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  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    That is a sensible and cynical attitude. You are thinking right.
    May 3, 2011. 12:22 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    Because he is just a figurehead. Do you actually think he had did anything to get the job done?
    May 3, 2011. 12:21 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    That is BS Geoffster,

    And you should no better than making left/right generalizations. You are a libertarion for christs sake. I have been a democrat and and a now a libertarian and I would not volunteer for that mission. But does that mean no democrat would? Come on?
    May 3, 2011. 12:16 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    Well said,
    However the "next threat" to the US is our government and their policies. Our policies and their disregard for other cultures and their needs is our problem. We reap what we sow.

    Sure there are evil people and extremists but they have their reasons.

    Pull out of the middle east, stop manipulating their governments and we will see the problems with the extremists end.

    Remember Saddam was "our boy" for a long time.
    May 3, 2011. 12:03 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    We can equate you with Machiavelli999. Two idiots, one from the left and one from the right. Put the two of you together and it is one hell of a "square" dance. We need to walk you guys thru the middle aisle and crucify you extremist yokols because you fight against the sensible middle ground with your left/right horseshit. If you think for a minute that your Dem/Rep parties are any different then think again. You generalizing simpletons are the biggest problem we have. Left or right. Go away and MAYBE we can get to the crux of all our problems.
    May 2, 2011. 11:49 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    Your quote Mchiavelli999,

    Dec 8 2009

    "What will people say when we are gaining 100k+ jobs every month this time next year about Obama's policies?"

    And now you say. "So, now you can make your investment choices with that "certainty" in mind."

    And you say?

    And I say, You don't have a leg to stand on. Shut the f... up.
    May 2, 2011. 11:35 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With bin Laden dead, what's next? What's changed? Short-term, the U.S. must brace for the possibility of retaliation, and oil markets could see increased volatility. Long-term, the U.S. must decide whether to "press the advantage" in the Mideast or begin to pull back. For Obama, the political glow could last until Nov. 2012, but much can happen in 18 months.  [View news story]
    If only it was that simple. When and if "playing the game along side the US" payed the bills and built a future for the people of the middle east then the terrorists might think again. That does not seem to be happening.

    It is appearing that our "allies" in the middle east are not as secure as we thought and for good reason. Real friends are hard to come by, as we say. We have to earn respect and our policies have a lot of respect to earn.

    Having said that, we have to keep the hard line but earn respect by keeping our noses out of their business and playing for keeps with their future welfare in ours and their best interests.

    Other wise we are back to square one with terrorism being the status quo.
    May 2, 2011. 11:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Grownups have gone quiet on both sides of the political aisle, Kash Mansori writes, as a growing number of Democrats join Republicans in threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. "The dangerous game in which the possibility of U.S. government default is a bargaining chip does not seem to be over, and in fact seems to be getting new players."  [View news story]
    Every one should read Machiavelli's last stock talk on SA. In dec. 2009. Mouse over his name and this is what you see.

    "What will people say when we are gaining 100k+ jobs every month this time next year about Obama's policies?"
    Dec 08, 2009

    Now is this guy a fool or what?
    Apr 30, 2011. 01:55 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Grownups have gone quiet on both sides of the political aisle, Kash Mansori writes, as a growing number of Democrats join Republicans in threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. "The dangerous game in which the possibility of U.S. government default is a bargaining chip does not seem to be over, and in fact seems to be getting new players."  [View news story]
    Well said David. It is clear from the thumb up/down ratio that about half the people are mad/crazy.
    Apr 30, 2011. 11:01 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The biggest brawl in D.C. isn't the budget battle; it's the proposed regulations over debit card fees. HuffPo's Zach Carter's description of the slugfest between the banking and retail industries mostly exposes how "Washington doesn't work." For Yves Smith, the "ugly spectacle... is compelling proof of the need to regulate financial services firms as utilities."  [View news story]
    Enigmaman,

    Your clarity of thought has made my day. And you said it perfectly: "DC wants to send a message". No distracting left/ right distinction on your part.
    Apr 28, 2011. 11:43 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The biggest brawl in D.C. isn't the budget battle; it's the proposed regulations over debit card fees. HuffPo's Zach Carter's description of the slugfest between the banking and retail industries mostly exposes how "Washington doesn't work." For Yves Smith, the "ugly spectacle... is compelling proof of the need to regulate financial services firms as utilities."  [View news story]
    Glad you agree, but do you actually believe that "DEMS" are alone in their interest of bigger government. When one thinks there are great divisions between the agendas and philosophies of our 2 political parties that person should think again. That is just a distraction to keep voting Dems and Reps fighting against each other instead of uniting and taking down ALL the crooks and fools in DC. All the crooks and fools on both sides of the isle that want bigger government.

    And as important as economics is ( I studied it in high school as well as university. ) other things like morality, respect for each other and the environment that provides our living are just as important. Those three concepts can provide the basis for educated consumers who can support highly competitive companies that look out for everybody's long term interests.
    Apr 28, 2011. 11:34 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The biggest brawl in D.C. isn't the budget battle; it's the proposed regulations over debit card fees. HuffPo's Zach Carter's description of the slugfest between the banking and retail industries mostly exposes how "Washington doesn't work." For Yves Smith, the "ugly spectacle... is compelling proof of the need to regulate financial services firms as utilities."  [View news story]
    Tack is right on the money here.

    More often than not I agree with Yves Smith, and what she says sounds good at first listen but it will not work with financials just as it does not work with utilities. What makes Yves think utility regulation works so well? No back up for that statement in the article. And regulation does not work NOW with financials. Financial services are already regulated and all the big thinkers (sarcasm) in WDC have been sitting on their asses for years constantly coming up with new ideas to regulate further and better(sarcasm). It did not stop this last mess and I don't give a damn how hard they try but our government (and more importantly the people running it) won't stop the next mess. Oh, and to clarify when I say "people running it" I do not just mean this administration.

    The only way I can see for us to get control of financials or any other industry is to make governments role education of the masses so that free markets can work efficiently and not to the detriment of the masses. Regulation sounds great but in general it does not work and it costs way more than it benefits.

    In a perfect world with perfect humans I am all for it, but we are not even close to perfect.
    Apr 28, 2011. 10:54 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Americans of a certain age may remember their parents returning from trips to Mexico with bags full of goods and tales of the low prices to be had. Canadians of 2011 feel the same way about the U.S., where the falling greenback has put a 20% off sale on items purchased in the States, according to BMO.  [View news story]
    Believe it. The Mexicans would be coming for bargains if we would let them in.
    Apr 25, 2011. 11:45 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • "We no longer have free market capitalism and we no longer have a democracy," David Stockman says, replaced by a system of "crony capitalism" that benefits and even rigs the system in favor of banks. "The Fed is the great enabler" through its free money policies, which "generate results the market wouldn't otherwise provide for," he says.  [View news story]
    Truth, justice and the OLD American way. Throw the cronies in the poky. Be sure to include Econdoc!
    Apr 25, 2011. 11:42 AM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Americans of a certain age may remember their parents returning from trips to Mexico with bags full of goods and tales of the low prices to be had. Canadians of 2011 feel the same way about the U.S., where the falling greenback has put a 20% off sale on items purchased in the States, according to BMO.  [View news story]
    I just got back from a trip to Chile. I quickly realized I would have got more for my dollar in NYC, LA or at a professional sports stadium where hot dogs are $8. Thanks Bernanke and co.!
    Apr 25, 2011. 11:13 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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