Seeking Alpha

Rich in Quebec

Rich in Quebec
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View Rich in Quebec's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Wall Street Breakfast: CVS Renames Itself Following Last Tobacco Sales [View article]
    Deer - Putin is usually his most accommodative when world leaders are meeting and might let the emotions of the moment have them put heavy sanctions on him. Let's see where the Ukraine situation is once the world leaders go home after a slap on the risk.
    Sep 3 02:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    Wyostocks and wmarkw - BlueOkie brought up the 'democracy' issue, which is indeed a red herring. All I did is point out that democracy had not prevented the use of nuclear weapons. North Korea is no democracy, but even were it a democracy, it might use them.
    Sep 3 02:17 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Google Developing Delivery Drone Fleet [View article]
    BlueOkie - Raising taxes, done alone, would indeed kill the economy, just as conservative rediscovery of the sanctity of balanced budgets has served to retard the economy's comeback.

    "Bid government" was never bigger than WWII, and government spending and taxation never higher. That worked so well that some revisionist conservatives even suggest that the New Deal was a failure and that the War was the real solution to the Great Depression. Deficit spending stimulates an economy whether done with small government or a big government view. It also takes people willing to impose high taxes on themselves even after the crisis is over to pay for all that economic stimulus.
    Aug 31 03:07 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Google Developing Delivery Drone Fleet [View article]
    I wonder how a discussion about drones would have been different if done by others other than Americans. It didn't take long that the conversation turned to guns. If done in Canada, the conversation might have been more about range and flying in winter conditions than about guns and terrorist attacks.
    Aug 31 02:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    BlueOkie - My comment was in reference to fear of North Korea because it isn't a democracy. So far, nuclear weapons have only been used by the U.S. on Japan. By that gauge only, democracies are to be feared. All sorts of countries have gone to war and justified, at least to themselves, reasons, methods and weapons used.
    Aug 31 02:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    BlueOkie - Japan was not saved by the U.S. being a democracy. I grant you that rationalizations are harder to come by in a democracy. What you hope from an unscrupulous dictatorship like North Korea, is a desire for self preservation. Those who would willingly die for greater principles are more to be feared if armed sufficiently. Fear the zealots! Understanding the difference between the zealots and the self-serving would have meant that the U.S. would never have had reason to attack Iraq.
    Aug 30 03:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Euro Sinks To 11-Month Low On ECB Outlook [View article]
    gggl - If demography (ageing and declining population) is the ultimate cause of Japan's dilemma, and now Europe is going down the same road, aren't countries like the U.S. and Canada next on the list, unless the "scourge" of immigration comes to our rescue? And if we look solely at demography, does that mean that long term investors should look at Africa - and scorn Russia?
    Aug 27 08:21 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Euro Sinks To 11-Month Low On ECB Outlook [View article]
    gggl - Funny until you think it through. No one has to do the "dirty laundry", ethnic cleansing, "buying" politicians for personal gain, etc.. Yet, in the latter case, the political system, already a product of getting "correct" laws and judicial interpretations, makes it easier for the usual rationalization, "If I don't do it, someone else will."
    Aug 27 08:11 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    Wmarkw - I was thinking in terms of per capita income. Of course, we can refine and diminish the obvious by, for instance, referencing real cost of living (generally lower in low income states), or applying rich and poor qualitatively (% of nuclear families, quality of scenery in rural vs. densily populated states, etc.. But that would be quite subjective. Do we prefer or do we penalize the billboard free state of Vermont vs. the information laden roads of billboarded America?
    Aug 27 08:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Amazon Agrees To Purchase Twitch For $970M [View article]
    BlueOkie - You play within the rules of the game, even if you oppose those rules. That is not hypocrisy. For instance, I opposed the introduction of the 3 point shot in basketball, but opposing teams quickly learned to never play zones against any team I coached if we had any kind of outside shooting ability. As for dividends, tax laws are secondary to Buffett's proven ability to reinvest the money better than the recipient of the dividend would.
    Aug 26 03:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    BlueOkie - The "equal outcomes" argument makes no sense when one compares "outcomes" of different social classes of Americans as compared to other rich Western democracies. All countries attempt to equalize the playing field. But some countries, such as the U.S., have had less success. The irony is that more of those who argue as you do are from Conservative states which tend to be poorer and thus receive a disproportionate share of federal largesse.
    Aug 26 10:33 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    Buckoux - The analysis was of the American Constitution - the pros and the cons. The point I was making was that despite the Bill of Rights, the U.S. has at times outrageously done what a reasonable interpretation of the text forbade. It has served as a tool for progress at times of relative quiet. Were it not for the Constitution, I doubt that the progress brought by Brown vs. Board of Education could have happened. To your specific point of Canadian concentration camps, yes we had them. They were just as outrageous as the American ones. As for your "solution", I wonder how anyone could rationalize sending a third generation, non-Japanese speaking child like David Suzuki, "back" to Japan.
    Aug 25 02:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    Buckoux - At least I've got you enraged enough to comment. It might eventually have you considering the point of view rather than the person presenting it.


    It would be progress for Americans to realize that the Constitution was a second imperfect response, even when done in the 18th century, to American distrust of church institutions, king, and Parliament. It was an admission that the Articles of Confederation had overdone weak government as a counter to possible institutional excesses in the "modern" complex 18th century world.

    There are, I think, three tests to any Constitution. The American Constitution, and particularly the Bill of Rights, has done exceptionally well in inspiring Americans to have a government of laws and not men, and to think of individual liberties rather than favor a fascist sacrifice of some for the betterment of the collectivity. It has even inspired other countries, Canada among them, to belatedly add a written Bill of Rights as an addition to the traditions of unwritten Common Law.

    It has increasingly failed to allow government to function effectively to address problems. Present day government gridlock to the point of "shutting down government" exemplifies the problem.


    Despite the inspiration, it has utterly failed in guaranteeing individual rights that it purports to protect. From its very beginning, it turned a blind eye to slavery (the three fifths rule would be funny if not so tragic). The gradual ethnic cleansing of native Americans was not stopped (even with Supreme Court rulings against Andrew Jackson). Habeas Corpus was suspended by Lincoln and Japanese Americans were put into Concentration camps during World War II.

    Aug 23 11:39 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Restrictions Imposed On Citigroup's Hedge Fund Sales [View article]
    Wyostocks - One can more easily question objections when they come from political opponents. When the objections come from like-minded individuals, those objections may more easily rise to the level of "ridicule". Bob was merely being the messenger, though I think that you are right that he must have been chuckling as he cited the Romney and Paul quotes. But, where is the hypocrisy in this? When one cannot counter the argument logically, it would seem that all that remains is to demean the person who brought it to light.
    Aug 23 10:58 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Argentina Looks To Swap Debt For New Notes [View article]
    Buckoux - Dreaming up theories to counter other commenters can be dangerous to your reputation. The implication of your argument is that newly "liberated" African-Americans can't survive the competition from immigrants.

    The purpose of the Immigration Act of 1965 was not to increase immigration, but to eliminate racist exclusions that had previously prevented "lesser races" from immigrating. Other western countries, such as Canada and Australia, had had similar restrictive laws and were also changing them. All these countries have done well in integrating their new population. Where they have all failed is in integrating people who had been scorned for generations and whose cultures had been damaged. Whether it be former slaves or indigenous people, either continued abuse or a lack of modernisation of former immigration laws, would have simply been the continuation of bad policy. Fortunately, there were conservatives at that time who took a principled stand and voted with progressives to eliminate abuse.

    You would likely have said then as you state now, that "society is not advanced enough to take good advantage of 'exceptional' social progressiveness."
    Aug 20 04:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
4,298 Comments
7,153 Likes