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SteveTheHawk

SteveTheHawk
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  • Dividend Growth Investing, Total Return, And Indexing Revisited [View article]
    Miguel:
    They might understand it, but they can't figure out to how make it "exciting". I think that many traders are wired and thrive on that constant banter and activity. DGI folks.... not so much.

    On the other hand, if they did push DGI, it would just make the field more crowded. It's already hard enough to find a decent price on stocks I want.

    >>IMO, what they don't understand is that they would have another whole set of viewers if they would have a decent DGI program.<<
    Nov 26, 2014. 05:51 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    troll:
    Opinions on GE are certainly wide and varied. I'm not rushing into a purchase by any means, but I do want to get a feel for the stock and come to a conclusion as to whether or not I want to own it in the future.

    The dividend is respectable, seems to be well covered and is growing nicely. If I choose to jump in further, it will likely be baby steps. A nice market correction might be helpful in that a larger margin of safety would be provided.

    Steve
    Nov 26, 2014. 05:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    Thanks, Chowder.

    Indeed, I have to consider more than just recent quarters. As you stated to mbn, if I place a bet on GE it will likely be a supporting position. Maybe 3% max.

    I had contemplated eventually building GE to a core position. I think though that I let their ancient history as an industrial powerhouse warp my thinking. I'm going to need them to prove themselves worthy of a core spot. I don't think they are there yet. Thanks for your comments.

    Steve
    Nov 26, 2014. 05:16 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    mbn:
    Thanks for your input. I can understand the negative viewpoint on GE management. I have considered that as well and it's a check mark in the negative column IMO. I haven't come to a decision on GE and am still trying to figure out what it will do going forward.

    If I decide that I want to own some of it, I then have to set a buy price. It seems a little bit pricey right now, but first things first. I need to get a handle on the research tools that I have recently gained access to. Chowder seems to like the Jefferson reports quite a bit, and I do like the way they present their information. I just don't know if I'm applying the information correctly.

    Steve
    Nov 26, 2014. 03:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    Chowder:
    I'm just starting to use the Jefferson research reports. Got a question for you. Your comment about considering a sell when things go downhill (weakest, etc) makes sense.

    Do you also tend to be more optimistic about a holding when these ratings improve? For example, I'm looking at GE right now. In the 4 most recent quarters, all the criteria except cash flow quality have been rated at the top. Cash flow quality was weak, weakest, weak and then strong (MRQ).

    I view that as an improving situation, given that cash flow affects dividend payments, etc. Would something like this give you a reason to place a check mark in the plus column when looking at a possible purchase? Thanks.

    Steve
    Nov 26, 2014. 03:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing, Total Return, And Indexing Revisited [View article]
    Miguel:
    I'm guessing it's just a viewership problem. I'm sure they want to keep people "on the edge of their seat" by keeping the action going. To do that, you have to cater to traders.

    I haven't watched CNBC in years. They offer nothing that interests me. Now if they would offer decent analysis of some DGI stocks, and tell me about the stock's valuation, cash flow and yield growth, I might give them a couple minutes of my day :-).
    Nov 26, 2014. 08:18 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Aristocrat: Johnson & Johnson [View article]
    If ever there was a DGI stock worth owning, JNJ is it. Even the best can be too expensive though and I think that's the case here. It's definitely at the high end with regard to price range and at the low end when it comes to current yield.

    JNJ is one our largest holdings and for that I'm pleased. I want to add more but will need to wait for a better value.

    Steve
    Nov 25, 2014. 10:53 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing, Total Return, And Indexing Revisited [View article]
    Dale:

    I'll pretty much ditto what Mike said. Similar to Mike, my current yield is 3.5% and on a YTD basis, div growth has increased my income by 6.7%. I have yet to find a fund that can provide the income I currently receive by holding DG stocks. Others have written articles on this topic, and they couldn't find a suitable fund either.

    I certainly wish such a fund existed. Not only would I stash my money there, but it would alleviate any angst I have in regard to survivor planning. I have to figure out what my wife (non-investor type) should do if I'm no longer able to handle financials. In that case, she might very well have to be satisfied with SDY, VIG and similar funds.

    I'm not critical of anyone who invests in funds. Nothing wrong with that. As for me, I will go with whatever provides the greatest income for as long as I'm able.

    Steve
    Nov 23, 2014. 12:46 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing, Total Return, And Indexing Revisited [View article]
    Mike:
    I think that's really the essence of investing. The goals that each of us establish will form our investing style. If growing income while preserving principal is the goal, then DGI trumps indexing.

    As for the total return crowd, it's hard to say who would win. I suppose that depends on the individual's prowess in picking stocks.
    Nov 23, 2014. 11:04 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Increase: GE On Tap To Bring Good Things To Investors [View article]
    Rich:
    You may very well be correct. I have no reason to expect any economies to boom. Muddle-through seems most likely. I agree that the div increase is not the major consideration, but it is a reason I hold GE. If the company does well, then so does the dividend.

    My hope is that cash flow continues to improve and that GE does well enough to bring that payout ratio down a little.
    Nov 23, 2014. 09:49 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Increase: GE On Tap To Bring Good Things To Investors [View article]
    I've been giving some serious thought to adding a little more GE. I was guessing the increase would push it up to 94 - 96 cents. I wouldn't be entirely dissatisfied with that. If it goes to a dollar, so much the better.

    I looked at a Jefferson Research report on GE today. I noted that their "Cash Flow Quality" rating for Q3 was "strong". The three quarters prior to that, the rating was either "weak" or "weakest". The report may not mean anything in the big picture, but it seems positive from a dividend perspective.

    Steve
    Nov 22, 2014. 08:05 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    David and David:
    I'm a total DGI novice compared to you two, so I can't profess as to the long haul success of using a yield point as part of an evaluation. However, I have been doing exactly that with JNJ, KO and PG (for example). I won't buy any of them at less than a 3% current yield.

    I first bought JNJ in 2006, KO in 2010 and PG in 2011. I classify them all as successful investment decisions. My focus is on steady dividends, but I can't complain about the overall returns either. As you already stated, I think the yield point criteria may be somewhat useful for some stocks.
    Nov 22, 2014. 07:42 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 75 Fairly Valued High Current Income Dividend Stocks For Your Retirement Portfolios: Part 2 [View article]
    Chuck:
    Allow me to join the chorus and say thank you for the article. I've been looking for places to spend some money. This list will keep me busy for a little while.

    Steve
    Nov 21, 2014. 10:09 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ModernGraham Annual Valuation Of American Electric Power Company Inc. [View article]
    Agreed, giofls. It's been in our portfolio for about 3 years and has a 5.7% YOC, along with a 54% unrealized gain. I'm content to just take in the divvy for now. I think the stock is about $10 too high at the moment. My buy price is set at $48. In that AEP's allocation is already over 3%, I'll need a little bit of a bargain before I'll want to add more.
    Nov 21, 2014. 09:12 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Stocks Are Not In A Bubble, But Many Of Them Are Pricey [View article]
    Mike:
    As part of my effort to create an investment business plan, I want to include a section for my DW as to how to handle the portfolio if I no longer can. She has no interest in looking at stocks either.

    I was giving serious thought to including something like SCHD in the plan. Have you considered this type of ETF versus a pure indexing scheme? I'm curious what your thoughts are on this topic.

    Steve
    Nov 21, 2014. 08:52 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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