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SteveTheHawk

SteveTheHawk
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Latest comments  |  Highest rated
  • Why I Will Buy Target Corporation's Stock This Week [View article]
    A bigger problem is that if one is paying attention, there should be no trust in using a credit card anywhere... not just Target. The breaches are popping up everywhere, and those are just the ones we know about.

    Until the security on all credit cards is enhanced, the problem isn't going away. That (chip and PIN technology) will be an expensive proposition though. In the meantime, I view the breach at Target as a problem that will eventually blow over. I don't think Target's security is worse or better than any other store.
    Feb 6 01:09 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Stocks For 2014: Fairly Valued Dividend Growth Stocks With An Emphasis On Dividends - Part 4 [View article]
    Stox:
    I appreciate where you are coming from. I do have to say though that all these things you mention add layers of complexity that many investors can't understand or just don't want to deal with. It also steps into the realm of market timing.

    I'm not being the least bit critical of your techniques and/or opinions. Speaking personally, I have no interest in options or shorts. I'm a simple dividend growth investor. I buy the stock and I collect the divvy's. If I don't get the dividend, I don't want the stock. I do own a small bag of bond ETF's, but that's just a simple allocation decision, not really a hedge technique.

    Chuck's articles speak volumes to me just as they are, and I don't feel it important that he go into allocation, market timing or hedging techniques. Just my $.02.
    Jan 31 12:38 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Our Retirement Income Portfolio And Its 3rd Quarter Review [View article]
    "The 4% rule that I have read about includes dividends as part of the withdraw, and capital gains for whatever dividends do not cover. "

    IMHO, the whole idea behind DGI is to not use capital gains for income. It's a dividend thing, with a goal of never touching principal. Capital gains require a stock sale, reducing dividend income, etc. Yeah, I'm laying out a perfect world scenario, but that's my ultimate goal.
    Oct 25 08:26 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is The 4% Rule Becoming The 3% Rule? [View article]
    Nice story, Myer. My wife and I started into DGI in our Roth accounts a couple years ago. We will likely never receive enough income to live on, but we do hope it will be enough to nicely supplement our pensions and SS. When I retire in a year or two, I plan to roll my 401K to an IRA and buy up DG stocks with that too. That should help as well.

    I laughed at your post because I told a financial person basically the same thing as you. I explained that we don't plan to ever touch the principal in our div accounts. I got this very strange look in return. Kind of a cross between disbelief and confusion. They apparently couldn't grasp the concept of DGI. Either that or they couldn't figure out how to sell me something using that approach.
    Feb 28 10:12 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Patience When Investing Gets You The Big Candy Bar [View article]
    I didn't get that out of the article at all. I took it to mean that dividend growth investors may not want to buy on the good news like so many traders do. Rather, it pays to wait for an entry point created by a slump in earnings or analyst downgrade (assuming it's a solid company otherwise). This creates a larger of margin of safety, not to mention a larger current yield.
    Jan 14 04:11 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Difficulties Of Dividend Investing And 2 Possible Solutions [View article]
    People who are "obsessed" with dividend income generally want income that comes in on a continual basis, simple as that. Of course, one hopes that the income will ratchet up over time as well (dividend growth). The idea is not to sell. The idea is to receive a steady stream of income.

    To each their own with regard to investing style. Some don't care about dividends and others seek them out. Count me in the latter camp.
    Jun 9 08:21 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Exxon Mobil: The 'Iron Skillet' Of Investments [View article]
    I wish I could say that we owned stocks that had been held for generations. Sadly, my parents/grandparents never owned a single stock. I'm the first generation that has tried to learn about such things. It's been a bumpy road but I think I'm finally getting the hang of it now that I'm approaching 60. :-)
    Apr 2 12:23 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Johnson & Johnson: A Great Dividend But Not Much Else [View article]
    I'm basically more concerned with preventing large losses than I am with netting large gains so yeah, JNJ works for me.
    Dec 16 06:16 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Portfolio For Do It Yourselfers - An Update [View article]
    Great article David. It's useful to read articles on the how and the theories on dividend investing, but real life examples drive the point home. Keep up the good work.
    Dec 2 06:21 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Stocks Perfect For Retirees - Part 3 [View article]
    Alance:
    The fact that you are paying such close attention and planning for retirement at 24 years of age is admirable. Wish I had read SA and payed attention when I was 24. Guess that would have been difficult though since PC's were a new concept and the internet didn't exist :-).

    In the end, you may not need much more than just "basic principles". It's the complex stuff that gets you in trouble. This site provides an awesome opportunity to learn. Some smart people hang out here.

    Ease into it and stick with solid financial planning principles. I'm guessing you will have a better than average chance at retiring very comfortably before you are 65.
    Sep 25 07:57 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Jim Cramer Is Not Bullish About These Stocks Anymore [View article]
    I suppose it depends on why one is investing. For a dividend/income investor, some of these stocks are quite desirable in my opinion. I also don't have a clue just how successful Cramer is as an investor, but somehow I feel that much of what he says on his show has to be taken with a grain of salt.
    Jun 23 06:31 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How to Live Off Dividends in Retirement [View article]
    I'm certainly glad that we don't have to live off only our dividend income in that our portfolios aren't nearly large enough. However, I'm still a fan of dividend stocks. As we approach retirement in the near future, we'll be using dividend income to provide a nice supplement to other sources of income (401K, pensions, and eventually SS).

    My only regret is that we didn't start this process many years ago. It took me a long time to realize the logic of dividend investing. I was too busy trying to find stocks that would shoot up in value. I discovered that I'm not good at that sort of thing. Sigh.
    May 29 11:40 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Judge: Goldman Should 'Suffer' [View article]
    No doubt. It's the equivalent of me paying a parking ticket.
    Dec 4 11:25 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 45 Attractive Dividend Growth Stocks In Today's Overheated Stock Market - Part 1 [View article]
    Mike:
    Very well stated. You gave a great example of realistic expectations. I also started about 3 years ago, though I'm older than you. I retire in about 3 weeks :-).

    Even so, I expect dividend income to enhance our pension and SS income quite nicely. Pretty much once a week I want to bang my head on the wall for not starting this process sooner. But.... I would just have to spend more money on Motrin.

    Steve
    Oct 13 03:17 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Exxon Mobil Currently 17.6% Undervalued Based On Dividend Discount Model [View article]
    Realtoi:
    I too was waiting for a 3% current yield before adding to XOM. However, I looked at a 10 year yield chart and was somewhat disheartened. According to the chart I looked at, XOM's highest yield was in 2010, at 2.94%.

    Today, XOM's current yield is 2.93%. For one, that matches the high that I observed on the yield chart. Second, I think it's close enough to my desired 3% yield.

    Like you, I am near retirement.... just over a month away. XOM is about 3.5% of our portfolio's NAV. I'm trying to build my core to full strength and at this point that means a 6-8% allocation. I may be a bit early but I'm going to buy tomorrow and notch XOM up another percent or two. If it continues downward, I'll have room to buy a bit more. If it trends up, I'll be glad that I bought. I need to add to core positions and XOM figures prominently in that goal. If the current yield goes much over 3%, I'll likely kick myself a little, but I'll still buy more.

    Steve
    Sep 25 08:29 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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