outside of ETF stock holdings, one can find greater total returns.
    However, putting on cruise control w/ ETFS has it's benefits for old people like me!
    Apr 1 08:49 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Get $10,000 Each Year From A $250,000 Nest Egg [View article]
    The much discussed generality of 4% withdrawal rate is some what illusory, as post tax income can vary widely depending on the type of holding. ie a muni fund at 4% gives 4%, while a CEF at 4% can give anywhere from 3% to 2.4% depending on tax bracket. I evaluate my div income on a post tax basis, and I know where I am!
    Mar 31 10:16 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Utility Fund Vs. Reaves Utility Income Fund: Which Offered The Better Return Last Year? [View article]
    These expenses are paid out of somewhere--ie the assets are reduced
    /share! Bottom line, total return is reduced. Any way you look at it, the 6% div is ultimately/essentially reduced by expenses. No magic mirrors,or illusions here. I agree that, the 6% is "net", but the assets are reduced pro rata by expenses!
    My comment of reducing the div % by expenses, equates to Total return of the div, even before taxes.

    "Expenses of UTG Per Common Share
    Management Fees 0.80%
    Other Expenses: 0.41%
    Baseline Expense: 1.20%
    Interest Expense: 0.50%
    Total: 1.70 "
    Mar 27 11:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Utility Fund Vs. Reaves Utility Income Fund: Which Offered The Better Return Last Year? [View article]
    Thanks fludolph, I was given to understand that the "fees' were paid by reducing the asset value. If so, the total return is diminished whether in IRA, or taxable acct..
    What say you?
    Sooner or later, one would pay ordinary income from IRA holdings. I am. at 80, my RMD tax is 30%!
    Mar 27 01:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Danger Zone: Dunkin' Brands Group [View article]
    I go to DUNKIN and STARBUCKS, and find their both busy like the Apple store!
    I see great growth in their charts! One can pick at the undersides of fast growing
    companies, but past results may be a look at the future. Long both, and lovin it!
    Mar 27 12:41 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Utility Fund Vs. Reaves Utility Income Fund: Which Offered The Better Return Last Year? [View article]
    One has to do the numbers. UTG pays a dividend, that is taxed, as ordinary income at the marginal rate. Could be a differential of 15-25% more, than a "qualified" div taxed at 15%.
    Your combination of stocks at 4.8% pre tax with all qualified divs = net $4.08 post tax.
    UTG pays 6%, less 1.6% fee = 4.4% before tax--then a tax of aprox 35% = net post tax div return of 2.86%.
    Not a particularly a good long term comparison to your portfolio
    Mar 26 11:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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