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SteveTheHawk

SteveTheHawk
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  • 14 Dividend 'Champions Of Champions' [View article]
    Eric:
    Agreed. I don't like it either. Well, at least I know it's not a foul-up on my end. Thanks for the reply.
    Mar 26 02:34 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 14 Dividend 'Champions Of Champions' [View article]
    Off-topic question, but I'm not sure how else to deal with it.

    Is anyone else seeing strange formatting on the SA article pages? I've tried multiple browsers, etc, but they all look the same. It looks like headers are missing and some links don't work like they should. It's been going on for a couple days.
    Mar 26 01:15 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 14 Dividend 'Champions Of Champions' [View article]
    I tend to agree Rick. I'm quite nervous about current valuations on DG stocks these days, and am having a hard time finding buy candidates that I don't already own. I guess we'll need a rise in interest rates or some kind of market crisis before decent yields will be plentiful again.

    Our DG portfolios are about 25% in cash. My wife and I are reinvesting dividends, but keeping the cash at its current level. I feel the need to wait for better prices.
    Mar 26 10:56 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Team Alpha And The Foundations For Financial Freedom [View article]
    I tend to agree with gapwedge here. First, in order to get a deduction, you have to create an even larger expense. Spend $100 to save $30 (or $40, whatever). Then, to try and "arbitrage" this money requires knowledge of markets and the direction of rates, etc. I'm not that gifted.

    Finally, and most important for my wife and I, there is a certain peace of mind that comes with having no debt. Some years ago, we paid off our mortgage and both car loans within two months of each other. It was very strange to have zero monthly debt payments, but mostly it just felt really good.
    Mar 24 09:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Team Alpha And The Foundations For Financial Freedom [View article]
    Great article, RS. Wish I had read and paid attention to it about 20 years ago :-).

    My wife and I started our Roth accounts in 1998 and basically floundered about until I began looking at DGI in 2010. It's now my investing religion. My DW retired 2 years ago. I am pushing 60 and hope to retire within 2 years, but won't do so until our DG portfolios attain my self-imposed income goals.

    On the plus side, we have no debt, pensions and a 401K, so we should be able to skip the whole poverty thing (I hope). As you cite, it will help significantly when we are both able to draw SS. When that day comes, I hope to spend that income and continue on with re-investing all dividends in our Roth accounts. After all, the best kind of income is tax-free income.

    Thanks for the article. I've archived it and will use it the next time a youngster chats with me about retirement.
    Mar 24 11:40 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Dividend Growth Scorecard [View article]
    Nice article. I like the idea of using this type of scorecard for stock selection. I might have to steal some of your ideas for use on my own portfolios.
    Mar 22 01:56 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Keeping Your Dividend Stocks Right Now Is Not A Mistake [View article]
    User:
    I tend to agree. I bought a small amount of KO with the intention of building up our holdings. The price went up quickly, then I sat around for a long time, stubbornly waiting for my desired 3% current yield. I guess KO doesn't hit that mark very often, so I'm just buying small amounts on the dips. It's obvious that I have little knowledge of when companies like this will rise or fall in price. All I know is that I need to make them a core part of my portfolio.
    Mar 22 10:48 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Investors - Don't Just Stand There - Do Something [View article]
    Bob:
    That's kind of where I'm at. I don't wish to ever dip into our stock holdings for living expenses, and view dividend income as a nice supplement to our pensions and future SS income.

    I'm also debating what to do with some of our current lower yield holdings. WAG is one example. I bought it about 15 months ago and the capital gain now equates to almost 14 years of dividends at the current yield. On the other hand, the dividend growth rate is in excess of 20%.

    Part of me wants to grab the gains while I can. The other side wants to just do nothing and let the dividends grow. I suppose that I should consider whether or not I could deploy the funds elsewhere and get a better yield along with a nice growth rate. I have my doubts about that, but maybe I just haven't come across the right stock yet. Perhaps I should sell it and just sit on the cash while waiting for a market dip. Decisions, decisions.
    Mar 22 10:36 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • AT&T: Brace For An Intermediate-Term Decline [View article]
    Bought T for our Roth accounts almost 2 years ago, just for the dividend. We have a lovely 6.3% YOC. I can live with that.
    Mar 21 11:46 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Your Bond Allocation For 2013: It's Time To Lower Your Risk [View article]
    James:
    We have moved a little money into ST bond funds (BSV, CSJ and VCSH). In total, we have about 20% of our accounts in these funds, 25% in cash and the rest in div stocks. I'm not sure I want to up the bond fund holdings. I think that for now I will just sit on the cash and wait for a better deal on some div stocks.

    Steve
    Mar 20 04:20 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Your Bond Allocation For 2013: It's Time To Lower Your Risk [View article]
    I lean in the same direction. My wife and I are about 25% cash in our combined Roth accounts. I desperately want to buy more div stocks but for the most part, valuations concern me. I might have to learn to be happy earning no interest on that money for a while. I guess a zero return is better than a negative return.
    Mar 20 09:11 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Smackdown: Dividends vs Annuities, The Main Event [View article]
    All very valid points Petyaczar, and dead-on accurate. The tax issue would bother me endlessly. All of our dividend income will be coming from Roth accounts, which is a huge tax advantage.

    In my mind though, I would stop my analysis of annuities when I realized that I would have to turn over a lot of money to an insurance company. My thinking is that nobody cares more about my money than I do. Insurance companies are far more concerned with turning my money into their money.
    Mar 18 10:58 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Verizon (VZ) has joined Cablevision in wanting a shakeup of the pay-TV industry's structure: Big Red says it's talking with several "midtier and smaller" TV network owners about paying for channels based on how many subscribers watch, rather than the number of covered homes. Verizon's efforts, which it says would allow it to offer a bigger lineup of niche channels, aren't as dramatic as Cablevision's attempts to end to channel bundling. But they still underscore industry discontent with having to pay per-user fees for less popular channels from media giants such as Viacom (VIA) and Disney (DIS), regardless of viewing activity. [View news story]
    As a consumer, I suppose it would be nice to be able to pick and choose channels. We have over 200 channels at home and watch maybe 20% of them. Somehow though, even if ala carte becomes a reality, I suspect the price for each channel will increase to the point that the monthly bill won't decrease at all.
    Mar 18 10:46 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Bank Of America Has Failed Shareholders [View article]
    I sold BAC back when it was around $40 and haven't looked at it since. I guess that in my mind, I don't differentiate as to the reasons for not raising the dividend. I just view BAC as being a non-starter for DG investors.
    Mar 17 12:33 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 5 ETFs For Retirement Income For Less Active Investors [View article]
    Thank you, RS:
    I'm in the process of of trying to develop what others have called "letters from your dead husband". Basically, I manage the household finances, including our Roth accounts which contain individual DG stocks. If something happens to me, I fear that my wife would be a deer in the headlights and I want her to know specifically what to do if that day comes.

    Rather than expect her to monitor or evaluate stocks (even the biggest stalwarts need to be watched), I'm leaning toward a handful of ETF's. Your article will prove helpful when trying to formulate a plan.

    Steve
    Mar 14 02:35 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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