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Bryce_in_TX

Bryce_in_TX
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  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    La Marque,

    There is much less risk in the mutual fund account than in an equity like "O", IMO.
    Aug 13 03:49 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    La Marque,

    I use the mutual fund like I used to use a money market fund, to let idle cash work until it is invested.
    Aug 13 03:22 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    Yes, in a year I would have missed out on $2.10 per share of dividends. But if the price of "O" declines to a more fair value of the stock, like $41 or less, then I have saved myself some capital depreciation, by a good margin more than the $2.10 I would have made on the dividends. Buying "O" at $44 a share doesn't make sense to me. I'll let you know how it comes out.


    Hoping for a good correction to buy more "O". But, at present the price is too high to buy more.
    Aug 13 03:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How Do You Hold Cash When Realty Income Or AT&T Are Available? [View article]
    Instead of having my reserves in cash, I use Fidelity's Foating Rate High Income Fund to stash cash until I am ready to invest it in the market. It's yield is about 3.33 to 3.5% with much less risk than Realty Income or AT&T in share price fluctuation. I disagree that getting into Realty Income at a fair price isn't important. I own 125 shares currently at an average of $37. 85 per share. I won't buy again until it's at $41 or below. Waiting up to 12 or 14 months to buy more at such a price will still be better than buying it right now.

    You have your opinion, but it doesn't make economic sense to me.
    Aug 13 12:08 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    " "Gain" or "loss" is theoretical until you sell."
    Do you see what I'm getting at?"

    That can be true. A gain or loss can just be on paper. Example: the GM Bond I held to maturity through Edward Jones. I held it to its maturity, when it was worth its face value, though losing as much as 20 to 25% of its value before maturity. I lost no principal and earned 5.4% interest from the 5 year Note.

    Also, while it may be true that Stephen Mayo may be beating me in a very short time frame, to me it is irrelevant. I don't count my return over such a short span of time. That's why I said it was irrelevant, because to me it is.

    Sorry for using the term "ridiculous. But, for me the short time frame is irrelevant. Now, if it were for a year it would be relevant to me.
    Aug 10 05:34 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    I don't get you, Steve. I am in long term, because I nor anyone else can successfully time the market on a consistent basis. I don't see how staying long, through ups and downs, because of what I just stated is irrational.
    Aug 8 04:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Tesla: 4 Reality Checks For Bulls To Consider [View article]
    Lensman03,

    I have already addressed everything you brought up today. I am not going to rehash it. I have no investment of any kind in Tesla. Take the hate and lies elsewhere.
    Aug 8 03:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Tesla Will Become The Victim Of Its Own Success [View article]
    I have to object to the GAAP results. It does not reflect revenues which will be realized once a lessee keeps the car at the end of a 3 year lease. In all likelihood, the GAAP results are far too conservative (understated).
    Aug 8 09:35 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    "First you say "Your comment is true thus far, like it would be as well for anyone who pulled out of the market right before the meltdown began in 2008."
    as if this admission advances your argument, when it does not"

    Many stayed out of the market as it bottomed in 2009, and stayed out as it started to slowly rise over the last five years. I am saying that if you try and time the market that you will likely miss some upside when you get back in. Anyone trying to time the market is likely to be wrong. That is completely consistent with what I have been saying.

    "If you're nice, I'll tell you when to get back in."

    You are the one with an ego, IMO. I will stay invested,thanks any way. And I see no time horizon on your original comment: "Every day that goes by, the author has outperformed every commentator on this board." Sorry, if I misinterpreted what you were saying.

    The market was down today, but all of my holdings were up, so I still don't understand how you could know the author has beaten every commentator on this thread.
    Aug 7 04:42 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    Your comments are meaningless because the time frame is too short. I receive dividends and distributions monthly and quarterly. That figures into the calculation over a meaningful time period of a year or longer.

    He may be doing better over a week or two, but the time frame is too short to have any significance. Also, in the long run, I expect to have a decent rate of return by staying invested in the market. I'm in the market for dividends as much as capital appreciation. Our goals are probably different, making any side by side comparisons meaningless.

    Bottomline, you can't time the market on a consistant basis. Anyone who believes they can is fooling themselves.
    Aug 7 05:45 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    Your comment is true thus far, like it would be as well for anyone who pulled out of the market right before the meltdown began in 2008. Stephen may well beat those who stay vested in the market through its ups and downs, but it requires perfect timing which depends more on luck than anything else.

    I hold that it is a ridiculous, meaningless comment.
    Aug 6 09:46 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Day I Sold Everything [View article]
    Stev53e,

    Man, you are judging on a very short term basis. Ridiculous comment.
    Aug 6 06:24 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can The Regulators Afford Missing Herbalife? [View article]
    "failed to identify the biggest accounting fraud in history."

    I agree it was accounting fraud, but that is not how it was prosecuted. It was prosecuted as individual security's fraud and insider trading, not as an accounting fraud case. The sentences were light, IMO. No one got what the deserved. BTW, it's Arthur Andersen, not Arthur Anderson.

    And there may have been prosecutorial misconduct with the case.

    http://bit.ly/1shVDxD

    It makes me wonder who is minding the store?
    Aug 3 01:20 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Herbalife Revenues Materially Overstated? [View article]
    Doc Brew,

    I don't know that one quarter of data is sufficient to make that determination, probably not. However, I don't see justification for changing the revenue recognition to NO revenue recognition until the 3 or 12 month time horizons have expired because such change would likely understate revenues as bad or worse as any overstatements of revenues due to the new refund guarantee. The logical thing to do is to continue to accrue allowances for returns based upon historical data and adjust those allowances on a quarterly basis based upon historical data. That is what Herbalife is doing.

    Someone would have to explain to me how Herbalife and PWC might have a large liability for doing the rational, logical thing by accruing allowances using their current methodology. I don't see it.
    Aug 3 05:07 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Tesla Could Be Back At $260 In No Time [View article]
    David at Imperial Beach,

    In regards to not having to pay out the repurchase guarantees due to a higher resale value - that appears in question at the present.

    Here is what Edmunds had to say about the Model S in their overall evaluation of the car:

    "Bottom Line: The Model S is a fast, comfortable and technologically brilliant luxury sedan, but numerous problems with its touchscreen, tires and drivetrain make it hard to recommend."

    http://edmu.in/1lWClc4

    Here are two other recent articles indicating the resale value may not hold up:

    http://buswk.co/1nYKK4K

    http://bit.ly/1nYRYpe

    If I buy a 3 year old Model S in 2016, I have one year left on the drivetrain warranty, assuming an extended warranty wasn't purchased. I believe I'd be thinking of trying to get some knocked off the purchase price in case I end up having to have multiple repairs done on the drive train in years 4 and beyond, or have to have the drivetrain replaced altogether. That doesn't bode well for the resale value holding up. So, I don't know about your assessment that no resale guarantee amounts will be paid out.
    Aug 2 03:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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