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Rich in Quebec

Rich in Quebec
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  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Bob - That's what I thought last weekend when I didn't renew TUR (I shares Turkey) expiring $42 puts and write more when the stock was at $43. It's at $47 now. Oh well!!!
    Mar 28 04:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Berbno - re the success of military stocks - As Eisenhower could have said - "Beware of shorting the military industrial complex."
    Mar 28 04:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - To make my point more clearly, the products for making war generally have limited use in civilian life, though the technology used in producing them may have great utility. Similarly, the negative by-products of war may spur innovation, such as the orthotics that Bob posted and to which you referred.

    I didn't bring up welfare. I brought up the Keynesian idea of attenuating business cycles. The slavish devotion to balancing budgets at all times tends to exacerbate cycles.

    As to the investment value of welfare vs. warfare, I still tend to prefer feeding and educating kids rather than attempting to kill them. But I may be wrong, my views colored by an all too thin veneer of civilisation.
    Mar 28 03:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Blueline - I hope for for limited intervention By the "elite central committee", except for things economic. I accept that without our modern complex society surrounding all of us that our ideas and products would have little value. So, I am happy to be fortunate enough to pay back and pay forward much more than you would accept for the benefits provided.
    Mar 28 02:27 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Bob - It is visceral. It is like the Republicans in Congress vis-à-vis Obama. Buckoux will attack us whatever we write. I take it as a badge of honor, sort of.
    Mar 28 02:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - As usual with your rebuttals to my comments, I am responding to partial quotes taken out of context. The products of war are generally of limited peacetime use. In the case of WWII spending, recession was ended by deficit spending. You are correct in indicating that the technology used to produce war materiel, had a utility for products used in peacetime.

    The key point is that Keynes was right. Prosperity can be produced from deficit spending - - - provided that the boom that is created is then countered by high taxation and/or cuts in spending. That was known and done by the "Greatest Generation". Unfortunately, there then came the supply siders, those whose free lunch policies George H.W. Bush called "voodoo economics", those who thought that tax cuts were the route to economic nirvana. We are today living through the debris of the disaster which their ideas caused.
    Mar 28 01:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Buckoux - The "swells" of all countries may falsely believe that they know it all, but they generally know more than those who have not had access to a quality education.
    Mar 28 01:39 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl - The lessons that history demonstrate always have to be put into context. As an example, conventional history has it that Roosevelt helped the U.S. out of the Great Depression by the New Deal which included deficit spending. The popular neo-con response is that the U.S. remained with a depressed economy during the 30's. The conventional response is that reverting to an attempt at a balanced budget in 1937 killed off the growth that had occurred since 1933. The popular neo-con oversimplification is that the New Deal failed and that it took WWII to get the U.S. out of recession. Well, WWII is the greatest example of U.S. deficit spending, and on products that had no peacetime application.

    It seems that the lesson you've "learned" is the wrong one. You would bring the U.S. back to Hoover era (1929-1932) economics. He had the excuse of not having been exposed to the ideas of John Maynard Keynes. He could not know that belt tightening would lead to the economic depths of 1932. But modern educated man is supposed to know better.

    You are partly and economically lethally right in one of your conclusions. "Deficit spending doesn't produce prosperity". It does provide a way out of recession. The worse thing to then do is to start a new boom and bust cycle by rewarding yourself with a tax cut, or worse, "do" a war or two while cutting taxes while quoting Dick Cheney's "Reagan showed us that deficits don't matter". It's time to balance the budget or even run a surplus.
    Mar 28 10:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    chudzikb - 1984 is so - well - 20th century. We need a 21st century sequel, one met, not with dread, as was the original, but would be met with the delight of a world's fair view of the future. We are cheap privacy whores, yearning to sell our intimacy for the least bit of a perceived reward.
    Mar 28 09:53 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Take one and Deer - I fail to see the conflict in my two paragraphs. I was putting up a defense of "properly done" testing. There have been a number of negative references to "Common Core" over time and I was just attempting to give a nuanced response to testing as a concept.

    I am glad to see that Deer practices discovery learning rather than the all too common memorize and regurgitate method. It brought to mind that in 1980, I was teaching one group of 7th grade geography, and I was criticized by the teacher teaching all other 7th grade geography classes for confusing the kids. They were learning continents and I had had them list what the curriculum called for, the FIVE continents, as in the Olympic rings. At least some had prepared for class and had memorized them. And then I confused them in telling them that I had memorized 7 continents when I was their age.

    So, what is a continent? A little prodding got them to the American geo-physical model and their discovery of Australia and Antarctica as continents. The 5 continent European model is cultural and historic with the 16th century New World being defined as the 4th continent,America. Under that model of time of European discovery, the rest of the peopled world eventually becoming the watery 5th continent, Oceanea. In that system, penguins and Antarctica don't count.

    The real lesson was that there are different methods for doing things. One is not necessarily better. But from naming continents to which side of the road to drive on, there are rules. Surviving tests or the highway necessitates knowing what is right in that society.
    Mar 27 08:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Guardian - Windsor Ontario is just across the river from Detroit and is part of our Canadian rustbelt. It has not been hit as hard as Detroit because of our social safety net that includes minimum wages equivalent to what the U.S. used to be able to pay, and health services not dependent on employment. I will not claim that "liberalism" has saved Windsor, but a cursory look at these cities, and others in our shared rustbelt, makes it utter nonsense to claim that liberalism doomed Detroit
    Mar 27 05:49 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Deer - Indeed, testing fixes nothing. But if properly done, testing tells you whether problems have been fixed. International comparative testing should tell Americans that they're not getting good value for the money spent. Is it because of something/ many things wrong with how education is done? Is it because Americans don't value education and their kids' results demonstrate it?

    If we are to believe what seems to have been a common thread in the viewpoints expressed here, many seem to resent the lack of value given to the ''trades", the carpenters and plumbers and their 21st century equivalents. I agree totally with that sentiment. Where I disagree is the follow up argument that education must be practical and job oriented. There is more to life than making money, and I would like for kids to be exposed to literature, music, the arts in general, and sports, as seemingly impractical as it may seem. If the British could at one time believe that the Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton, they had the imagination to understand what great value there was in a wide ranging education. The U.S., we are told, has too many lawyers. Perhaps it also has too many tunnel vision bookkeeper types and needs more poets and philosophers.
    Mar 27 05:29 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Blueline - Everyone agrees on government redistribution. They differ only in how much and what for.
    Mar 26 06:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Blueline - I hope that you realize that those who "refuse to participate in this redistribution of wealth scam" either will be winners and never be sick, pay their own health care directly, or if unlucky, freeload and have responsible citizenry pay for them.
    Mar 26 01:06 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Deer - I had no idea initially. So, I figured that the answer desired by this history teacher must be a famous person from the past, Rothchild, Baruch perhaps? But, teachers sometimes like to ask trick questions, so perhaps Buffet who can do more than one thing at a time. Or is it Charlie Munger? But, we live in a modern age. Why think when Google can tell me. So, having googled the quote, the surprising answer is Jim Cramer.
    Mar 26 10:48 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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