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Rich in Quebec

Rich in Quebec
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  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl - The loosening of government controls ALLOWED, not FORCED, the company to have the engineer stretch out his hours, go a little further and park up the hill from Lac Mégantic in Nantes about 10 miles north.
    Apr 8 04:14 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Dave - We have things so backward here in Canada. Our minimum wage is about 40% higher than the U.S. minimum. That means that our WalMart employees are being paid by Walmart, and their clients of course. It also means that government does not have to provide the historical basics of food, shelter, and clothing, or at least not as much. We do provide what almost all rich civilized countries now consider essential ie., cheap higher education and free health care.

    It's hard to understand why Americans might think that hard work made miserable is a good thing. After all, other Americans in other times explained away their exploitation of other human beings within the institution of slavery as being good for slaves as well as their owners. I always thought that attitude a bit depraved. But now that attitude sounds downright civilized as compared to one that would have jobs set up in such a way that ''they don't want to do that job for the rest of their lives'' and underpay them to reinforce the point.
    Apr 8 04:01 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl - Our "nutjobs" in Quebec are trying to see to it that existing Federal rules are implemented lest another Lac Mégantic disaster occur on the altar of Conservative Federal government cost savings and regulations ''modifications''.

    The 47 lives lost at Lac Mégantic occurred because of too high speed coming into the last curve in town. The real reason is long shifts, and unsafe standards allowed. The train had been parked the next hill up while the engineer went off to a hotel for a night's sleep. The brakes were badly set and the train came into Lac Mégantic ''engineerless'' with the spectacularly disastrous results that were shown worldwide.
    Apr 8 03:17 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Birder - It seems to me that IPO's and predicting market tops are related. IPO's are the equivalent of insider selling, once removed.
    Apr 8 08:41 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    James - I have a 2006 Saab 9-5 bought for $12,700 in 2009. I wasn't knocking the Jaguar, just that you were talking repair costs. You live in a big city, have a good mechanic, and a car that, if well maintained, can rise in value over time. I live in a small city, and initially knew that service was available east or west an hour away. I haven't had a Saab specific problem and have had few problems overall and they were taken care of locally. I haven't visited what used to be the old dealerships. So, do I dare take a long trip ( I did do a meandering road trip that got me as far as New Mexico, two years ago)? Will I find a savvy mechanic if the need arises? Will parts be available, in a reasonable time? The front loaded cost savings are combined with the possibility of more adventurous non-scheduled road incident.

    Oh yes, in reference to comments further down, I'm getting about 29 miles/American gallon on average. It may be apocryphal, but I like to believe that Saabs were designed to lessen the chance of finding a moose in the cabin should a collision occur.
    Apr 7 07:39 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    John - You're dismissing a concept because there is no hard and fast, living wage, which could then be attacked for being overly generous or greedy, depending on specific personal factors. I think you're beginning to succumb to the debating style of some of your fellow protagonists on the Right.

    The minimum wage in all Canadian provinces is a bit over $10. Wal-Mart has closed stores that attempted to bring in unionization, but it continues to do business here, profitably, I assume. Raising the minimum wage would be a great start to bringing about the 19th century reaction to Robber Baron America, the Living Wage.
    Apr 7 07:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    James - Let me get this straight. You own an old Jaguar and you are warning others about repairs!
    Apr 7 10:30 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl and tas - As you both know, there are lots of tried and true methods for having the vote turn out your way, from padding the rolls with the dearly departed to making it difficult to register to vote or waiting hours when you get there, etc. ad nauseam.

    We are having provincial elections here today. Unfortunately, the campaign has been "American" style, personal, negative and by far the dirtiest in memory. Since there are spending limits, TV and radio advertising has been limited. Unfortunately, we still use the first past the post British system where a plurality can win where there are more than two parties.
    Apr 7 08:59 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl - Before Americans rush to an excess of chauvinism, consider Florida in 2000.
    Apr 7 08:00 AM | 16 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Wyostocks - I was attempting to nuance an absolutist message. Individuals do NOT always spend more wisely, as you put it, "than the government ever will". Suggesting a "living wage" as a guide to a minimum wage does not mean that all wages are the same. Perhaps blinded by the fear of a repeat of the Soviet Union, the privileged and those that think they will eventually be, sometimes seem as uncaring of those around them as pre-French Revolution nobility. At least, some of them had the excuse of believing that France's great wealth discrepancy was divinely ordained.
    Apr 6 12:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Wyostocks - I don't think that individual choice is always better. To use an old fashioned example, for an individual to buy a book is good, but for a community to finance a library is better. For both, to be starved of funds because wealth and living wage jobs are unavailable, is only good policy in the short term for the rich who have "invested" in the political process . In the long run, the U.S. becomes what it used to ridicule Britain for, a half century ago, ie.,a class ridden society.
    Apr 6 11:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    BlueOkie - Certainly the country is better off with failing to reach 200,000 growth in employment than doing a steady 700,000/month job loss as in 2008. Unbelieving fear has been replaced with exasperation as funds and jobs fail to trickle down.
    Apr 5 07:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    BlueOkie - The money that is "saved" is available to the economy as you write. But the cheap cost of money demonstrates that it is badly distributed and much is not spent. Yes, this is economics 101. I remember seeing, decades ago, a Great Recession Betty Boop cartoon basically demonstrating the velocity of money, a concept easily understood in the 1930's with the alphabet soup of New Deal policies putting money in the hands of those in need who would quickly spend.
    Apr 5 07:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - I generally agree on Sally Hemmings. Had she wanted to remain in France as a free woman, rather than return to official slave status when Jefferson returned to Virginia, she could have. I don't know how well she would have been accepted in turn of the 19th century French society, but we do know that a century later, black expatriate Americans found France a welcome change from a racist U.S.. As for the Louisiana Purchase "getting rid of the French political presence in the U.S." precisely the opposite is true. The Purchase brought "nagging Gallic issues" into the U.S. rather than having those of French ancestry being on the border of the previously smaller U.S..
    Apr 5 08:28 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    BlueOkie - If you carried an M-16 in VietNam, then you realize that the M-16 was considered a light toy by the old-timers , not a real rifle like the M-14, which I think was still being used in Europe by NATO troops.
    Apr 4 12:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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