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joro_ianev

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  • Why Does The New York Times Want Government to Make Housing Unaffordable? [View article]
    Dean,

    Excellent article. As to NYT editorials, well, the newspaper has become a mouthpiece of the White House and Democrats, in general. It does not 'think', it just rolls with the punches.
    May 26, 2011. 01:12 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Coming Mobile Innovation Is Not in Data, But in Voice [View article]
    Kevin,

    I am not sure Microsoft + Nokia makes sense... unless you think their strategy is to follow Apple and RIMM into vertical integration of its software to hardware. Microsoft, like Google, has so far stayed away from phone/tablet hardware and both have been quite successful in their space. RIMM is slowly disappearing. Apple is doing marvelous only due to its design/marketing brilliance -- something that Microsoft sorely lacks.
    May 26, 2011. 01:06 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The sharp drop in fuel prices shows that the dramatic rise that began last September was driven more by Wall Street speculation, not by supply and demand influences, Oil Price Information Service's Tom Kloza says. "This was a combination of hysteria and euphoria for the speculators. You had the panic mentality of the crowd who collectively acted like blockheads."  [View news story]
    Bear,

    How about lower consumption around the globe? Or more supply from Russia, Venezuela, OPEC countries? Or change in expectations on middle-east regime failures?

    The politicos want to blame speculators, always. Remember a year ago it was 'speculators' that were attacking Greek bonds ... until it became painfully obvious Greece was living well beyond their abilities.

    Every time a politician cries out it is the speculators fault, be VERY afraid. Prices of fuel is going up. This is just a transitory decline. Bernanke will ensure there is QE3, because how can we say 'no' to our spoiled electorate?
    May 24, 2011. 09:54 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Europe's austerity has made its problems worse, Paul Krugman writes, and the renewed "confidence" that was supposed to revive the private sector when governments got their fiscal houses in order has failed to appear. The ECB acts "as if it is determined to provoke a financial crisis," raising rates and warning against any form of debt relief.  [View news story]
    Ah, the Krugman wisdom for the day ... Renewed confidence? ROFL! The confidence in the Greek government's ability to get their fiscal house in order has been eroded long time ago. The question is how long it will be before the electorate forces them to pull out of EU, because the sacred cows of the large, no-layoff civil service have been violated.
    May 23, 2011. 06:04 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The sharp drop in fuel prices shows that the dramatic rise that began last September was driven more by Wall Street speculation, not by supply and demand influences, Oil Price Information Service's Tom Kloza says. "This was a combination of hysteria and euphoria for the speculators. You had the panic mentality of the crowd who collectively acted like blockheads."  [View news story]
    You got to love these type of comments from armchair-general wannabes. Wasn't gas only $0.85 a gallon a few years ago? Is the run-up from those levels 'speculation' as well? And what happens if gas continues on an upward trajectory for the next 2 years -- will it be due to speculation again?

    Deny all you want, but that printing press down in the Fed basement surely has something to do with the price of oil going up. And it ain't transitory.
    May 23, 2011. 05:50 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Joe Weisenthal says Christine Lagarde's insistence that Greece move even faster on reforms if it wants more aid make her a fine choice to lead the IMF. This sort of philosophy has been IMF policy forever, "with horrible results."  [View news story]
    We don't. Dissolve them. But the immediate issue is what should be done in Greece - let it default or give it more money and push for restructuring. The IMF is absolutely correct that any new money should go with fast restructuring. No point the Greek unions getting 13th or even 14th month salary while the European taxpayer is footing the bill.
    May 20, 2011. 05:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Joe Weisenthal says Christine Lagarde's insistence that Greece move even faster on reforms if it wants more aid make her a fine choice to lead the IMF. This sort of philosophy has been IMF policy forever, "with horrible results."  [View news story]
    Oh, yeah, seems Joe is too eager to put taxpayers in the rest of Europe on the hook for a leisurely transition in Greece. Who doesn't like free money?
    May 20, 2011. 02:45 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Netflix: Beset With New Challenges [View article]
    Glad I think like Tilson as, frankly, I have not read his report! :-)

    You are right that NFLX is not going to be the only company that faces those headwinds. But the discussion here is whether there are headwinds in NFLX' sails that could derail its growth and profitability. The market does not price them, in my opinion.

    Whether it makes sense for competitors to replicate NFLX service is a matter of opinion. For some -- think HBO -- going the streaming route is a matter of survival. For others -- think cable and satellite companies -- it is a matter of growth. Until NFLX came about there was very little (actually close to none) change in the business model of cable providers. Then suddenly everyone is talking about 'cord cutting'. After a while even the slow people got it that they need to change their business model to grow and survive. Expect to see an expanded movies-on-demand feature being offered by all providers. Expect to see new hardware support via apps for all the competitive services -- no more NFLX hardware exclusivity.

    As for your cash cow comment, I am not sure there is much of a cash flow to milk.
    May 12, 2011. 10:11 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Budget deficit on track to exceed $1 trillion [View article]
    This article is so biased. It softly lands Obama into 'he inherited the mess from Bush and if it weren't for the Republicans to extend the tax cuts for the rich we would not have these deficits.'

    What few people in the press talk about is that we are still in a muck of stagflation and the government policies continue to perpetuate it. Why not show a chart of government discretionary spending over the last 10 years? Because it will show Obama increasing it ~ 23%. And if the article is crying about the increases in interest expense, guess what is going to happen to those in 10 years while we continue to run $1T+ deficits annually!

    With all the socialist rhetoric lately, I am becoming really pessimistic that the public doesn't get it that we MUST cut spending radically to avoid Greek-style meltdown. We MUST overhaul our tax code to expand the base and halve the rate. We MUST shove back the government from our lives, get it out of healthcare, education, research and transportation, and pair it down in environmental meddling, global police and welfare support for other countries. We MUST overhaul our welfare system so there is actual incentive to find work (it is much better to pay someone under a certain income threshold $1 for every $1 they earn than to pay them $1,400 a month to sit idle). Finally, we MUST get rid of unionism in government and tie benefits offered to government employees to those offered in the private sector.
    May 11, 2011. 05:28 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Netflix: Beset With New Challenges [View article]
    >>>NFLX is a niche.

    Analysts seem to disagree with that statement as they have 60+ million subscriber numbers in their projections. No niche attracts such number of masses.

    Everyone agrees that NFLX is the 900-lb gorilla in movie streaming over the internet. But the headwinds cannot be denied: 1) escalating content costs, 2) internet traffic caps, 3) market saturation, 4) competitor inroads.

    My dad has an NFLX subscriptions. He loves it. He has the time to watch many movies. He watches the old ones online, orders the new ones on DVDs. Incidentally he also has a Blockbuster's subscription because some movies on NFLX are rarely available. Now, here come the questions: How many people in the US who have the extra time to watch lots of movies have not already signed up for NFLX? If a consumer is already a subscriber for cable and internet and the provider expands its included (i.e. free) on-demand offerings would the need for NFLX not go away? If Hulu Plus adds older content to its new offerings wouldn't it be a very strong competitor to NFLX? If Amazon started a free streaming service for its premiere members would it not make sense for it to continue developing it into a strong NFLX competitor? Same for YouTube. And if 10 people are banging on your door wanting your stuff, would you not raise the price?

    Whether you see it or now, the competitive headwinds are there in force.
    May 11, 2011. 04:58 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The S&P warning on U.S. debt was silent on the real danger to the economy and the federal budget: Growth could be derailed by letting too-big-to-fail banks become irresponsible again or by allowing continually rising healthcare costs, Simon Johnson writes. He fears S&P's "broad-brush" warning could whip up debt hysteria and push policies that quickly undermine growth.  [View news story]
    Michael,

    I don't buy the argument that taxes NEED to go up. You have erroneous information that our taxes are too low (just add ALL taxes we pay, not just federal income taxes). They are not. Our issue is a spending issue. Only once in history has government spending been at this level as a percent of GDP -- it was during World War II.

    Your position -- actually it is Obama's position -- is that we need to raise taxes and cut spending less. Yet nobody is asking why we pumped up spending over the last 2 years so much? Is cutting from this hugely inflated spending level really 'cutting' or is it merely pairing down to prior levels, while just increasing taxes. Nobody can explain to me why we have to fund the huge government bureaucracy and their fat-cat compensation and benefits. And we need to stop hiding behind 'money for the poor' ideology: much of the money gets eaten by the bureaucracy or goes to pay people not to work. None of it does anything to give people an incentive to seek work and better their future.

    We do agree on Donald. I am no fan of his.
    Apr 22, 2011. 02:14 PM | 10 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The S&P warning on U.S. debt was silent on the real danger to the economy and the federal budget: Growth could be derailed by letting too-big-to-fail banks become irresponsible again or by allowing continually rising healthcare costs, Simon Johnson writes. He fears S&P's "broad-brush" warning could whip up debt hysteria and push policies that quickly undermine growth.  [View news story]
    Simon Johnson is a buffoon. I realize this is a personal attack, but it is absolutely warranted in this case. You won't see Simon talk about free markets anywhere. You won't see him talk about out-of-control government spending. You won't see him talk about the high degree of regulation which is killing competition and creating too-connected-to-fail companies in most of our industries. That's precisely why small business is dying here and why costs are going up. You also won't see him talk about the dangers of raising taxes and the flight of business and unemployment that will follow it. In short, Simon is ONLY concerned in pushing the agenda of banking regulation (where the IMF hopes to pick a bigger role) and the completion of the government take-over of healthcare.
    Apr 22, 2011. 01:41 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Netflix Back From the Dead ... Again [View article]
    to artbcpa:

    The issue you are forgetting is that NFLX does not have rights for international showing of most of their content. Therefore it must negotiate, again, with the content owners as it expands its operations in another country.
    Apr 21, 2011. 05:24 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nouriel Roubini strikes a positive note, saying fiscal issues in the U.S. are more manageable than any of the other developed nations. The reason: low government revenues as a percentage of GDP means there is plenty of room to adjust upward.  [View news story]
    What happens when the Fed stops monetizing and the rates shoot up? We will quickly shoot through all the past records as our debt keeps marching up and up.
    Apr 20, 2011. 12:22 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In an "open letter" to Intel (INTC) chief Paul Otellini, Nomura's Romit Shah says it's time for the chipmaker to boost its mobile-market position by licensing ARM Holdings' (ARMH) design and look at buying Texas Instruments' (TXN) OMAP mobile line. He also cites several reasons a $20B buyback "makes sense."  [View news story]
    Licensing ARM designs is a DUMB idea. Intel and AMD need to continue to push the x86. That's their differentiation and there are plenty of opportunities there. Shah is too quick to extrapolate the future by looking at the ARM core today. Recent chips from AMD and Intel are closing the gap with ARM on the power efficiency front while being miles ahead performance-wise.

    I do agree with him on using the cash horde to buy-back stock and permanently retire it (rather than hand it out to directors and management). Intel is NOTORIOUS for wasting money on acquisitions that it poorly integrates... Just like Cisco, by the way.
    Apr 18, 2011. 12:46 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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