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D_Virginia

D_Virginia
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  • Warren Buffett isn’t the only rich guy who wants higher taxes on the rich. A new survey finds 68% of millionaires support raising taxes on those with $1M or more in income. The result surprises Spectrem Group's George Walper: "I thought that among this group there would be a feeling of 'why doesn’t he keep his nose out of it'... The reality is maybe it has to be done."  [View news story]
    Tony, help us all out here, what poll was that? Because we all know you wouldn't make up random sarcastic nonsense.

    You can find a list of recent AP polls here:
    http://surveys.ap.org/

    Thanks!
    Oct 27, 2011. 12:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett isn’t the only rich guy who wants higher taxes on the rich. A new survey finds 68% of millionaires support raising taxes on those with $1M or more in income. The result surprises Spectrem Group's George Walper: "I thought that among this group there would be a feeling of 'why doesn’t he keep his nose out of it'... The reality is maybe it has to be done."  [View news story]
    Max, I think he was referring to what I would call the buy-a-mob that is News Corp.

    And he's right. There's as much disparity among "the 1%" as there is among the 100%. The millions of millionaires don't have nearly the money or influence (but those are the same thing) that the thousand or so billionaires do.
    Oct 27, 2011. 12:30 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett isn’t the only rich guy who wants higher taxes on the rich. A new survey finds 68% of millionaires support raising taxes on those with $1M or more in income. The result surprises Spectrem Group's George Walper: "I thought that among this group there would be a feeling of 'why doesn’t he keep his nose out of it'... The reality is maybe it has to be done."  [View news story]
    While I fully support Warren's notion, this is a very problematic survey.

    The survey pool was people with more than $1M net worth (and separately, people with more than $5M net worth), not necessarily people with more than $1M/year *incomes*.

    So this is really the upper middle class saying that the rich should pay more, as opposed to the rich saying that the rich should pay more.

    Still, fight the good fight. :)
    Oct 27, 2011. 11:55 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In a sign on how much the Mac is being embraced as a business tool, leading industry research firm Forrester is now urging IT departments to support Apple's (AAPL) PCs, given widespread employee interest in using them. Nonetheless, 41% of enterprises still block all access to company resources to Mac users.  [View news story]
    Let's see, if you ran a large IT department for a large company, why might you not want to support Macs very well?

    - It's just one more platform to configure and support
    - No hardware vendor competition = higher prices
    - Very little hardware upgrade options
    - Almost no custom hardware options
    - Some software simply isn't available for Macs
    - Much software is usually available for PCs first, and Macs later
    - Software patches are usually available for PCs first, Macs later
    - Any custom software you've made is probably for PCs
    - As Macs gain in popularity, especially in businesses, so will the popularity of trojans and other malware for Macs

    Don't get me wrong, it will shift over time, especially given the current and future focus on web applications. And more power to them (Apple, that is).

    But when you have a business to run, it's not remotely as simple as "employees want to use them".
    Oct 27, 2011. 08:28 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Simon Johnson approves President Obama's nomination of Thomas Hoenig for FDIC vice chairman, saying he has been a "strong voice for financial sector reform along sensible lines." Most importantly, Johnson argues, Hoenig has the clout with politicians and big banks to get meaningful policy changes pushed through.  [View news story]
    Hey look, it's President Obama is giving conservatives exactly what they (and what I) want!

    Oh well, they'll just spit in his face and reject it, just because it came from him.

    How long before they start questioning Heonig's birth certificate?
    Oct 27, 2011. 08:18 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The White House reveals details of its student loan relief plan a day ahead of Pres. Obama's announcement. Monthly payments for some students will be reduced to 10% of discretionary income, debt balances will be forgiven after 20 years of payments, and some students can consolidate their loans with government loans into a single payment with a reduced interest rate.  [View news story]
    > because most of them have technical backgrounds anyways.

    Which would make them engineers that got turned into business people. :)
    Oct 25, 2011. 10:37 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Paul Farrell pens his most apocalyptic vision yet of U.S. and global decline, as denial and greedy addictions render us unable to deal with the biggest bubble ever: an exploding population that could hit 10B by 2050. "Already too many people in our world. Adding too many more every day. Not enough resources." Among his solutions: "Rapid and wholly voluntary reductions of fertility."  [View news story]
    Markets are trading in a range, they might break any time now, but it all depends what happens with the Klingons.

    And don't forget to hedge for Trouble with Tribbles!!!
    Oct 25, 2011. 10:36 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The White House reveals details of its student loan relief plan a day ahead of Pres. Obama's announcement. Monthly payments for some students will be reduced to 10% of discretionary income, debt balances will be forgiven after 20 years of payments, and some students can consolidate their loans with government loans into a single payment with a reduced interest rate.  [View news story]
    > Unless all the people with business degrees start new
    > businesses. That would be worthwhile as they would turn
    > around and hire more engineers and other employees.

    Uh...hire /what/ engineers? Where? China? Germany? Sweden?

    The whole problem is that the U.S. currently doesn't have enough skilled workers (or knowledge workers, call them what you will), so we need to start creating them, incentivizing people to go get educated/trained.

    There's a reason so many foreign nationals come to the U.S. to go to college, we KNOW how to make great, productive workers in this country, we just need to break the cultural bias against real work (and create a cultural bias against things like reality TV), and then help people scale the tuition wall.

    The mass MBA-ization of America is part of the problem, not part of the solution. We have thrown more than enough business, marketing, and finance at the economy over the last few decades and look where it has gotten us. Trust me, if you crank out engineers all over the place, there will still be more than enough deal-wheelers and paper-pushers itching to make money by putting them to work.

    You can turn an engineer into a businessman, but you can't turn a businessman into an engineer.

    It's time to get back to basics.
    Oct 25, 2011. 10:20 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • There are three things government can do right now to spur our ailing economy, Jamie Dimon says. First, fix the antiquated tax code, because businesses are paralyzed by confusing tax policies and pending regulation. Second, stop demonizing business, it's our economic engine. The third and most important step, Dimon adds, is that we need to devise an all-new “Marshall Plan."  [View news story]
    I actually agree with Dimon about taxes -- but I don't remotely trust the likes of him to come up with the overhaul plan.

    As for "adversarial climate against businesses", I have an alternate theory there: the government has been, in light of the crisis, sickeningly accommodating of large corporations these past few years, especially the Wall Street banks. Other than some antagonistic rhetoric (which never goes beyond words), big business really doesn't have much to complain about, but they know that if they keep complaining, the government will accommodate them more and more, to try to dodge the anti-growth stigma.

    It's a good gig if you can get it.

    You know how it is -- if you keep stuffing money in the front end of the beast...
    http://bit.ly/ujt992
    Oct 25, 2011. 10:05 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The White House reveals details of its student loan relief plan a day ahead of Pres. Obama's announcement. Monthly payments for some students will be reduced to 10% of discretionary income, debt balances will be forgiven after 20 years of payments, and some students can consolidate their loans with government loans into a single payment with a reduced interest rate.  [View news story]
    I'm with you on the multiple degrees, and on the notion that business adds value.

    But it's a numbers game, to some extent.

    While I don't think it's practical to "manage" the numbers of which kinds of degrees are obtained, there are some pragmatic ratios that are noteworthy.

    Specifically, you can do a lot (as a corporation, or a nation) with a few business people and a lot of engineers -- but you can only do so much with a few engineers and a lot of business people.

    Remember the old joke about Japanese rowers -- there's some truth there:
    http://bit.ly/tZZESj/
    Oct 25, 2011. 09:35 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Paul Farrell pens his most apocalyptic vision yet of U.S. and global decline, as denial and greedy addictions render us unable to deal with the biggest bubble ever: an exploding population that could hit 10B by 2050. "Already too many people in our world. Adding too many more every day. Not enough resources." Among his solutions: "Rapid and wholly voluntary reductions of fertility."  [View news story]
    I do have all the answers. About Star Trek. :)
    Oct 25, 2011. 08:31 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • There are three things government can do right now to spur our ailing economy, Jamie Dimon says. First, fix the antiquated tax code, because businesses are paralyzed by confusing tax policies and pending regulation. Second, stop demonizing business, it's our economic engine. The third and most important step, Dimon adds, is that we need to devise an all-new “Marshall Plan."  [View news story]
    Incorrect, Moose.

    The article sheds no more light on Dimon's actual proposals than the summary here does. Therefore, we have to assume it's "the usual" from Jamie Dimon: he's the victim being unfairly punished by the evil regulations designed to stop him and his ilk from destroying the global economy twice in one decade.

    Just calling it like it is...

    If he wants to expand on his plan to "fix the antiquated tax code", I'd be happy to hear his approach, but I bet you a thumbs-up that it involves more taxes on the poor and less taxes on the rich and even less (effective!) taxes on corporations.

    If it's anything that is actually "a solution that helps everyone in the U.S.", I will be truly, truly shocked.
    Oct 25, 2011. 08:28 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • There are three things government can do right now to spur our ailing economy, Jamie Dimon says. First, fix the antiquated tax code, because businesses are paralyzed by confusing tax policies and pending regulation. Second, stop demonizing business, it's our economic engine. The third and most important step, Dimon adds, is that we need to devise an all-new “Marshall Plan."  [View news story]
    So, to summarize:
    1) Don't tax banks.
    2) Don't call banks on their bullsh*t.
    3) Give more money to banks.
    Oct 25, 2011. 08:08 PM | 14 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The White House reveals details of its student loan relief plan a day ahead of Pres. Obama's announcement. Monthly payments for some students will be reduced to 10% of discretionary income, debt balances will be forgiven after 20 years of payments, and some students can consolidate their loans with government loans into a single payment with a reduced interest rate.  [View news story]
    Depending on your income, your payments may not have been reduced, and your debt may have been paid off in 20 years anyway.

    Many folks' situations are different from yours. Some people really are in tough spots through little fault of their own (and some dug their own holes and should have known better).

    Don't jump to conclusions, wait to see the real effects of any plan.

    DO get all the facts, and by all means, hold politicians accountable based on those facts.

    Regardless, kudos to you for getting an employable degree at an affordable college and paying down your debt early. I wish most of the kids I know had even half that much financial sense. Keep it up!
    Oct 25, 2011. 07:02 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Paul Farrell pens his most apocalyptic vision yet of U.S. and global decline, as denial and greedy addictions render us unable to deal with the biggest bubble ever: an exploding population that could hit 10B by 2050. "Already too many people in our world. Adding too many more every day. Not enough resources." Among his solutions: "Rapid and wholly voluntary reductions of fertility."  [View news story]
    As a techie I must correct you about the possibilities you shoot down so flippantly.

    As everyone educated in the sciences knows, the Star Trek universe had nothing like limited population growth. Captain Kirk alone probably had dozens of children with dozens of women. And don't count out Commander Riker, either, you know he got himself some.

    See, it's not that they limited population growth, it's that they grew the supply of inhabitable planets.

    So, in conclusion, this proves that supply side economics is obviously the stuff of science fiction television. :)
    Oct 25, 2011. 06:55 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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