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rnsmth

rnsmth
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AAPL, ABT, AGNC, AMRE, ARCP, AVB, BAX, BMO, BOH, BX, CBRL, CLX, COP, CPL, CSCO, CTL, CVX, D, DD, DLR, DRI, DUK, ED, FTR, GE, GG, GIS, GOOD, GOV, HAS, HCP, HE, IBM, INTC, JNJ, KMB, KMI, KMP, KO, KRFT, LAG, LLY, MCD, MKTX, MO, MSFT, NLY, NTIOF, O, OHI, PAYX, PEP, PG, REG, RY, SDRL, SDY, SE, SEP, SNH, SO, SPY, STAG, T, TGT, TUP, UN, UTX, VIG, VOD, VZ, WAG, WEC, WFC, WFM, WM, WMT, WU
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  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    In the comment you were replying to with your question about weightings, he wrote this

    "I do try to keep all of my positions as equally weighted as possible, but not my sectors."

    7 equally weighted positions would not be most of his money

    << You have most of your money in AVA SO PNY PG KO PEP KMB, but less in MO PM, and even less in INTC et al?>>
    Jul 1 04:41 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    I suggest you go to chowder's profile and see what he is invested in.
    Jul 1 04:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Will Pepsi's Dividend Look Like In 5 Years? [View article]
    If you go from the 2.105 PEP paid in 2012 to the estimated 2.99 it will pay in 2017 (via David Fish's spreadsheet), that would be 7.35% CAGR for the dividend (using those as the starting and ending values over a 5 year period with Investopedia's CAGR calculator).

    Using the same methode for KO yields a 8.31% CAGR for the dividend.

    Both sound okey-dokey to me. This is the first time I have used the estimated dividend growth columns from the Champions spreadsheet
    Jul 1 12:13 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    <<This seems contradictory, why do you keep stocks in your consideration list between 2.5%-3% if you only buy stocks with at least 3% yield? Maybe I'm not understanding that sentence. >>

    I can tell you why I do.

    There are companies I would like to own that may be near my minimum yield target. Stocks regularly seem to dip in price. If I see no fundamental reason for the dip - then I might open a position if such a dip took the dividend yield for that company above my minimum level for opening a new position.

    A similar thing occurs with share price. Last year I picked up MCD, PG and some others when news took the prices down beyond what I thought was reasonable - with MCD is was a disappointment in a monthly same store sales report.

    If one is going to buy quality, financially strong companies that are either under valued or fairly valued it helps to have them on a consideration list or watch list
    Jul 1 10:31 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    Maybe you could do one, SDS
    Jun 30 08:42 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Kraft Foods Feeds Your Pocket With Dividends [View article]
    When are they going to announce their dividend increase?
    Jun 30 07:30 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    Chowder has written about his portfolio during the Great Recession. Dave Crosetti is another person who was invested then. You might be able to do a bit of searching and see how they did
    Jun 30 02:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    Well, we talked some about caring for aging parents and did not delve too much more deeply into investments. :)
    Jun 30 02:35 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Up 14% Year To Date, Clorox Seems Very Expensive [View article]
    CLX is on the watch list. It is a company I would love to buy on a pullback. Maybe there will be an opportunity to, maybe not.

    Many fish (dividend growth stocks) in the sea.

    Being up 14% means it is underperforming the S&P this year, by a small amount
    Jun 30 01:23 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    My short answer for my investment strategy is:

    No, it is not time to consider a new investment strategy
    Jun 30 12:32 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Thinking About Writing [View instapost]
    Hi Bob.,
    Thank you. I'll have to find the time first :), maybe after retirement
    Jun 30 12:25 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retired Investors: Is It Time To Consider A New Investment Strategy? [View article]
    DVK,

    I was on a plane ride from the left coast to the midwest in early June. My seatmate noticed I was reading The Single Best Investment on my iPad. She asked me:

    Do you know about the 40 Best Dividend Stocks for 2013 :)

    I told her I did. Then she asked me if I knew about SeekingAlpha
    Jun 30 11:39 AM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Your Retirement Income Is On Sale [View article]
    This is a good and interesting/important discussion.

    I have a several different kinds of investments, as does my wife. One key one are the years of our lives we worked in higher education and the defined benefit pensions we will receive as a result of that work. A second is a social insurance program run by the US government, the Social Security system. If I was younger, I would question how that might work out, but at the age of 61 I am confident that we will receive monthly checks.

    The third kind are investments in stocks, bonds, money market funds and private equity funds. The stocks are all in our self-managed IRAs. It consist of a 25 position dividend growth portfolio. The bonds and private equity fund investments are in the defined contribution part of our hybrid pension plan. It is called the Individual Account Plan (IAP). Since its inception in Jan, 2004, it has a CAGR of of 6.85 through the end of 2012 - and that includes being down 27% in 2008.

    The decision I have to make is whether to roll my IAP balance over to my IRA in a lump sum or whether to do it over a 5 year period of monthly payouts. I lean toward the lump sum - but it feels kind of nice to have 20% of that money in private equity funds, an option not available to me as an individual investor. I am leaning toward the lump sum rollover.

    Oh the last investment bunch we have is in a 457 plan - it is similar to the FSP, and it is the account that I poured as much money as possible in when 2008 hit. I figured it that was not the buy low part of the cycle, we would have company in the lifeboat. This spring I moved it into the money market fund option. It had achieved good returns over the previous 4 years, being mostly invested in the Large Growth category and it will provide for our cash needs over the next few years.

    That is our financial landscape. I plan to have enough cash in the accounts to protect our dividend growth portfolio from the need to sell shares. I plan to add to that portfolio after we retire and get a better sense of how our plan does when it hits reality.
    Jun 30 10:34 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • A Mid-Year Epiphany For Income Investors [View article]
    <<Income investors was probably too vague, but since various pockets of the income world got hit rather substantially, that's what I settled on>>

    Whose income declined substantially? What companies announced dividend cuts in the past month?
    Jun 29 06:48 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Mid-Year Epiphany For Income Investors [View article]
    Buyandhold

    I like your comment. I do not think it takes an epiphany. I think most realistic investors know that drops are going happen.

    Buying financially strong companies (hopefully at a discount to fair value) does work well. Increasing dividend income during those periods of fairly severe share price downturns, like during the Great Recession of 2008, validates the strategy, in my opinion.
    Jun 29 04:12 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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