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Samuel H

Samuel H
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  • Tesla: Lack Of Management Focus Remains A Concern [View article]
    Competition? What competition?
    Jul 20, 2015. 11:49 PM | 10 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    And never driven.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:25 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    Why would you drive 500 miles at a moment's notice without planning? That makes no sense.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:17 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    Tesla's battery packs are expected to last 8-10 yrs with no more than 80% degradation. They are NOT going to suddenly quit working, the range just very slowly goes down until you decide to replace it.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:15 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    Tesla's Superchargers will be "free forever" (cost is rolled into purchase price), but not other EV chargers.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    That's not true at all. The majority of houses in the Northeast could have solar panels for zero down. It's just that people either don't know, are somewhat apprehensive, or just don't care.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:09 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • How A Part-Time Uber Driver Can Buy A Tesla [View article]
    Your math is off, and comparing new to used is ingenous. A 2015 Honda Fit gets 36 mpg combined (actual tested mileage is close to this). If one drove 20,000 miles per year, assuming $3/gal gas prices, it would cost $1,667 per year to fuel it. After 5 yrs, that's $8,335. Maintenance and higher insurance vs EV would bring that figure up. Monthly fuel cost would be $139/mon. in addition to the lease or loan payments which ends up being a lot more than if you leased a Nissan Leaf.

    If one leased a Nissan Leaf for $199/month, it would only cost $62.50/mon for electrons at $.12/kWh (national average) if you drove 20,000 miles/yr.
    Jun 20, 2015. 07:04 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Chevrolet Bolt EV Spotted On Test Track; Does GM Have A 1-2 Year Lead On Tesla's Model 3? [View article]
    Rolling out a network of hundreds of single chargers rather than charging stations shouldn't be too difficult. However, 50kW is NOT fast, and single chargers scattered around the country are not very convenient for traveling. If there are 8 chargers, the chances of all of them being blocked is far less than a single charging point.

    Upgrading a 50kWh charger to 100kWh is not easy either. If you have ever been to a Supercharger station, you would notice the large boxes containing electrical equipment for the station. CHAdeMO chargers (62.5kWh) can be used to charge the Model S with an adaptor. I'm sure that Tesla will make an adaptor for CCS DC "fast" chargers (50-70kWh) sometime in the future.

    The Tesla Model S will eventually be able to use all other chargers via adaptors, but only it can use Tesla's awesome Superchargers. This charger rollout is a PLUS for Tesla!
    Jun 14, 2015. 04:54 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Tesla's Competition Does Not Have A Lead Over Tesla [View article]
    GM has mentioned that they only plan to build ~30,000 Bolts a year, not 100,000. I think the reason is that they are battery supply constrained.

    The Bolt will probably need 50kWh to have a 200-mile range. The Model III will need more. Elon Musk has said that the Tesla Model III will have a 200-mile real-world range. The 60kWh Model S did not have 200-mile real world range, but the 70D does. A 50kWh battery would give a Model III (80% smaller, 80% lighter, slightly more aerodynamic) a 200-mile EPA range, but that's not 200 miles of real-world range. I think that the Model III will have a range slightly under the Model S 70D requiring a 55-60kWh battery pack.

    The Chevy Bolt is also expected to arrive per GM with a price of $37,500, $30K after the $7,500 federal tax credit. That's more than the expected starting price of the Tesla Model III which is supposed to be $35,000.
    Jun 14, 2015. 04:13 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Volvo Makes An SUV Out Of The BMW i8 To Compete With Tesla [View article]
    Not so. Because of the low power of the EV system, almost all acceleration will cause the ICE to cycle on. Unless you drive like grandma (0-40 mph in 30 sec.), you'd find yourself burning gas everyday.
    May 26, 2015. 12:42 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Volvo Makes An SUV Out Of The BMW i8 To Compete With Tesla [View article]
    That's some serious humor right there. I like you Anton, although I disagree with you on certain points. You're alright.
    May 26, 2015. 12:10 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Volvo Makes An SUV Out Of The BMW i8 To Compete With Tesla [View article]
    http://bit.ly/1HHGrBI
    The take rate for the PHEV version has been "over 20%". On the low side (assuming 30,000 preorders), 21% of 30K would be 6,300 orders and 29% of 30K would be 8,700. Both of those numbers are far below the 20-27K estimated preorders for the Tesla Model X. Stating that their are more Volvo XC90 PHEV preorders than Tesla Model X preorders is a bald face lie.
    May 26, 2015. 12:01 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Volvo Makes An SUV Out Of The BMW i8 To Compete With Tesla [View article]
    The Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid is absolutely worth the purchase price as it actually is a performance vehicle in every metric. Third row seats are overrated. They're even going to be optional on the Model X.
    May 25, 2015. 11:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Volvo Makes An SUV Out Of The BMW i8 To Compete With Tesla [View article]
    The sales of the $77,200 Porsche Cayenne E-hybrid which is basically the same thing as the Volvo minus the back two seats have been abysmal despite the incredible all-around performance and quality that Porsche is known for. The sales for this Volvo are going to be about the same. The same goes for the upcoming Audi PHEV SUV. Less than 20 miles of EV range is not worth all the extra hassle, weight, cost, and complexity of the system.

    The average daily distance that Americans drive is 35 miles although many drive considerably more than that. That's why the Volt 1.0 was designed with the range that it had. PHEVs with 15 miles of real-world EV range will burn gas almost every day, defeating the purpose. You mind as well have gotten a diesel and saved $$K on the purchase price. Until PHEVs can hit 35ish miles on electricity alone, they won't really be competitors with long range EVs. I think the popularity of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV and Chevy Volt which can both cover >30 miles on electrons backs up what I'm saying.

    Anton mischaracterizes EV and PHEV owners as a bunch of greenies. Eco-friendliness is not the biggest reason people buy EVs or PHEVs, although that is the reason that 38% of Leaf owners bought the quirky car. Volt owners (who tend to drive a lot) did it mostly for the fuel (money) savings, Tesla Model S owners bought for a host of reasons (performance, Made in USA, range, beauty, etc.) other than environmental benefit, and Prius PHEV owners did it mostly for HOV lane access. Almost all PHEVs owners would love to go all-electric if it met all of their needs.
    May 25, 2015. 11:28 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sorry Tesla, But No Battery Cigar [View article]
    The i8 is not vaporware at all. I saw one driving down the interstate near Van Nuys, CA. It's a very nice car to look at! It is however an expensive, limited production eco-sports car that blasts from 0-60 mph on an incredible 3.6 sec. and handles amazingly. It has laser headlights for goodness sake!

    It's not a Tesla competitor though.
    May 20, 2015. 11:30 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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