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rnsmth

rnsmth
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AAPL, ABT, AGNC, AMRE, APU, ARCP, AVB, BAX, BMO, BOH, BX, CAT, CBRL, CLX, CM, COP, CPL, CSCO, CTL, CVS, CVX, D, DD, DLR, DRI, DUK, ED, FTR, GE, GG, GIS, GOOD, GOV, HAS, HCP, HE, IBM, INTC, JNJ, KMB, KMI, KMP, KO, KRFT, LAG, LLY, MCD, MKTX, MO, MSFT, NLY, NTIOF, O, OHI, PAYX, PEP, PG, REG, RY, SDRL, SDY, SE, SEP, SNH, SO, SPY, STAG, T, TGT, TUP, UN, UTX, VIG, VOD, VZ, WAG, WEC, WFC, WFM, WM, WMT, WU
Latest comments  |  Highest rated
  • Dividends Matter If They Matter To You [View article]
    <<Uncle Sam will have all your account drained to zero in the out years. >>

    Your same Uncle set up the rules that allowed you to accumulate wealth tax free. It is time to pay the piper.

    If you do not need the money, but it in a taxable investment account and keep investing it. Do not complain about finally paying taxes on money that you accumulated tax free for years and decades.
    Aug 15 01:06 AM | 35 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Should I Buy More High-Yielding Stocks In Order To Retire Early? [View article]
    Good article. I do own some REITs and higher-yielding utility stocks and SDRL.

    It all comes down to a company by company analysis - and you are very good at that. I do think that in a 35 position portfolio like I have, there is room for some higher yielding equities. As I have written before, I view such a portfolio as a symphony; together they make nice dividend and income increasing music. My overall current yield is about 3.8%, so I have not gone wild in the pursuit of yield. Some firms, like OHI, for example, have successfully combined higher yield with high dividend growth and excellent total returns.

    Buy and monitor, sell and replace remains the mantra, with a strong bias toward doing very little.
    May 22 09:39 AM | 24 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Diversifying The Perfect Retirement Portfolio - Here's How: Part 3 [View article]
    It does not amaze me :)
    May 5 05:23 PM | 19 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Unadulterated Truth About Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    <<Today's dividend growth investor is making use of Valuentum's Dividend Growth portfolio management tool. They are calculating when their investment will double on the basis of the rule of 72 via dividends paid to them. They're laser-focused on the Valuentum Dividend Cushion scores of their dividend growth firms to ensure growing cash flows will continue to come in.>>

    I am one of today's dividend growth investors and I have little knowledge of Valentum anything.
    Jan 16 08:27 AM | 18 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Intel's Dividend Disappointment: Don't Panic - Yet [View article]
    <<Now is not the time to panic about Intel's dividend; it's not a great sign that it wasn't raised right now, but with Q1 and Q2 playing out as they did, it is not yet the time. If the business had not been under severe pressure, then of course the dividend would have been raised by now. But these are uncertain times and Intel's likely "fate" will not be known until Q3/Q4 of this year.>>>

    All make an excellent case for selling INTC, which I did.

    That does not mean I will not buy it back later, but......
    Aug 4 07:22 AM | 17 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple: The Case Against A Dividend Increase [View article]
    Dividends matter. I want a good dividend increase and moderate buy backs going forward
    Apr 18 07:38 AM | 16 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple - Is It Losing The Battle Of The Ecosystems? [View article]
    No, Apple is not losing the ecosystem battle.

    Next question, please. Make it easy like this one was.
    Jan 16 08:56 AM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What's Your (Dividend Growth) Number? [View article]
    >>I think a lot of DGI success is dependent on innate skills, perhaps not even recognized by the possessors, that allow Mike, Robert, Chowder, etc., to be so great at DGI. There are a lot of very successful DGI'ers here, but in the investment world as a whole, doesn't seem like there are so many. I am skeptical of my own ability to duplicate such efforts long-term, and while I think I can, how much more effort will it take me than just accepting another somewhat lower alpha and higher risk strategy that has much lower personal effort needed?>>

    DGI does not require great skill. I am a testament to that. There is a map. We can all follow it. It is as simple as that.

    Chowder provides one of the most clear cut, easy to follow maps. Follow his success formula (the one in The Single Best Investment, basically) and you will achieve success. Not only is that formula in his profile, his holdings are in his profile.

    Bob Wells, David Van Knapp, Dave Crosetti, Mike Nadel and others flesh it out, some of them providing information on their holdings and on their stock selection process. There are real life examples provided by others.

    Between those, a subscription to Morningstar's Dividend Investor newsletter, and an upcoming subscription to F.A.S.T Graphs this method of investing becomes much simpler than it may seem.

    The wheel has been invented. No need to reinvent it. Follow the map and you can arrive at the destination. It is as simple as that. If you want a reliable, increasing income stream from financially strong companies, the path is well-lit.
    Nov 1 08:59 AM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Blue Chip Dividend Investing Without A Lid [View article]
    I think it is a bit silly to compare D with the other companies.

    They fulfill different roles in a multi-position portfolio - they are hired to do different jobs. D is a steady eddie with a 3 and 5 year dividend growth rate of 7%. My D position has a total return of 17% since I opened the position in late Feb. 2013.

    D has a current yield of 3.5%. BDX has a current yield of 1.9%.

    While they both can have a role in a diversified portfolio, these are two companies from different industries that make the comparison a bit stretched, in my opinion. I own D and while I do not own BDX, I do have lower yield, higher dividend growth positions in my portfolio, like WAG. I hire these companies for different reasons.

    A good portfolio is like a symphony - the various instruments play different roles. The income and total return music they produce, though, can be lovely and a work of art.
    Oct 27 08:52 AM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Models Update: Low Beta, High DGR Portfolio Off To A Great Start! [View article]
    I want you to know that I (and lots of other readers) appreciate the work that you do and share with us!
    Mar 29 08:56 PM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: The Absurdity Of Believing That Dividends Don't Matter In Retirement [View article]
    <<“People think that dividends are found money: they don’t realize it’s just money coming out of the company that could have been used to buy back shares or expand the business.”


    The crux as it relates to dividends is that the lure of dividends is behavioural. >>

    This is the most egregious type of nonsense. I know no one who believes that dividends are "found money". Dividends are the portion of a company's earnings that gets paid to the company's owners. It is behavioral in that it is part of a company's behavior to pay the owners, and it is the owner's behavior to receive their payment.

    "Lure of dividends?" It is a choice on how one wants to be paid. I choose, with 87% of our portfolios, to be paid on a regular basis through the mechanism of my business partners sending me part of our profits.

    It is no more complex than that.
    Aug 13 07:33 AM | 14 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Kinder Morgan: Mega Merger Enhances Dividend Growth Story [View article]
    It is not painful for me, as a KMI shareholder. If they in fact do give a 16% dividend increase, followed by 5 years of 10% dividend increases, I will be delighted!!

    The part of the total return that matters to me with KMI is the dividend and the growth of the dividend
    Aug 11 07:41 AM | 14 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Growth Investors - Mind Your Own Business [View article]
    <<Which is completely unrelated to the issue being discussed the subject is the never ending claims that reinvesting dividends is in effect a "free lunch".>>

    No, it is not unrelated to the issue being discussed, which is meeting one's investment goals.

    I do not know anyone who has claimed that dividends are a free lunch. They are income, income that is received without selling assets. It is a transfer of earnings to the owners of the corporation. We buy part of the company, we get part of the earnings. That is the deal.

    Some of us consider it a good deal.
    Aug 10 12:49 PM | 14 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Strategic Shift In My Dividend Portfolio [View article]
    <<In some ways, it took me way too long to make Coca-Cola one of three central stocks in my portfolio.>>

    I think folks need more than 3 central stocks in their portfolios. I also think utilities should make a core area of most dividend growth portfolios. I currently hold 6: AVA, D, LNT, NGG, WEC, SO. These represent about 10% of my total portfolio. I also hold 4 REITs: O, ARCP, DLR and OHI. These are about 8% of the total.

    I consider 5 of the six utilities are core holdings, and 2 of the 4 REITS.

    I also have a KO position. I think it is wiser to build a symphony as central holdings than a 3 piece jazz combo. My 34 holdings are listed at my profile.
    Dec 26 12:23 PM | 13 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Misguided Interest In Dividend Paying Stocks [View article]
    Selling shares of stock does not generate your own dividends. That is such a wrong-headed statement, it must be one of a fanatic ;)
    Dec 16 08:28 PM | 13 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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