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rnsmth

rnsmth
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  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    I am not the guy who wrote that they were gambling with my retirement. You did.

    I am not in a casino. I am an investor and am going quite well, thank you.

    I did not make anything up. Go back and read what you wrote. Maybe I misunderstood it, but I did not create anything out of thin air.

    Personally, I think people should stay out of casinos. I do.
    Aug 24, 2015. 09:37 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    <<However stocks and trading are not hobbies to me,they are essentially gambling with my family's retirement. I don't think I am unique at all in that regard. >>

    So you feel like you are gambling with your family's future. Please do not do that.

    Develop a sensible portfolio management plan, follow it and tweak it as needed. There is no need to gamble with something as important as your future.
    Aug 24, 2015. 08:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    That may be your only goal. Many of us are not betting on the stock market. You have a unique view, I would say.
    Aug 24, 2015. 06:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    Is politics really appropriate here?
    Aug 24, 2015. 06:42 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    It depends on your goals and your portfolio management rules. No such categorical statement can be true for everyone
    Aug 24, 2015. 06:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    << I can promise you someone who loses 75% of the portfolio they built up over 20 years and does so in six months will not be happy about it. furthermore, the environment that accompanies that decline will scare the hell out of many.>>

    Oh how they come out of the woodwork :)

    I am guessing not many people are going to see their dividend income decline by 75%, or their account balances.

    Of course, you are the Master, so your guess may be better than mine. HA!
    Aug 24, 2015. 03:58 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Dividend Growth Stocks For Your Retirement Portfolio's Aggregate Yield 4.3%: Part 2 [View article]
    <<Thinking that DGI is immune to external events, and that "value" based on past performance is the most important parameter is a very dangerous approach.>>

    I do not think it is immune to external events. What I do think is that a collection of financially strong companies that have a history to increasing their dividends are likely to continue to do so. A diversified portfolio of such companies is likely to work out well for those who are seeking a stable and increasing stream of income.

    Those who buy and monitor such companies, focusing on the safety of the dividend and the sustainability of dividend increases are likely to do all right, if a stable and increasing income stream is their goal.
    Aug 24, 2015. 10:23 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividends & Income Digest: MLPs Still Offer Appealing Opportunities, But They're Not For The Faint-Hearted [View article]
    <<If you pick SE or KMI or GLOP or EEP or CPLP and it starts tanking, then doubt enters: "did I pick the right one?" >>

    Nope.
    Aug 23, 2015. 08:39 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Dividend Growth Stocks For Your Retirement Portfolio's Aggregate Yield 4.3%: Part 2 [View article]
    <<"on the day of publication of the article">>

    What was the publication date?
    Aug 23, 2015. 08:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What Today's Market Collapse Proves And What You Should Do About It [View article]
    Sounds good to me. I might like reinvesting dividends at lower share prices for the next year.
    Aug 23, 2015. 06:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: When There Is Blood In The Streets, Will You Become A Vampire? [View article]
    I do not own WMT, but I do own TGT and am happy with it. I have never owned XOM, but did sell CVX at $90 a share cause I think the downturn in oil prices will be deeper and last long than some folks believe. I think that puts sustained and acceptable rates of dividend growth at risk, while realizing I may be wrong about that. We'll see.

    Oh, I have held PG and JNJ for about 3 years and am delighted that I do.
    Aug 23, 2015. 01:06 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 10 Dividend Growth Stocks For Your Retirement Portfolio's Aggregate Yield 4.3%: Part 2 [View article]
    <<Try, for example, to point out that if one had shorted the two stocks (TGT and UTX) mentioned in this author's article telling people not to buy bonds on the day of publication of the article, and one had simultaneously tripled down and bought the great grand daddy of bonds, TMF, the same day, he would have made quite a bit of of money. This simple empirical fact would never matter to most people who subscribe to the methodology propounded by the author and certainly not to the author himself. >>

    Bought them when? Held them for how long?

    This simple lack of empirical facts makes your comment less than useful.
    Aug 23, 2015. 12:56 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In Today's Overheated Market, Control Risk In Your Retirement Portfolios With Sound Valuation [View article]
    <<I am VERY rich. Damn lucky, too.>>

    Well, yeah :)
    Aug 23, 2015. 12:51 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In Today's Overheated Market, Control Risk In Your Retirement Portfolios With Sound Valuation [View article]
    <<The starting point for rich is $100 million. (1 in 10,000 tax filers)>>

    I dunno, I think it is a far more subjective thing.

    I do not have 100 million. I do have retirement income that would take close to a couple of million at 3% to replace. That is not counting the dividend income that we have.

    I just took some friends to the bus station this morning so they could get to Cancun to fly home to Indiana. They were here for a few days. The four of us had a wonderful dinner on a lovely square (steaks, a wild pig leg and duck breast with Mole sauce, margaritas all around before dinner with wine or beer with dinner). That cost $108 US plus tip. We had a great visit showing them Merida and the area.

    So, while not rich by your definition (or maybe anyone else's), we are living well. I think that is what counts. there is a lot to be said for living well.
    Aug 23, 2015. 12:51 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Selling Apple To Avoid Stagnation And Boost Income [View article]
    << With their huge resources, they should have brought out low, mid and high end models to cater to all the market. >>

    That would have been a major mistake, and to what end. Apple is already vacuuming in close to 90% of global cell phone profits.

    I have a difficult time understanding why anyone would suggest that Apple go into a very low margin, money-losing business. They have never done that and it is one reason why their gross margins stay around 40% - not the only reason, but a major reason
    Aug 23, 2015. 07:11 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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