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rnsmth

rnsmth
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  • Why You Should Consider CVS Instead Of Walgreen [View article]
    When I purchased WAG, in October 2012, the yield was right at 3%. I would not purchase it today because the yield is below the minimum that I will consider for a new purchase, but I will continue reinvesting dividends. I did trim the position recently and used the proceeds to add to SO (with its 4.8% yield).

    Current total return for my WAG position is 107% and I am pleased with it. CVS also does not meet my minimum current yield for a purchase, so I will not consider it.
    Jul 10, 2014. 10:04 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What's Your (Dividend Growth) Number?: Part 4 - Creating And Surpassing Goals [View article]
    Syquest was mine :)
    Jul 10, 2014. 07:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Utility Investors Are Likely To Get Scorched In The 2nd Half Of 2014 [View article]
    I have some eREITS paying 5-8%. Will not own and mREIT. Have one MLP that yields a bit over 7%, APU. Not interested in BDC's at this point.

    So, you have no utilities that make that kind of payout, is that right?
    Jul 10, 2014. 03:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Utility Investors Are Likely To Get Scorched In The 2nd Half Of 2014 [View article]
    Buying for dividend and dividend growth. Which ones pay 10-15%?
    Jul 10, 2014. 03:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Utility Investors Are Likely To Get Scorched In The 2nd Half Of 2014 [View article]
    All of mine are paying 3.45 to 4.71% - and increasing their dividends annually

    AVA, LNT, D, NGG, SO, WEC

    Which ones do you hold that are only paying 2-3%?
    Jul 10, 2014. 02:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What's Your (Dividend Growth) Number?: Part 4 - Creating And Surpassing Goals [View article]
    PAYX - 8.6% dividend increase announced today
    Jul 10, 2014. 01:49 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Where Are The Digital Shorts Now? [View article]
    re: ARCP - it is possible, but when I had money to add I used it to open a position in APU instead.
    Jul 10, 2014. 11:48 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Where Are The Digital Shorts Now? [View article]
    The additional purchase of DLR I made this past December is now up a bit over 30%

    My initial position, purchased in February 2013 is down 1%, after having been down a whole lot.

    I am glad I held and glad I added in December.
    Jul 10, 2014. 10:00 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Buy More High-Yielding Stocks In Order To Retire Early? [View article]
    Well Robert, I could have read it or heard it someplace else, so feel free to use it without attribution
    Jul 10, 2014. 08:48 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Just How Risky Is Dividend Growth Investing? [View article]
    <<It's quite possible that dividend growth investors will underperform an S&P 500 index fund in the next decade because the premium being paid for dividend stocks relative to the S&P 500 is the highest in history.>>

    Underperform in what way? I'd guess their income and their dividend growth will beat the index.
    Jul 9, 2014. 11:35 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Buy More High-Yielding Stocks In Order To Retire Early? [View article]
    LarryMelman,

    I agree with you. You are missing some stuff. Other stuff you seem to be purposefully ignoring for reasons unknown to me.

    A multi-position portfolio, I have written in the past, is like a symphony. Each company in it has a role to play and together they make beautiful, income producing music. WAG is one of high dividend growers in my symphony, with a chowder number (5 year dividend CAGR + current yield) of 25. Not bad.

    I also have some high yielders, like SDRL, O, OHI, SO, APU and others. Diversity of yield points and dividend growth rates within a portfolio is good, in my view. WAG may not be an appropriate stock in your portfolio, but it works in mine for now. As I told you, but you seem to miss, I have trimmed it and put the proceeds into a higher yielding company.
    Jul 9, 2014. 10:37 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Buy More High-Yielding Stocks In Order To Retire Early? [View article]
    << What am I missing? >>

    I don't know Larry. What are you missing?
    Jul 9, 2014. 09:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investing: Is It A Strategy Of Cliches? [View article]
    <<Well, that's the issue with picking any individual stocks; you never know when they will become of "bad quality".>>

    If you do an adequate job of monitoring your holdings, there are often signs of trouble before they become of bad quality and have a negative impact on your returns. With a roughly equally weighted of 40 or more stocks, one one stock is going to "crush" your returns, even if you get a negative surprise.
    Jul 9, 2014. 08:57 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Buy More High-Yielding Stocks In Order To Retire Early? [View article]
    <<rnsmith was initially talking about being happy with the income level increasing to .315 per quarter.>>

    Larry, I reported the > 14% dividend income increase from WAG and asked if inflation was higher than that. I was responding to a post that confused me by someone who asserted that a relatively low yield would not keep up with inflation. The fact is, I am happy with greater than 14% dividend increases. It is also a fact also is that I wrote that I trimmed WAG and use those funds to buy a utility with a current yield far higher than that - and that I said the share price appreciation that WAG has experienced since my purchase was part of the reason that I held it. You could have used those facts in your inference also, but chose not to.

    Here are my words, quoted below, about the dividend increase.

    For example, I bought WAG in 2012 when it had a 3% yield. Current yield is 1.8%. Since I bought it the quarterly dividend increased from .275 to .315, and increase of over 14%. Was inflation higher than that?
    Jul 9, 2014. 07:25 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Just How Risky Is Dividend Growth Investing? [View article]
    <<This suggests the possible risk and failure of buy-and-hold dividend strategies. A dividend-growth stock strategy needs to be compared to a widely diversified portfolio of stocks, bonds, hard assets, and cash over a long time period with portfolio re-balancing. This may show the failure of buy-and-hold dividend-stock strategies over more comprehensive portfolio strategies. It may also show how much to buy, sell, or hold and when.  >>

    Here is the thing. Many dividend growth strategies are not buy and hold strategies. Most companies, Kodak included, signal when troubles are ahead. Some times that signal is reduced dividend growth rates, revenues, earnings, and other fundamental factors.

    I think a buy and monitor, sell and replace dividend growth strategy is superior to a buy and hold dividend strategy. Such a strategy does not need to be compared to a widely diversified portfolio including all the things you mentioned in your comment. It does need to be compared to the goals of the individual investor.
    Jul 9, 2014. 01:17 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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