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Snoball

Snoball
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  • 3 Reasons To Own National Presto Industries [View article]
    It's Cohen not Cowen.
    Aug 19, 2014. 10:59 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CME to boost transaction fees in 2014 [View news story]
    Members rates up 20%, non-members up 8%!
    Guess they don't want members.
    Nov 12, 2013. 04:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • CME Group is upgraded to Hold from Sell at JPMorgan, a few weeks late to the realization that volatility in interest rates should reignite trading in the exchange's cobwebed-over Eurodollar pits. The stock's up about 18% in the last month against the S&P's 5% decline. [View news story]
    And the another "Giant" of investing, Goldman Sachs, did the same thing yesterday. They missed the move from 50 to 78, and expect investors to take them seriously?
    Here's a challenge. Publish your picks in real time! Let's see how the analysts really do.
    Jun 25, 2013. 09:33 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Fix The Fiscal Mess [View article]
    I've always wondered why this "stimulus" wasn't done more efficiently. One trillion sent directly to each of 330 million citizens is ~$3000. Surely this kind of stimulus, spent directly in the fashion many need (and some want) , would help the economy better than the NYC-Washington directed system.
    Feb 4, 2013. 05:40 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is The Fed Doing? I Love Ben Bernanke [View article]
    Tack,

    You didn't answer my question. Why not simply loan to every American the equivalent of our national debt? Under your theory, it would solve two problems. One, it would stabilize our economy from the effects of deflation and two, it would reduce the deficit by returning to the Treasury our debt payments.
    I might add, by loaning the money directly, it would be spent very democratically. People would send the "lost currency" where it is most needed.

    Snoball
    Oct 30, 2012. 09:50 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is The Fed Doing? I Love Ben Bernanke [View article]
    Tack,

    Do you really believe the Fed has an unlimited balance sheet that is meaningless? If so, why stop with their current purchases? Why not buy everything? My suggestion would be to send every person in America a $50,000 loan @ 1%. That would, coincidentally, cost $16T, but make $160B a year that could be returned to Treasury.
    Oct 29, 2012. 10:43 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • In Defense Of U.S. Treasuries (Or Debunking An Ideological Rant) [View article]
    Asbytec,

    Can't find a third argument.
    Jul 26, 2012. 02:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In Defense Of U.S. Treasuries (Or Debunking An Ideological Rant) [View article]
    I'm forced to argue for a better Fed or none at all.

    But let me ask you: What would you have policy makers do?
    Jul 26, 2012. 11:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In Defense Of U.S. Treasuries (Or Debunking An Ideological Rant) [View article]
    Larry,

    Re: "What are we deciding to do or not do? Are you saying that we should act AS IF we were revenue constrained because we can't trust ourselves with the knowledge that we are not? The punchline "Can I do it until I need glasses?" comes to mind."

    We are deciding if we can debase the currency just the right amount.
    Too little and we don't get much bang. Too much and we suffer inflation, or in the extreme, hyperinflaton. It's not an academic argument for the average American consumer. It's a life or death situation for those living on fixed incomes.
    Jul 26, 2012. 11:05 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • In Defense Of U.S. Treasuries (Or Debunking An Ideological Rant) [View article]
    Thank you Larry. I appreciate your comment.
    My observation is their is little difference between insolvency and hyperinflation.
    I guess I would agree if I had confidence in the ability of the Fed to read demand/supply correctly. I haven't seen enough evidence of that ability, and I worry the markets are being "gamed".
    Jul 26, 2012. 09:14 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • In Defense Of U.S. Treasuries (Or Debunking An Ideological Rant) [View article]
    Re: "This is not to rule out the possibility of severe inflation, even hyperinflation, if too much currency is printed. But that is exactly what was said -- the U.S. can never go "broke" in the traditional sense of the term. It can potentially destroy the value of its currency, but that is something different."

    So what's the difference?
    Jul 25, 2012. 09:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Big Pharma Stocks Have Been Performing Poorly And Why AstraZeneca Is A Buy [View article]
    Gummy,

    Thanks for the reply.
    But isn't it worth the chance Mr. Market is mistaken. No downside and (potentially) huge upside?
    Jun 1, 2012. 03:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Big Pharma Stocks Have Been Performing Poorly And Why AstraZeneca Is A Buy [View article]
    I've noticed the Jan 2014 $40 put is ~$6.40. That's about 15% of the share value. That's also ~ what you will collect in dividends between now and January 2014. This seems to good to be true! Can you nit use the dividend to fund 100% downside protection and "reserve" all the upside? The only risk seems to be a dividend cut. As the article mentions, the dividend seems well covered.

    Any comments?
    May 31, 2012. 12:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "People need to study their facts" before criticizing speculators, CME chairman Terry Duffy says in response to Pres. Obama's blaming traders for driving fuel prices higher. Speculators provide vital liquidity to markets: "When the Dow goes above 13,000, Google goes above $600/share and everybody celebrates, who do you think did that? The U.S. equity market is 100% speculators."  [View news story]
    I'd love a definition of excessive speculation. And...who's the speculator, the guy selling futures on the way up ( and losing money in the process) or the buyer?
    If it were so easy speculating to wealth, why would speculators ever let the prices come down? This is more an issue of human folly than excessive speculation and the obvious truth is reflected in no outcry when prices fall.
    May 2, 2012. 03:08 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Ballad Of Greg Smith [View article]
    dR. v,

    I apologize if you think I put words in your mouth. You used phrases like "mom and pop" and "not a retail bank for the minions" which lead me to believe you think GS is justified to not disclose conflicts because their clients are sophisticated. I thought it was a logical conclusion but I don't mean to offend.
    I doubt we have a different perspective on GS or it's investment strategy. We simply differ in their justification which you defend with

    "ANYTIME you invest, the due diligence onus is on you, if you let someone bend you over the table, shame on you, not them."

    As for Mr. Smith. It's true he took the money but you ignore that he's not taking it any more in a very public way. You see him as a self-cast victim (Freewill?) and I see him as simply fed up.
    Mar 18, 2012. 11:09 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
21 Comments
25 Likes