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Neil459

Neil459
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  • FOMC Announcement: The economy has returned to moderate growth, says the committee, even as fiscal policy has become more restrictive. The asset purchase program remains in place. Chairman Bernanke's press conference begins at 2:30 ET. [View news story]
    How many times as this "The economy has returned to moderate growth" been stated by the propaganda news outlets and FOMC. I guess they believe that if you say it enough it will become true.
    Mar 20 02:52 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Bernanke press conference: "The lack of thresholds come from the complexity of the problem," he says, responding to a question about why the FOMC isn't issuing guidance about what economic indicators it wants to see before altering QE. The Fed is looking for "sustained improvement" in a range of data. [View news story]
    Let me convert this from Washington Speak to English, "We don't have the foggiest idea what is going on and we don't want to be held to any standard of action or commitment to action (in case the political winds change)."
    Mar 20 02:48 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Chairman Bernanke's press conference is underway: Curiously talking about gasoline early in his opening statement, Bernanke says the Fed believes temporary refinery repair shutdowns have much to do with prices hovering near $4 per gallon. [View news story]
    Of course, Obama stating he wanted $5 per gallon means nothing.

    Of course, Obama blocking pipelines means nothing.

    Of course, Obama blocking drilling offshore means nothing.

    Of course, Obama blocking new refineries means nothing.

    Of course, Obama mandating that refineries add new additives to all gasoline means nothing.
    Mar 20 02:41 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Washington Post (WPO -0.6%) plans to charge frequent users of its website a monthly fee to view content. The move follows in the footsteps of heavyweight publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, and New York Times which have been successful with the paywall model to a degree. [View news story]
    Sittingcrow, not usually. But you might have something in this case. After I wrote it, it seemed to me that one might think I was talking about the readers when in fact I was talking about the publisher since most people will not pay for the propaganda that passes as news these days.
    Mar 19 05:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Market recap: Little Cyprus was big news on Wall Street, as investors weighed whether the country's plan to impose a tax on bank deposits to finance a eurozone bailout would lead to broader European problems. Most key sectors closed negative, led by financials and energy. The euro plunged to a three-month low vs. the dollar; gold closed above $1,600 for the first time this month. [View news story]
    Leftbanker, Yep, after the uproar, everyone started changing their tune. But the fact is that Teresa Ghilarducci, director of economic policy analysis at the New School for Social Research does in fact advocate the government deciding that they can better manage IRAs and did suggest it to MIller Committee in October 2008.

    The other fact is that IRA's amount to about $20 trillion that the government cannot get it's hands on yet. Make no mistake about it, Obama would take all of it in a heartbeat if he thought he would get away with it.

    What stopped it was the outrage, not ideology. See you have to read between the lines. Just like Obama care was touted as voluntary, we all now know it will not be.

    If you think it can't happen here, you are sadly wrong. For example, did you know there is now a 3.8% federal tax on selling your home thanks to Obamacare's no tax on the middle class.
    Mar 19 05:19 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A panel of 118 professional forecasters is predicting average annual home price increases of 4.1% annually for the next 5 years, according to a Zillow survey. Sounds modest? In the 12 years preceding the housing bubble (1987-1999), home prices averaged a 3.6% annual increase. Even the most pessimistic quartile of the group sees an annual average increase of about 2%. [View news story]
    "Processional" Hmmmm, what does that mean in today's market?
    Mar 18 07:37 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Washington Post (WPO -0.6%) plans to charge frequent users of its website a monthly fee to view content. The move follows in the footsteps of heavyweight publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, and New York Times which have been successful with the paywall model to a degree. [View news story]
    Excellent. That should provide a good way to punish commie, socialists idealists (the ones that expect everything for free.)
    Mar 18 07:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Market recap: Little Cyprus was big news on Wall Street, as investors weighed whether the country's plan to impose a tax on bank deposits to finance a eurozone bailout would lead to broader European problems. Most key sectors closed negative, led by financials and energy. The euro plunged to a three-month low vs. the dollar; gold closed above $1,600 for the first time this month. [View news story]
    What is all this Cyprus stuff about, no one cared at all when Democrats considered plans to absorb 401k's, you know to help the children from greedy parents that didn't know how to manage money.
    Mar 18 07:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Verizon (VZ) has joined Cablevision in wanting a shakeup of the pay-TV industry's structure: Big Red says it's talking with several "midtier and smaller" TV network owners about paying for channels based on how many subscribers watch, rather than the number of covered homes. Verizon's efforts, which it says would allow it to offer a bigger lineup of niche channels, aren't as dramatic as Cablevision's attempts to end to channel bundling. But they still underscore industry discontent with having to pay per-user fees for less popular channels from media giants such as Viacom (VIA) and Disney (DIS), regardless of viewing activity. [View news story]
    Of course the bill will not go down, but maybe the quality will go up because we will not be forced to pay for the crap that gets shoved down our throats with bundling. That's why capitalism works and it also why a lot of people don't want capitalism.
    Mar 18 10:51 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • UBS highlights eight stocks it thinks will benefit from U.S. infrastructure spending, particularly in long-term areas such as pipelines and chemicals as well as isolated projects such as rebuilding from Superstorm Sandy: ACM, FLR, FWLT, JEC, PWR, TPC, URS, WG[View news story]
    "Actually earnings are fine" as long as they keep firing people. The smoke and mirrors can only go on so long.
    Mar 13 05:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Goldman Sachs (GS) will hold its annual meeting in Salt Lake City,  the first time it's ever been outside of the NYC area. Lured by low taxes, and a cheaper, but well-educated workforce, Goldman is fast building out operations in Utah as it cuts back elsewhere. [View news story]
    This is the same GS that was propped up by the government, single handedly enabled one the greatest bubbles in US history, and who's analysts are all strident big government types and supporters of the big government version of socialism. Is there a key central bank senior officer who is not a GS alumni? What heresy is this?

    And Obama told us they would be happy to pay more taxes. Say it ain't so.
    Mar 13 05:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • UBS highlights eight stocks it thinks will benefit from U.S. infrastructure spending, particularly in long-term areas such as pipelines and chemicals as well as isolated projects such as rebuilding from Superstorm Sandy: ACM, FLR, FWLT, JEC, PWR, TPC, URS, WG[View news story]
    We have prices going up and earnings going down and no end in sight, just where is the private money going to come from?
    Mar 13 04:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • UBS highlights eight stocks it thinks will benefit from U.S. infrastructure spending, particularly in long-term areas such as pipelines and chemicals as well as isolated projects such as rebuilding from Superstorm Sandy: ACM, FLR, FWLT, JEC, PWR, TPC, URS, WG[View news story]
    Infrastructure does not vote, when it comes to spending cut backs the money will go to buy votes. Read that to mean food stamps, social security, obamacare, unemployment, etc. There won't be any left for infrastructure. This is not a long term play at all.
    Mar 13 12:48 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The CBOE Volatility Index today dropped below 12 for the first time since 2007 and against a long-term average of 20.4. Contrary to what contrarians believe, writes Mark Hulbert, low VIX levels are not necessarily bearish. Thinking about VIX as what it is - a measure of expected volatility - rather than as a "fear gauge" might help do away with this misperception. VXX -2.2%[View news story]
    . . . . that is nothing can go wrong if you are a central banker.
    Mar 11 01:19 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In the two decades through December, the average return of all investors in U.S. stock mutual funds was an annualized 4.25% vs 8.2% for the S&P 500. That translates into a difference of $25,467 for an investment of $10,000. "The dismal truth is that over the long run, the average person is a woeful investor," writes the NYT's Jeff Sommer. [View news story]
    Wait a minute ! I need all those losing mutual fund managers so I can make my money. Let's not kill the golden goose here.
    Mar 10 10:52 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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