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rnsmth

rnsmth
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  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    <<I am uncomfortable operating in an environment bereft of information. I cannot understand how a DGI investor initially selects stocks for inclusion in a portfolio or analyzes current holdings and/or candidate holding to adjust the portfolio for optimum performance, given lack of reliance on performance data.>>

    All of us are uncomfortable operating in an environment bereft of information, though it is clear that the information needs of various discussants vary.

    I suggest you consider the writings of Herbert Simon, Nobel prize winning social scientist, particularly his writings on decision-making and satisficing decision.

    Most humans do not seek optimum performance, in fact a definition of such would be difficult to formulate. Most of us have goals and measure our progress against our goals though.

    Let me also suggest that you remove some of the dismissive and insulting tone from many of your posts. That step would encourage rather than inhibit discussion.
    Nov 10, 2014. 10:28 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Valuations And Goals [View instapost]
    For me it is an undervalued position that will return to fair value. I am holding RCI and reinvesting dividends.
    Nov 9, 2014. 09:04 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Do You Have The Patience To Be A Successful Value Investor? [View article]
    <<At that time there was no Apple PC yet. >>

    Compaq was founded in 1982, Apple in 1977.
    Nov 9, 2014. 03:12 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: One Basic Flaw Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    I am looking at it (TUP), have not made a decision on it. Often, doing nothing is the smartest move :), and I am not feeling the need to do anything.
    Nov 9, 2014. 11:15 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: One Basic Flaw Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Not boring at all, Mike.

    Taking a closer look at TUP this morning. It might be exciting :).
    Nov 9, 2014. 10:13 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: One Basic Flaw Of Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    I do not play poker. I used to watch it and even bought and read some books about Texas Hold'em, thinking I might some day. I have a dandy set of poker chips in the closet :)

    I do not find dividend growth investing particularly boring but, for another retirement hobby (in addition to DGI) I invest in fairly long-dated options in a particular fruit company (remember Captain Dan in Forrest Gump). About 17% of our portfolios currently in those strategies.
    Nov 9, 2014. 07:33 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    <<nteresting. An MBA/CFA with years of training and experience, constant access to top management, access to the best analytical tools and unlimited technical support would find it challenging to "monitor" 30+ positions in diverse market segments, yet you do it successfully as an avocation.


    To what do you attribute your success? >>

    Competence.
    Nov 8, 2014. 05:56 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 3: Dividend Growth Ideas And Valuations [View article]
    TX:

    I would think about subscribing to Morningstar's Dividend Investor newsletter, and reading the current and past few issues of it. There are companies that are currently below M*'s fair value estimate that are held in the two portfolios that Josh Peters, the editor, runs. These are real portfolios with real money and holdings.

    Not the end all or be all, to be sure, but I have made far more than the annual subscription fee - a bit under $200 a year, I think, and consider it a worthwhile expense.
    Nov 8, 2014. 03:20 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    So, you do not care to put in writing what you consider to be more objective strategies and the reasons you consider those strategies more objective.

    Why didn't you just say so?
    Nov 6, 2014. 11:41 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    Advice? Our course of action was clear - scrape together every penny possible and put it in the market, which is what we did in 2008 and every year from then until we retired in late 2012. Now we are merely re-investing all our dividends and anticipate doing so for another decade or so before we start taking some as cash.
    Nov 6, 2014. 11:25 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    <<That being said those espousing what is characterized as DGI seem less open to discussion than adherents of more objective strategies>>

    What are these "more objective" strategies?
    Nov 6, 2014. 10:37 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Happened To The Dividend Growth Investor Who Didn't Cut And Run [View article]
    <<Not so much Kodak, for instance.>>

    Unless, perhaps, you got shares of Eastman Chemical when it was split off in 1994 and you held them.

    Have you looked at that?
    Nov 6, 2014. 01:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Valuations And Goals [View instapost]
    I just seem to make money. Total return has been great over the past two years - don't let that make you feel smart, you are probably like me and not that smart.

    As long as dividends are being increased, you only need to be smart when you buy.

    Did I mention making money?

    I try not to fluctuate when I am on a date at a movie theatre :)

    Income is increasing. Total return will probably fluctuate. See, I can use hard words like fluctuate. Maybe I are kindy smart after all :-).

    Nope, I just foller smart folks like chowder :-)

    I try not to fluctuate when I am on a date.
    Nov 5, 2014. 03:52 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Third Quarter Portfolio Review: Continuing To Build Dividend Growth And Quality [View article]
    Great job (as usual) Bob!!

    I do not do a formal quarterly portfolio review. I do pay some attention to the 30companies we own, but it is more on an ongoing basis.
    Nov 5, 2014. 09:55 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett And Ordinary Stocks [View article]
    <<The point was to show that total return is all that matters up until the time you start using that income.>>

    I have a portfolio of 30 dividend growth stocks (and one emerging dividend growth stock) that account for 83% of our portfolios. It is doing very well in terms of total return. These are all positions initiated in the past two years.

    Five of them have total returns greater than 50% (one, OHI, is over 80%)

    Another seven of them have total returns greater than 30%.

    Two of them have negative total returns, on of 11% and one of 8%.

    I did not purchase these companies to provide total return, I bought them to provide income and income growth. I am not withdrawing the income, I am reinvesting it into the companies that generated it via DRIPS. To me that is not the same as "not using it." That is using it to enhance future income flows.

    The other 17% of the portfolio is in an aggressive growth strategy that is also working very well. It is one I used with most of the portfolios from 2009-mid 2012 and it worked very well then. Once we ascertained that we could generate the income (and projected income) we might need with the 87% of the portfolio, I was freed by the better half to use a portion of our money in this other strategy. It makes for a good retirement gig.

    Total return is not all that matters, though it does matter. The extent to which it matters depends on what the individual investor's goals are and what metrics the individual investor has selected to measure progress toward the accomplishment of those goals.
    Nov 5, 2014. 08:44 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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