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Rich in Quebec

Rich in Quebec
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  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Robert - Yes, there have been other interglacial periods. And yes, CO2 is food for plants, though it is a by-product effluent of animal life. We can try to argue all we want, but it would be as if elementary school students having just memorized the planets were trying to argue astro-physicists wrong on some point.

    Science is not without its internal politics and even hoaxes. That Piltdown Man was eventually shown to be a hoax does not "debunk" Darwin. Climatologists on climate change are becoming more certain just like the scientists studying tobacco were decades ago. The link tying them together is that some of the denial lobbying firms are the same. And much as with tobacco, delay worked for those profiting from their products.

    But don't worry, Robert. Much like the support for the Iraq War a decade ago, proponents will have forgotten that they were wrong, and indeed, ever provided verbal support.
    Apr 16 11:24 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    perplexedtex - Sure enough, when one googles Pinatubo greenhouse gases, the first entry states your claim. Fortunately, common sense and "serious" articles that follow debunk the claim.

    Do just this mental exercise. CO2 in the atmosphere represents a very small percentage of the total atmosphere. In fact, this is often used by deniers to show that its impact can only be negligible. But, we know that the number has been growing since the Industrial Revolution. If your claim were true, then CO2 levels would have jumped astronomically when Pinatubo erupted.

    Moreover, how would a field of science continue to exist if one eruption more than equaled all human emissions. Wouldn't there now be a new field of study examining how such a colassal hoax could have and continues to confound humanity?

    That the entry upon which you base your statement on climate change is listed first on Google is an indication as to how ignorant of science humanity is. In most countries, people recognize their ignorance and tend to believe the "experts". Unfortunately in the U.S., many cavalierly dismiss scientific thought when it is not in agreement with their prejudices. Americans believe themselves to be equal, a fine legal concept. But, people are not equal in ability, knowledge or wisdom.
    Apr 16 09:43 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    a64h00 - For those who subscribe to the theory that climate change is a giant conspiracy to keep climatologists in the money, they would do well to look at what is happening in Canada. There is no better way to lose Federal Conservative government funding here than to publish research results that counter the neutral if not positive image of Alberta's tar sands - oops,oil sands.
    Apr 16 08:09 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    John - I don't agree that all government "benefits" should be means tested. As an example, everyone who goes to public schools receives a benefit with no bill presented to the family. The taxes that pay for those schools are assessed in most American jurisdictions on real estate wealth whether the owner has children or not. To overly rely on means testing is to create a divided society, the givers and takers, with all the rancor that that brings about.

    In Canada, old age pensions are paid out to everyone. But, not only are they taxed, for the sufficiently wealthy, they are clawed back. It may seem only bureaucratic symbolism, but the us and them rhetoric so prevalent in the U.S. is more easily blunted by such symbolism.
    Apr 15 07:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    SZP30 -What's wrong with natural gas? Energy density as compared to gasoline. It's great for shunting around by pipeline and used for heating, and as a chemical feedstock.
    Apr 14 05:02 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    BenGee - In the long run, cars will be recharged on the highway, probably by induction. Batteries, with or without generators, will exist to get you from one road that is on the grid, to another.
    Apr 14 04:57 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - You've got it exactly backwards. If everyone insisted on charging cars when there was already peak demand, then powerplants would have to be built to supply that power. And if they were all coal, they would have to stay on. The reality, for now at least, is that all electric cars can theoretically be charged outside of peak hours, thus not increasing needs for greater peak power.

    Of course, reality is generally a mixed bag of power producers. Here in Quebec, we can't take advantage of all that otherwise wasted coal produced electricity in the middle of the night. With the closing down of our nuclear plant, we are now 100% hydro.
    Apr 14 03:19 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    a64hoo - The message from Berbno was about providing electricity for trucks rather than their diesels idling overnight - and no one said that it had to be free.

    From the standpoint of government having to make a profit, then the very existence of rest areas should be questioned. They are competition for private enterprise just off the interstates and they are constant money losers. That they probably save lives from tired drivers going a bit too far is irrelevant for those who judge utility only in terms of money.
    Apr 14 10:48 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    a64hoo - Since rest stops already don't charge "up the old wazzu" for the needs of your "wazzu", one can take your gratuitous comment on this example of possible government services as nothing more than a product of your "wazzu".
    Apr 14 08:51 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    WMARKW - On traffic lights, we agree. Medieval villages in France often have a hubcap size traffic circle which in effect is a 4-way yield. There's no point in accelerating to beat a non-existent red light, and you rarely have to come to a full stop at any corner.
    Apr 13 02:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Wyostocks - Some programs were planned to be balanced over time. Thus, they can "go broke". Other programs are based on need. Thus from welfare to defense spending, arguments will always revolve around need and cost, not about such a program "going broke".
    Apr 13 02:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Wyostocks - You have presented the stock answer of the greedy. Let the altruistic be generous to the needy. Let the greedy keep their wealth oblivious to the needs of others. At least there's no hypocrisy in presenting such a "solution", no special set of regulations sparing the wealthy to let the "job providers" do their magic.

    We are finally getting beyond the Laffer Curve, supply side, increased government revenue by means of tax deductions, voodoo economics solutions Those who are rich can now blatantly buy speech favoring the election of those who would maintain the status quo without the need of inventing excuses for taxing income by the rich at a lower level. Such is progress in the U.S..
    Apr 13 02:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Nuclear - Most dictators don't leave office after losing elections or abiding by term limits. And if one wishes to play dictator within a democratic context, a parliamentary system makes it much easier. It is difficult to reconcile denouncing someone for his lack of leadership and for being a dictator.

    There are theoretically a few not too bright students that get in to top American universities. There are a few exceptions. Sometimes, athleticism more than pays for tuition, bed and board, and exites alumni to give. In Ivy League Schools where tradition reigns, there has already been payback re will likely be more, and a few "gentlemen's C's'' students, legacies, can be brought on board without unduly tarnishing a school's image.

    However, anyone who is chosen by his peers to be head of the Harvard Law Review is not limited by being ''not too smart''.
    Apr 11 04:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Blue Okie - Every country that has a universal health care system is more generous than the U.S.. Perhaps you think that private charity is the way to go. I was looking through some of the records of our local Kiwanis Club celebrating its 75th anniversary this year. They/we used to pay for tonsillectomies for the poor. Modern countries have stopped depending on the charity of the few and institutionalized fundamental services.
    Apr 11 03:52 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    All Canadians gripe, often with good reason, about their health care system. If you want to put a smile back on their faces, suggest the American system, pre-Obama, as a worthwhile alternative.

    Yes, some Canadians go to the U.S. for quicker service. As well, rich people may decide to pay for the best. That may be the U.S. for some. For Charlie Rose, living in New York surrounded by many fine hospitals, it was France.
    Apr 11 03:43 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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