Seeking Alpha

Miguel Arnot

Miguel Arnot
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View Miguel Arnot's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    Six - that was a terrific example. Thanks for the link.
    Oct 20 10:48 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    Scoot,

    I love my two railroad stocks CSX & NSC, neither of which made the list. I think it's like you say - you have to cut the list at some point. Apparently my cut off point is after I own all the great ones! I have my eye on both CNI and UNP.
    Oct 19 04:28 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    "How did I miss KO."

    Obviously you are running low on Stella! I think Nadel has agreed to airlift in a case or two...
    Oct 19 04:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    IMO, the best time to buy a company is on a decent pull back and right after they beat and raise, not on a 52 wk high.
    Oct 19 03:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    Dividend House - that was one of the best posts I've ever seen! Great list and very sharp way to go about building your portfolio.
    Oct 18 07:41 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    "Please note some utilities. People are nuts if they don't include utilities in a long-term portfolio. That's right, I said nuts. ... Ha!"

    Chowder,

    I definitely have to agree with you on this one!

    I know a lot of people don't compare their portfolio to the S&P but I do it both ways, up and down. When the S&P declined by over 8% mine was down only 4.1%. It's the utilities and just great dividend stocks in general that can really reduce risk in a portfolio.
    Oct 18 12:31 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Exact Sciences: Revisiting Cologuard's Value [View article]
    I bought EXAS for an average price of $13 some months ago and think this one is good for the long haul.

    Good article but I was surprised not to see a mention of the Mayo Clinic and their decision to offer Cologuard.
    Oct 16 10:29 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    "MSFT an insult"

    I first bought MSFT in 2010 and the dividend has doubled since then. No complaints here.
    Oct 16 07:25 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The New Nifty Fifty, Part 1 - Dividend Growth Style [View article]
    Mike - very sharp article! I have 35 of the stocks you list in the tables.

    ADP, UTX and MKC are must own stocks for me but they appear on the list of 4 panelists. Of course, we can't own everything so everyone's list will vary. Also, surprised to not see any mention of ITW and SWK.

    Terrific article.
    Oct 15 07:57 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Let's Talk About The Nifty Fifty And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    What would be the point? You've already formed your opinion and it would be a waste of my time to answer questions you aren't interested in.

    "My comment was my opinion (which I made clear) and so it can't be "incorrect"."
    Oct 8 09:51 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Seadrill: Falling Knife Or Not, The Fundamentals Say 'Buy Me' [View article]
    When I look at fundamentals I try to look at everything, including decisions made by management. The SDRL board of directors has stupidly raised the dividend nearly every quarter. It was an unnecessary strategy with a yield that is currently over 16%. Can they maintain this?

    With the current glut of oil around the world, what exactly is going to help drive up shares of deep sea oil drillers like SDRL, RIG and ESV?
    Oct 8 01:58 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Let's Talk About The Nifty Fifty And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Six,

    I don't know how long you have been investing but once you learn a method it's not that hard to include (or to replace it with) the next one.

    In my case, I used index funds for over 20 years during my accumulation years. Not much to learn about indexing. It's easy and it works. I've explained what I did elsewhere in this thread. All you have to do is just keep adding to good index funds (and carefully selected sector funds, e.g. healthcare) to build up a lot of money. What you cannot do is trade in and out of the funds. Out of the 3 methods this is the easiest.

    Do I need to explain how to pick Dividend Growth stocks?? If you don't understand how to do it, there are plenty of articles that explain how to be successful at DGI right here on SA. It's a great way to build an income stream and years ago I decided to switch out of index funds to build my own portfolio of dividend payers. 80% of my portfolio.

    The 3rd method is the hardest but if you are willing to put in the time and effort you can pick some pretty good stocks out there with great returns. 20% of my portfolio.

    So, as I've pointed out, the first 2 methods shouldn't be that difficult for anyone (the moron approach) so I'm not sure why you would be surprised that an investor could put that portion of the portfolio on autopilot and concentrate on the 3rd.
    Oct 7 08:55 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirees, You CAN Count On Dividend Stocks To Deliver From Here [View article]
    UK Div Investor,

    That's kind of what I do, in addition to really great US multinationals, I also buy foreign stocks that trade on our exchanges: BP, NGG, BTI, RDSB, NVS, ABEV, ABY, GSK, VOD, and a number of the Canadian stocks too. Having grown up and worked in international settings, I feel comfortable branching out like this.
    Oct 5 05:22 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Are You An Alfred E. Neuman Income Investor? [View article]
    "Though price and income volatility may be thicker than other income investments, higher-yielders virtually eliminate reliance on price and provide an accelerated path to achieving income needs/goals."

    Adam,

    Very nice article and my portfolio pretty much covers all of the bases you mention.

    Would you mind explaining just a bit more about the above statement? To me this is a brilliant way of describing high-yielders. I always think of it as yield (and secondary IPOs) that continually crush the price. Either way it does pretty much eliminate price as a consideration. The part I'm not sure about is what you mean by "provide an accelerated path to achieving income needs/goals." I can see that they would instantly provide the goal, but not much income growth after that, right?

    Good article and lots to think about.

    Miguel
    Oct 4 05:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Let's Talk About The Nifty Fifty And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Giorgio, Fish, Six, Boom,

    "Define "average". I certainly can't."

    When it comes to investing, unfortunately the term "average investor" is a polite way of saying most investors (can't beat the S&P.) As I stated elsewhere to Pen, I don't think most investors on SA are "average" so I would expect many to do as well if not better than the index, even if that isn't your goal.

    "Bogle made index funds popular. Do you think he'd advocate any other way of investing?"

    Yes, I actually think he would advocate another way of investing if he thought it was better. This guy has spent his life trying to help people invest properly. It's a fact that most people (again I am not referring to all people here on SA) cannot beat the S&P, so therefore, the best route for them is indexing (the "moron approach"). Careful with thinking you are better than the moron approach though. True buy and hold, no matter whether it is individual stocks or index funds is very hard to beat for a multitude of reasons, mostly related to investors getting scared and doing the wrong things.

    What I don't like is the continual intolerance shown here on SA toward different investing styles. I've tried 3 and done quite well with all of them:

    I find it hard to pass over comments by people who say low cost index funds don't work. That is flat out wrong. Index funds and ETFs do work and work spectacularly well. I know this because that is how I built a large part of my portfolio when I was younger. All you have to do is buy the Vanguard VFINX which follows the S&P 500. If you want to out perform the S&P, in addition, buy several complementary funds like the VGHCX and VPMCX that have a history of out performing the index. How do I know this? Well, I had my money in index funds for years and did super well and out performed the S&P.

    I also find it hard to accept when posters try to say DGI doesn't work. That is also wrong. It DOES work and I know it works because for years now I have mostly been in individual dividend paying stocks. People who say DGI doesn't work don't know what they are talking about. It must be pure stupidity or ignorance that makes them post comments to the contrary.

    And finally, there are those that would never buy a non-dividend payer because "they aren't being paid to wait" or "the gains are unrealized". I also buy individual, non-div, stocks, and have done very well with them. One has to take more care in this category than index funds or aristocrat div stocks but the returns are spectacular.
    Oct 3 05:51 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
847 Comments
687 Likes