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Rich in Quebec

Rich in Quebec
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  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    a64hoo and Husker Bob - I don't know why you imagine nationalization of companies would ensue following action or inaction that would fail to meet political agendas. Companies would likely be fined, not nationalized, if it failed to pay minimum wage, discriminated against women, discriminated against certain ethnic groups, etc.. Sometime in the past, weren't there problems in the U.S. just getting service at lunch counters? Perhaps you're complaining about this specific "defined political agenda" since there was no nationalization.
    Apr 21 11:33 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Long term bio - Your pseudonym got me thinking! Can we expect future earnings by bio companies to be anything like the past considering the inability of countries' health care systems to pay for ever more expensive drugs providing ever less advantage over previous generations of drugs? Will the American model of convincing prospective patients by direct advertising to use their latest product continue to fluorish as pressure from government to limit costs grows? It will take some convincing to have me invest in the sector.
    Apr 21 08:39 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Berbno - Too late! I have already commented on it this morning on the continuation to the discussion that gggl mentioned. Perhaps surprisingly, I too come to the conclusion that the "gun issue" will go away, or more specifically, die out with those who grew up playing cowboys and Indians and watching TV and movie heroes meting out extra-judicial justice with no need for the niceties of bureaucrats from back East. Perhaps, it's more a hope than a firm conclusion.
    Apr 21 08:25 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    John - We just had a provincial election where the Quebec sovereignty option seemed to have been soundly trashed. I bring it up because there are issues that may be generational. By recent polls, it seems that Quebec sovereignty is more popular with the old than the young. The old still remember the perceived slights at the hands of the Anglo-Canadian majority. Young Francophones and Anglophones more often see the existence of the other as an enrichment to their lives.

    Berbno may well have a valid point, and your reference to Oprah demonstrates it. Your reference to a black person in the past would have had racial overtones. This reference to Oprah did not. Countries evolve.
    There is no doubt that a significant subset of Americans are heavily involved with the fears prevalent during colonial America. Much as much of the South had to see its last remnants of the population living during the Civil War and Reconstruction die off before it could philosophically get beyond its "peculiar institution" and join the 20th century, the generation that played cowboys and Indians may need to die off to finally have the U.S. lose its gun fetish, and reject extra-legal justice by means of the silent white-hatted, gun-toting hero, and finally join the 21st.
    Apr 21 07:55 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Jake - I have to disagree. Not only were Republicans invited to the healthcare table, the cuisine chosen was theirs. After all Obamacare has its historic roots solidly implanted in the Heritage Foundation with alterations by Mitt Romney. Republicans did not resent the menu so much as they did the host.
    Apr 20 08:24 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl - From a recent compilation, Canada had 2.5 gun deaths /100,000. The U.S had 10.2 . It's nothing to brag about. The same study showed the U.K. at one tenth the Canadian rate.
    Apr 19 10:17 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    John - I have never suggested that Canada is the best at anything. What I have done is suggest that if the U.S. were to be more "progressive", that disaster would not ensue. For that, I have used Canada as an example.

    I will suggest one Canadian superlative. We do have the world's most news worthy mayor in Rob Ford - unfortunately.
    Apr 18 10:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Blue Okie - I haven't heard of any comments on Americans coming to Canada during the Viet Nam War years lately. There should be commentary as we get closer to the 50th anniversary of heaviest part of the wave. What there used to be of reaction was positive, the VietNam War being unpopular in Canada, and even more so in Quebec.

    I remember having to explain to people here why I could not possibly teach in American public schools. They would finally understand that my teaching History or Civics in U.S. schools would be the equivalent of an avowed atheist teaching religion in a Quebec Catholic school.

    The argument you gave for a soldier to fight wars, ie., put aside his personal beliefs and follow orders, is the one that was used at the Nuremberg Trials, and rejected. Look up Immanuel Kant's categorical imperative for a more erudite argument for the necessity of doing more than slavishly following orders. Before you argue that my comparison goes too far, perhaps you should realize that one of my former softball teammates served in VietNam and was involved in the MyLai massacre.
    Apr 18 06:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - This all started when I was refuting the argument that illegal immigration was the cause of U.S. economic woes. I pointed out that Canada also has immigrants, that Europe has an open labor market, and that the illegal status of many immigrants in the U.S. was of little difference except for their legal status.

    Now, you have forgotten the original point, and turned into a 19th century imperialist, ignoring the people involved with the justification being the Monroe Doctrine, a self proclaimed and self-serving document.
    Apr 18 06:21 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - Since all countries have done silly things to tragically worse things, by your standard, anyone from anywhere but a blameless country stating a political opinion is being "hypocritical". Strange logic! Oh gee, I guess that's another hypocritical comment.
    Apr 18 05:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - Most Americans would think that the official results of the 2000 election was a greater error. For most, no elaboration is needed.
    Apr 18 01:27 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Overanalytical - The point I was trying to make is that the immigration problem could be legislated away. Within the European Union, there is free movement of labor. Within NAFTA, there is not, and thus the U.S. has the problem of illegal immigration. As in Europe or Canada, the proper integration of labor into society would be a challenge, but one easier to handle than when the stigma and the legal reality of illegality is presented.

    The presence of illegality allows the stigmatisation and scapegoating of these people, and also of their perfectly legal lookalikes.
    Apr 18 11:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Husker Bob - The U.S. may have the world's highest corporate tax RATE, but it certainly doesn't have the highest corporate taxes. There are too many exemptions in the tax code for that.

    As for minimum wage legislation, it does somewhat limit the widening chasm between rich and poor, and increases demand for goods and services. It also lessens the need for government services. After all, there are limits that the American public will accept even after decades of being told that government is the problem and not a solution, except for defense spending, of course.

    As for the ability of raising a family on a minimum wage, the goal of a living wage a century ago was to be able to lead a no frills life on ONE salary. So much wealth has been created and you give reasons why it should not be a goal of society to provide a floor to make it possible to do so on two salaries. You are proposing the American nightmare to replace the American dream.
    Apr 18 11:01 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    ltsgt1 - I question and wonder about lots of things including the absolutism of those who support a minority viewpoint.
    Apr 18 10:43 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    John - Yes, practically all our prices are a bit higher, and that's before taxes. But a 38% rise in pay would easily cover it. Even adjusted for the presently weak Loonie, there's a 24% difference. But, after all, Canada has always been poorer than the U.S.. But we do like to treat our fellow citizens equitably. A reasonable minimum wage is part of our social contract. Having the freedom to lord it over his neighbor with no pangs of sympathy has unfortunately become part of the social ethos since Ronnie brought back morning to America.

    As for immigration, both Canada and the U.S. accept people from around the world - our top five are China, the Philippines, India, Pakistan and yes, the U.S.. No, we don't have an illegal immigration problem. But, if the U.S. acted differently, maybe it wouldn't either. After all, the land Mexicans are comong to used to be theirs, until 1846.
    Apr 17 10:03 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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