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tripleblack

tripleblack
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  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Single source numbers share the same problems as single source suppliers. Trust is problem number 1.
    Apr 23, 2015. 06:37 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Not good news for Lynas, of course. JPM out with an "its overdone" headline, they expect Siemens to play the field rather than tie to long term commitments. They are probably correct, since MCP is unlikely to have much supply available for most of the heavier end of the REE spectrum...

    Still, it is likely to put a damper on Lynas.

    Restructuring of MCP (and Lynas as well) is still very much in the cards, and probably some time over the next 12 months.
    Apr 16, 2015. 10:04 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Quickchat #279, March 19, 2015 [View instapost]
    New QC here: http://seekingalpha.co...
    Apr 16, 2015. 09:59 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    New Quickchat: http://seekingalpha.co...
    Mar 19, 2015. 09:45 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    Either way, "as" or "by", its a point to consider. My brother and three nephews are among the tens of millions of employees who abruptly became "independent contractors" in the construction trades when their boss encountered Obamacare regulations, for instance). The typical larger project which might have had a dozen subs (all with large numbers of employees) has changed to hundreds of subs (but no employees as such).

    I believe the number of Americans working as traditional full time employees is at an all time low, with subs and part timers at an all time high. This means that ALL such employment statistics are suspect, particularly when compared to pre-Obamacare numbers.
    Mar 17, 2015. 03:19 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Japanese "support" is quite schizophrenic. Japanese corporations are on both sides of the contest, with some companies operating separate divisions operating at odds with one another (assuming Japanese independence from Chinese single source problems is, indeed, the overall goal).

    I have lost faith that Japan (or the US or EU) really have an eye on this particular ball. Actions speak very loudly.
    Mar 17, 2015. 12:59 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Bifurcation of Lynas into separate Australian (Mount Weld) and Malay (LAMP) companies is coming. Look for sale of Lynas Malaysia to a Chinese entity, following the split.

    As has been stated here before, indeed, China wins.
    Mar 16, 2015. 02:10 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    MSFT is no longer firmly tethered to computer sales. In fact, I would keep an eye on their gamer business first and foremost. I don't track their games, but a good season for their consoles can compensate pretty easily for a weak overall computer sales environment. Same observation applies to Sony and Nintendo. Sony in particular depends upon game sales to compensate for the commoditization of their primary electronics business, and the risks for their non-gaming media business.
    Mar 12, 2015. 10:57 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Scandium is still a Catch 22 situation. The theory has been (for a long time) that demand for scandium alloys would be huge AFTER "someone" invests big in establishing a reliable supply at a reasonable market price.

    "Someone" has not stepped forward as yet, and is not currently visible.
    Mar 12, 2015. 09:16 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    A strong US$ (which of course currently means a similarly strong Chinese RMB) would logically equate to some measure of Chinese government spending to capitalize on low commodity prices. This would run counter to the collective wisdom anticipating Chinese demand retrenchment, of course, but we should remember that the Chinese, unlike the US and the EU, plan far ahead.

    They are also prone to engineering market spasms that they can capitalize upon, including their internal markets (which they view as a ready resource utilized in a very predatory manner).
    Mar 11, 2015. 09:47 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    When it comes to "political science", government always gets what it pays for. No coincidences.
    Mar 11, 2015. 09:39 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • REE/Strategic Minerals Concentrator, March 18, 2014 [View instapost]
    Observe the recent dramatic drop in LED lighting costs. This is partially involved with the REEs, of course, and could be a very large new market going forward. I use LED lights in my portable system at the art shows, and the prices for the bulbs dropped 33% in 2014 (from $15 to $10), and another 50% thus far in 2015 (from $10 to $5).

    Note the very obsolete info on this Tasman site on this subject: http://bit.ly/1KW2wRM

    At current prices the economic case for LED lighting makes most incandescent and fluorescent competition similarly obsolete. I installed an LED bulb in my garage light which burns 24/7 4 years ago, and it is still going strong. That bulb originally cost me $25, but is available now for about $6. Energy cost savings alone saved me over $40 (thus far) compared to a CFL equivalent, not to mention the labor of climbing a tall ladder to swap out bulbs.

    Note that Heavy REEs are involved with lighting demand.
    Mar 11, 2015. 09:36 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Stability Of The European Union (23) January 1, 2015. [View instapost]
    I am beginning to suspect that Greece will NOT be allowed to leave. I think dire military threats have been made. This sort of thing has never been aired in the media, nor whispered, but it would seem to pose a logical explanation for current events.

    All well and good to enter negotiations thinking that economic consequences are the end game...
    Mar 10, 2015. 11:22 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    I believe the interest rate scare is just another false alarm. The over priced dollar will outweigh other factors. Zirp to infinity.
    Mar 9, 2015. 12:39 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QuickChat #278, February 5, 2015 [View instapost]
    Pro-business administration in India has a chance to turn it around, but this has happened before, with mixed results. I consider regulations regarding gold imports and infrastructure build-out to be key items to watch for signs of shifts in policy.

    India is in an excellent position to capitalize on the dramatic drop in energy and industrial commodity prices, to an extent greater than China (who after all is a dominant producer of many commodities). Alone among BRIC, India will gain from the current commodity crash rather than lose.

    Should the commodity markets rebound, however, India will move in the opposite direction, essentially swapping places with BRC.

    Given that we are seeing signs of the Saudis easing their oil war (reports of higher prices from them this week), the India headlines might represent a peak rather than a long term trend.
    Mar 5, 2015. 09:16 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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