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OptionManiac

OptionManiac
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  • When Does the Unusual Become the Usual? [View article]
    Great comments. Most likely, we can not foresee the next driving force. Funny how new fangled products (like the car) are pooh poohed and than end up being the driving force behind an economy. I'm glad you see that we are in a cycle and not a whirlpool. Hear too much of that around here.
    Jul 22 01:09 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Even if third-quarter growth lags the first half, the double-dip risk is "slight," NY Fed's William Dudley says in a regional update. Nationally, manufacturing has been a key growth source in the recovery, behind an unusually pronounced inventory cycle.  [View news story]
    Nobody knows what's going to happen, good or bad. Enjoying the weather here today, cincinnatijake? Just wait til tomorrow.
    Jul 22 11:10 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Exxon Mobil (XOM), Chevron (CVX), Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) and Conoco Phillips (COP) are expected to announce that they will form a joint venture to design, build and operate a rapid-response system to capture and contain catastrophic deepwater spills, in a bid to regain public confidence in the oil industry.  [View news story]
    Totally agree. Should have been done years ago. Wouldn't it be nice if we entered an age of responsible industry? No need for government oversight.
    Jul 21 08:52 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Most of the developed world is pretty much in line when it comes to income distribution, but not the U.S., Brett Arends asserts, where the results are more in line with Zimbabwe, Argentina and El Salvador. The average Fortune 500 CEO pockets $10.5M a year, more than 300 times the average worker's pay.  [View news story]
    I totally agree. If you want me to buy a share (stake) of your company, then give me a voice, however small. This is a bit of a socialist/capitilist melding. The little guy has an actual stake in industry, but only if he wants to.
    Jul 21 02:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Most of the developed world is pretty much in line when it comes to income distribution, but not the U.S., Brett Arends asserts, where the results are more in line with Zimbabwe, Argentina and El Salvador. The average Fortune 500 CEO pockets $10.5M a year, more than 300 times the average worker's pay.  [View news story]
    Like picking beans?
    Jul 21 11:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Most of the developed world is pretty much in line when it comes to income distribution, but not the U.S., Brett Arends asserts, where the results are more in line with Zimbabwe, Argentina and El Salvador. The average Fortune 500 CEO pockets $10.5M a year, more than 300 times the average worker's pay.  [View news story]
    Right, my dad bought a new car every three years, but spent next to nothing on anything else (five kids with one bathroom to share).
    Jul 21 11:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Last World War Helped the Economy: Why Not Another One? [View article]
    Like obesity - we spend billions on junk food and than billions of gyms and fad diets to get rid of the excess. Could you imagine unemployment if people did not eat junk food and the extra 500 calories per day?
    Jul 21 11:52 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Most of the developed world is pretty much in line when it comes to income distribution, but not the U.S., Brett Arends asserts, where the results are more in line with Zimbabwe, Argentina and El Salvador. The average Fortune 500 CEO pockets $10.5M a year, more than 300 times the average worker's pay.  [View news story]
    What happened to those who create for the satisfaction of it, and not for the money? In my business, winemakers are not paid well, but boy, do we love what we create.
    Jul 21 10:11 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Jeremy Grantham throws in the towel, switching to the deflation side of the punditry. "Even if we get intermittently rising commodity prices," he says, "the downward pressure on prices from weak wages and weak demand seems to me now to be much the larger factor." Yet surprisingly, he says "fixed-income is desperately unappealing" - his favorite asset class is "U.S. high-quality stocks."  [View news story]
    Probably not a good explanation - but there are billions going into 401K plans - a majority of workers put a couple of check marks next to funds they have no clue about, and that money has to be allocated as directed. Have I made another nonsensical comment?
    Jul 20 11:35 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Last World War Helped the Economy: Why Not Another One? [View article]
    Yeah, but the US through the Marshall plan helped rebuild Europe, using our government bought parts.
    The author states that we spent our way out of the depression, but it won't work this time. Why not? And I question how much savings people had at that time, when 24% were unemployed at the beginning of the Depression. The government just paid the wages and pressured people to buy bonds with their earnings (think of all the patriotic posters during that time).
    I still find it difficult to believe that building things that blow up revives and economy, nobody is buying them.
    I've asked on this site a few times for ideas of why the Great Depression ended, haven't heard any decent explanations.
    Jul 20 09:36 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China is now the world's biggest energy consumer, knocking the U.S. off a perch it held for more than a century, the International Energy Agency says. That status isn't likely to change, as China will require $4T in total energy investments over the next 20 years to keep feeding its economy and avoid power blackouts and fuel shortages.  [View news story]
    Right - the winner isn't who uses the most energy, the winner is who uses the least amount of energy to produce each widget.
    Jul 19 01:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China is now the world's biggest energy consumer, knocking the U.S. off a perch it held for more than a century, the International Energy Agency says. That status isn't likely to change, as China will require $4T in total energy investments over the next 20 years to keep feeding its economy and avoid power blackouts and fuel shortages.  [View news story]
    I agree that one child per couple will greatly effect the Chinese economy in the future. Aging has hurt every mature society on this planet. No easy answers to that problem, the young can only work so hard to allocate their wages to taking care of the old, especially when the demographics edge to an older and older population. China will be hit more suddenly than other countries.
    Jul 19 10:07 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • China is now the world's biggest energy consumer, knocking the U.S. off a perch it held for more than a century, the International Energy Agency says. That status isn't likely to change, as China will require $4T in total energy investments over the next 20 years to keep feeding its economy and avoid power blackouts and fuel shortages.  [View news story]
    Ah, why wouldn't they require more power, they have a hell of a lot more people. The US will remain tops for per capita power consumption for a long time to come. Why a race to see who can gorge the most, rather than who can produce the most widgets with the least amount of power consumption.
    I don't buy this stifling of innovation. We have an administration that has turned back to science. The bible is no longer the greatest tech book ever written. Taxes have not gone up on innovators, more regs have not been written closing down garage inventors. More paranoia.
    Jul 19 10:02 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Since raising taxes in a weak economy is not a good idea, Mark Thoma says the Bush tax cuts should be extended... sort of. He would allow the tax cuts to expire on the rich and transfer the savings to low- and middle-income households. "That way there won’t be any decline in aggregate demand... and since the transfer is from high savers to low savers, it could even provide a bit of additional stimulus."  [View news story]
    Government has never shut down the organizations you mentioned. I don't see the government closing down churches around me, I see more being built. The Catholic/Christian/Jewish school system in my area is as strong as ever, and very active in the greater community. There are no government run soup kitchens in my area, but a myriad run by many different volunteer groups.
    You make it sound as if every government worker was as slimy as a GS exec, they are not. Most are hard working people who are not elected and they do go to church and they do care for community and people.
    Politicians invoke God now more than ever, because they have to - because not believing in God is certain to get one NOT elected. Politicians are forced to seem as if they get on their knees every night and pray for guidance, because we the people expect it.
    Do I believe in easy welfare - no way!! Do I believe in paying single women for popping babies - no way!! Do I believe in the government helping out with healthcare for a kid whose hard working mother and father can't afford it - yes!! Too many of you on this site have had easy lives and don't realize that there are people out there that just don't have the smarts to make a lot of money, yet they work their guts out. I've got guys working for me who fit that mold. And I hired them by looking at their applications, not by a community referal. I've been burnt by someone I know suggesting a buddy.
    Jul 16 07:27 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Since raising taxes in a weak economy is not a good idea, Mark Thoma says the Bush tax cuts should be extended... sort of. He would allow the tax cuts to expire on the rich and transfer the savings to low- and middle-income households. "That way there won’t be any decline in aggregate demand... and since the transfer is from high savers to low savers, it could even provide a bit of additional stimulus."  [View news story]
    People who make $50,000 pay a lot less in taxes now, so you would be raising taxes on the middle class.
    Jul 16 07:02 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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