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  • We essentially have two Europes, muses Art Cashin, Greece and Portugal et al., and then all the rest. Eventually, they're going to need to find a way to separate, Cashin says, and Greece may wind up being the first "gangrenous finger" to be cut off. (video)   [View news story]
    BA

    Your words are very similair to language I heard in 2008.

    And why would Greece agree to debt writedown to 100% of GDP? Why not tell everyone to bugger off completely? If you are going to default one might as well clean the slate.
    Jan 27, 2012. 02:11 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Mitt Romney was just following the tax laws when he paid a rate of 13.9% on income of more than $21M in 2010, Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein tells a Davos forum on the future of capitalism. But if elected, the presidential candidate reportedly might consider ending the carried interest tax break which allows PE executives like himself to pay such a low tax rate.   [View news story]
    If the 99% made all the wealth they would have it because obviously they always owned it.
    Jan 27, 2012. 02:05 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mitt Romney was just following the tax laws when he paid a rate of 13.9% on income of more than $21M in 2010, Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein tells a Davos forum on the future of capitalism. But if elected, the presidential candidate reportedly might consider ending the carried interest tax break which allows PE executives like himself to pay such a low tax rate.   [View news story]
    Before you lick his boots because of his self serving comments you might want to look at what he does versus what he says. He makes long term investments he rarely sells so he can avoid taxes and he donates his wealth to charity rather than give it to the government he seems to believe should be getting it. And the charity he donates to spreads money all over the world with little in the US where he made his fortune.

    I don't mind him advocating any position but he definitely has not practiced what he is preaching. Reminds me of the last Godfather movie when the Godfather starts donating money to the Church to get himself right with God and shine up his legacy. The money he was donating was from criminal activity. It is hard to clean up your act when your hands are dirty.
    Jan 27, 2012. 02:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mitt Romney was just following the tax laws when he paid a rate of 13.9% on income of more than $21M in 2010, Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein tells a Davos forum on the future of capitalism. But if elected, the presidential candidate reportedly might consider ending the carried interest tax break which allows PE executives like himself to pay such a low tax rate.   [View news story]
    WB developed a concious with one foot in the grave. Where was it over the past 50 years?

    Putting that aside why don't we all pay 15% and just cut government down to size?
    Jan 25, 2012. 10:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Mitt Romney was just following the tax laws when he paid a rate of 13.9% on income of more than $21M in 2010, Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein tells a Davos forum on the future of capitalism. But if elected, the presidential candidate reportedly might consider ending the carried interest tax break which allows PE executives like himself to pay such a low tax rate.   [View news story]
    Why don't we all just pay 20% of income as tax, get rid of all the deductions and cut government spending down to 20% or less. End of story.
    Jan 25, 2012. 05:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • It's becoming increasingly apparent that Greece is going to default on its March 20 debt payment. Although a default would be disruptive, the consensus seems to be that now would be the time to get it out of the way. Market behavior is demonstrating a sense of fatalism to the event, and that its impact may not have the same catastrophic effect on U.S. markets as it would have six months ago.   [View news story]
    What is so valuable about gold? Only that we believe it is valuable. Kind of similair to a dollar isn't it?

    Gold is not very portable either so when you look at the characteristics of a transaction medium gold starts to fall apart.
    Jan 21, 2012. 02:14 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It's becoming increasingly apparent that Greece is going to default on its March 20 debt payment. Although a default would be disruptive, the consensus seems to be that now would be the time to get it out of the way. Market behavior is demonstrating a sense of fatalism to the event, and that its impact may not have the same catastrophic effect on U.S. markets as it would have six months ago.   [View news story]
    bear

    How is the gold standard immovable? I find a new supply of gold and it doubles the currency. Everyone runs around and looks for gold in streams from now on and invades the Black Hills?
    Jan 20, 2012. 02:58 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It's becoming increasingly apparent that Greece is going to default on its March 20 debt payment. Although a default would be disruptive, the consensus seems to be that now would be the time to get it out of the way. Market behavior is demonstrating a sense of fatalism to the event, and that its impact may not have the same catastrophic effect on U.S. markets as it would have six months ago.   [View news story]
    These precious metals currency dreams are not the solution. Prudent fiscal policies are the solution.
    Jan 20, 2012. 12:06 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • In "a largely symbolic vote aimed at staking out election-year positions on government spending," the House rejects 239-176 - not enough to avoid Pres. Obama's veto - the $1.3T increase in the federal debt limit. Ron Paul, as always, votes against the debt hike but calls the vote a “farce” because lawmakers already gave Obama the power to lift the cap.   [View news story]
    It strikes me that we have already invested heavily in education and millions of Asians confirm that each year by coming to the US for an education. Motivation not money is the real issue. We are fat and lazy.
    Jan 20, 2012. 12:04 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why it's time to break up the big banks, according to Sheila Bair: Customers would benefit, the government would benefit, the banks themselves would be stronger. It would be in shareholder's best interest too, she says; P/Es and price-to-book for the supersizers far underperforms the bigger regional banks - they'd likely be worth plenty more in easier-to-understand pieces.   [View news story]
    Sheila is right but as long as government is centralizing power and becoming large then business will do the same so they can manage their environment and compete.These are two peas in a pod that both need downsizing.
    Jan 20, 2012. 12:01 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • This just in: Researchers at the St. Louis Fed argue the CBO consistently underestimates government borrowing needs, suggesting already potentially ugly deficits in the out years will come in even worse. The research asserts if anything, CBO projections are worse now than they've been in the past.   [View news story]
    That would take us to around $20 Trillion provided interest rates stay low. Worse case scenario is that deficits pile up and then interest rates spike. An economic dagger to the heart.

    We are on acid and playing with fire.
    Jan 19, 2012. 12:44 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In "a largely symbolic vote aimed at staking out election-year positions on government spending," the House rejects 239-176 - not enough to avoid Pres. Obama's veto - the $1.3T increase in the federal debt limit. Ron Paul, as always, votes against the debt hike but calls the vote a “farce” because lawmakers already gave Obama the power to lift the cap.   [View news story]
    anon

    Investment typically comes from capital stock not incessant deficit spending. If our debt was not so high we could get away with more but our options are diminishing rapidly.

    And if we are investing in American what is the measurable return?
    Jan 19, 2012. 12:41 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It's becoming increasingly apparent that Greece is going to default on its March 20 debt payment. Although a default would be disruptive, the consensus seems to be that now would be the time to get it out of the way. Market behavior is demonstrating a sense of fatalism to the event, and that its impact may not have the same catastrophic effect on U.S. markets as it would have six months ago.   [View news story]
    There must be something about the human condition that makes us want to live in denial. Maybe that is why people don't like the math of deficits it is just too stark and unforgiving. Kind of reminds me of a book I read Predictably Irrational.

    Anyways lets just tee up the rest of the western world that is overleveraged and the special interest groups screaming for another check and get ready for another "increasingly apparent" epiphany.
    Jan 19, 2012. 12:39 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Capitalism today may not be all we want it to be, but it's also not as bad as the critics would have you believe, says Larry Summers. While we may be stuck in a "cyclically, substantially depressed" economy right now, our system, warts and all, still beats the alternatives. (video)   [View news story]
    Not saying I like it but you know how they think.
    Jan 18, 2012. 11:25 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Capitalism today may not be all we want it to be, but it's also not as bad as the critics would have you believe, says Larry Summers. While we may be stuck in a "cyclically, substantially depressed" economy right now, our system, warts and all, still beats the alternatives. (video)   [View news story]
    Bob

    I know this space well. So in the zoo Apple is the gorilla and the rest of them are meerkats looking around. And the services that go with the platform like music and video are only delivered by Apple with any credibility.

    This game is over unless the government steps in and states they need to break apart iTunes from the devices because all the other device makers should hang it up outside of Google's Android phones.

    The only debate is whether or not Apple is too expensive for the earnings but their market dominance is incredible. Google is a player but is playing a different game.
    Jan 17, 2012. 11:25 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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