Seeking Alpha

eagle1003

eagle1003
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View eagle1003's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • 10 Remarkable Gold And Silver Trends Going Into 2015 [View article]
    This author has done a good job of bring together several conditions that are relevant to the direction of the precious metals markets. Nice work.
    Jan 6, 2015. 07:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Gold In 2015 - When The Russian Empire Strikes Back [View article]
    John: Absolutely. Anyone with an unlimited supply of freshly minted cash can drive down or prevent any commodity from rising when ever naked short selling is permitted, that is, so long as buyers are content with 'on paper' ownership rather than taking actual delivery (as in gold and the COMEX). The CME group, owners of the COMEX, offers special volume discounts to the Central banks. Read this: http://bit.ly/ZM4fTO. It is all explained quite well in the following article: http://bit.ly/1tqteVf

    Sorta sounds like a rigged game, doesn't it?
    Jan 1, 2015. 12:57 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • GLD: What Will It Take To Resurrect The Gold Bull Market? [View article]
    I would like to see an article on how much it costs to produce paper gold and what limit supply limits there may be for such 'gold'.
    Dec 31, 2014. 11:55 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why I'm A Bearish Gold Bug [View article]
    Excellent article! Well put concerning the way gold prices are controlled via the paper ETF's. Every time one of us plays gold by buying a gold ETF instead of physical gold, we are playing right into the hands of those who don't want to see gold rise. (the 'protectors' of fiat currency)

    The CME doesn't offer huge trading discounts to central banks without good reason and wouldn't do so if there were no demand from the central banks. It is the central banks that use short selling, in an unlimited fashion, to crush any exuberant demand for paper gold and guess what, it works! Mean while, the smart money buys physical gold at prices far below what they should be while dumb investors continue to pour money into the paper market where conversion to real gold is made difficult or, in some cases, impossible.

    As the author points out, the disparity between paper prices and physical is what we need to watch. A real breakout for gold will undoubtedly be accompanied by a rapid and substantial increase in the premium. Hopefully as the disparity grows ever larger, the paper ETFs will be exposed for the scam that they are.
    Dec 30, 2014. 07:18 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Will 2015 Be The Turning Point For Metals? [View article]
    The declining metals and other commodity prices may be telling us something about the the state of the 'recovery' that the media has been yapping about.
    Dec 30, 2014. 07:05 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • GDX - The Way To Play Gold In 2015 [View article]
    Markos: Your advice to play gold via GDX rather than by way of individual miners, is sound. If gold continues it's slide during 2015, and that is quite possible, there will be bankruptcies and buyouts at dirt cheap prices, An investor could suffer serious losses. GDX, being an ETF, will never go bankrupt.

    I remain long gold and short the S&P. Being short the S&P has been painful but a significant correction of several weeks duration is in the cards.
    Dec 28, 2014. 05:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Tough Year Lies Ahead For The U.S. Coal Industry [View article]
    The coal stocks are a crap shoot. Some of the bigger players aren't going to make it.
    Dec 28, 2014. 11:13 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Still No Reason To Buy The Dip In Natural Gas [View article]
    I live in western Canada and it is balmy for this time of year. A warm December has crushed any chance of a spike in prices. The shorts got lucky. If January is also abnormally warm, $2.50, or lower, is almost a certainty. I am waiting until mid to late January before looking at the long side.
    Dec 27, 2014. 05:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Oil Price Crisis: What Is The Economic Cost To The U.S.? [View article]
    Falling gasoline prices are not what most people would call a "crisis". If this is what deflation is all about, let's have more of it!
    Dec 27, 2014. 05:39 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 2014's Trash Could Be 2015's Treasure [View article]
    Eric, good article. Would you care to venture into uncharted waters and tell us what sectors you see as the big performers for 2015?
    Dec 27, 2014. 11:04 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Fires Still Burning In The Oil Patch [View article]
    Just about every analyst is giving the Saudis full credit for the current weakness in crude oil pricing. Why? What, exactly, are the Saudi's 'doing' that is different from other oil producers? NOTHING! All are producing at levels not much different that what existed one year ago. It is the high cost American producers that will eventually be forced, by market pricing, to cut back on their elevated crude output. It is quite conceivable that imports from the Middle east will rise once again as American oil becomes increasing unprofitable. I don't $20 oil in the cards. The bankers will make sure that American production is scaled back and probably, very quickly.

    If the US economy is truly expanding as rapidly as indicated by the recently announced 5% increase in quarterly GDP, then increased demand should sop up much of excess crude production. However, if oil demand continues to slide in America, we can be reasonably certain that the government produced GDP numbers are nothing more than a complete lie and that something is very wrong with the economy.
    Dec 26, 2014. 11:27 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Share Repurchases, Stock Sales [View article]
    Large scale corporate buybacks have exposed the EPS as the rather useless indicator that it is. A corporation that buys back 10% of it's float could experience a 5% reduction in actual earnings while at the same time, there would an improvement in it's EPS. Smoke and mirrors.

    In my opinion. corporate buybacks are a 'gift' to high net worth shareholders (including their own executives) that allow those individuals to cash out at inflated prices without having to wait for the retail customer to step up to the plate, an event that may not occur for a very long time.

    Without the buybacks, how much lower would the S&P be right now and what's the probable outcome when the buybacks dry up?
    Dec 26, 2014. 10:30 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Coal A Dead Commodity? [View article]
    Coal prices are moving down. Expect more bankruptcies. I think Walter Energy is next.
    Dec 22, 2014. 10:58 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Has QE3 Really Come To An End? [View article]
    Excellent reference! The CME would not be offering discounts to the Central Banks if there was no demand.
    Dec 21, 2014. 12:14 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It Seems Like Hedge Funds Are Jumping Into The Gold Market [View article]
    This author's analysis appears to be badly flawed. Given that the dollar value of GDX was up 458 million and that of the triple leveraged NUGT was up less than 9 million, I fail to see how it can be concluded that the hedge funds and speculators are taking up a large short interest. In fact, large jump in the trading volume of any ETF is indicative is increased interest by all traders not necessarily those who are those of the hedge fund variety.

    Since all ETF sponsors create new units in order to meet demand, what evidence is there to indicate that there has been a significant increase in the short interest? None that I can tell from what has been presented in this article.

    The hedge funds have earned a well deserved reputation for being on the wrong side of major moves so I prefer to believe that the recent interest in the miners is the so called 'smart money' that is behind the surge in dollar value for GDX.





    Dec 20, 2014. 11:19 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
1,628 Comments
2,407 Likes