Seeking Alpha

WiZlon

WiZlon
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View WiZlon's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Intel: An Ample Reward Awaits The Patient Investor [View article]
    Great article, even with the socks. I like that Intel is not sitting down: they are spending our money investing, and I believe in American technology (not our cost base, but our technology). I think INTC will do well for long term owners. It's not a trading stock, that's for sure, but to get paid to hold this and to sell some options against it is very fine by me.

    I think Intel could try harder to work with Google: I think the combination could put an end to iApple's dominance (although arguably, Apple seem to be helping that to happen even without Intel or google today). Great company. Buy and hold. Great article sir, thanks for sharing.
    Jan 23 11:32 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is Wrong With Intel? [View article]
    I won't keep it that long. I picked it because the extrinsic value went up by such a huge amount (greater than the stock decline, and it's OTM), so it will have to come back in as/when/(if) INTC recovers. If it fails to recover, I am getting 15.5% back on my cash during the interim.

    I have found that selling short-dated options rarely works for me: I quickly get called away or put stock and the "gain" is not all that great. Selling longer dated is something that's worked before for me on INTC, so I kinda feel like I know what I'm doing.

    Good luck to you in your trading.
    Jan 20 05:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is Wrong With Intel? [View article]
    Great article with some good points. Thanks for sharing. I like Intel on this pullback. I think the stock got over-hammered for FY12 performance.

    Sold some Jan 2015 $20 Put on Friday after the open as a very low-risk way of adding to my existing position (which I own at about the current trading price). The extrinsic value went UP more than the stock went DOWN. Pretty amazing response, and definitely over done. I feel lucky to have been able to sell them at such a high price. Worse case, I get to own 1,000 more shares at a net $16.9 ea (equivalent to a 5% dividend!). Best case, I keep $3 premium and I don't add to my current position. The dividend on this makes it a no-brainer for me: perhaps limited growth potential, and 4% to try.
    Jan 20 08:31 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Lockheed Martin: A Cheap 5% Yielder To Buy Now [View article]
    Defense spending is discretionary. I work in said industry. We are going to get hammered over the next 2-5 years. It's NOT the time to buy any defense stock, including LM. You might be able to ride thro' 2012, as orders will be "ok" (not great). But smart money will be out before 2012 ends. Don't be late. Sometimes, cash is OK!

    Good luck either way. :)
    Dec 21 11:39 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ETY: A Good Equity Covered Call Fund for a Taxable Account [View article]
    Thanks for the reply - much clearer now. I learned something new today, so I appreciate the insights.

    Thanks.

    Andrew
    May 3 08:15 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • ETY: A Good Equity Covered Call Fund for a Taxable Account [View article]
    I don't get all the excitement. This high yielding fund comes at the expense of decreased intrinsic value. It has underperformed the S&P by a significant margin, even allowing for dividend reinvestment. The recent drop in yield is hardly a positive sign to me.

    Maybe I am missing something, but with capital preservation as a goal, I wouldn't touch this with a barge pole. Same goes with ETW too - sub-par performance and a decreasing yield.

    No disrespect intended. Regards,

    Andrew
    Apr 30 09:14 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is the VIX Telling You to Do Now? [View article]
    The most simple ideas are always the best. I like the idea of using VIX to raise cash, as it helps take the emotions out of the investing process.

    A good article, thanks and Happy new Year to you.
    Dec 29 03:25 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 5 Stock, Commodity, Forex, Key Market Drivers for the Week Ahead: September 13 - 17, 2010 [View article]
    Cliff:

    Presumably, at such high interest rates, Greece will be relying solely on the ECB to buy their debt for the foreseeable auctions. If I understand correctly, this should work because the EZ has a $t or so bail-out package they agreed earlier this year for such a purpose.

    I have a couple of questions for you and your readers:
    1. How will the Euro respond to that - is effectively being diluted by such a debt repurchase program, and thus will it fall relative to the dollar?

    2. How long do you think Germany in particular, but really any non-PIIGS nation will sit back and allow this to happen; how much will they let the ECB spend. So what breaks first: Germany's resolve or the $t piggy-bank?

    Thanks for the posting and sharing your views again.

    Andrew
    Sep 12 10:47 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Yet another week of net cash outflows from domestic equity funds - $7.6B in the week ended Sept. 1, the Investment Company Institute reports. That was up from $4.3B the previous week and the biggest outflow since May.  [View news story]
    How does the market rally when there's a net selling of equities of this magnitude?
    Sep 9 03:30 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is a Big Decline in Equities Ahead? [View article]
    Your analysis appears sound, much like others I've seen on the subject.

    See also this article:-

    seekingalpha.com/artic...

    Interesting reading too. It's puzzling how we have not had a correction that is so evidently called for. One of the potential explanations given is quite disturbing, if true.

    GL
    Aug 3 07:38 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • August 2nd – 6th Quick Review/Preview: Stocks, Commodities, Forex [View instapost]
    Hey Cliff:

    Great post, as ever. Your articles and posts are on my "must-read" list every day. Thanks for helping us to figure out the information.

    Andrew
    Aug 1 12:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Upbeat Analysts Contrarian Indicators or Right This Time? [View article]
    It's hardly a convincing argument to say that analysts are now more strongly bullish, given their dreadful track record.

    I would agree that stock valuations are attractive today, but given the sovereign debt issues that are mounting up across the globe, and that no government has the stomach to truly address the underlying issues (i.e. spending more than they can afford), I believe that our economies go south more before they go north. Equities willnot be protected from this; indeed, they will continue to feel the effects first.

    Today is not a good day to be buying anyting except protection.
    Jun 1 08:14 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The World According to Gold [View article]
    What's the relationship between the price of the S&P 500, say 10-20 years ago versus gold, and where we stand today? Has gold appreciated so much more than the S&P (with all it's ups and downs)?

    Sure, GOLD hits new highs during some of the sovereign crises (like now, with the Euro), but it's hardly earth shattering. It may go higher, but so may other commodities (Palladium?)

    Sorry, but I just don't get such enthusiasm. Gold is a good investment at times, but it's not the be-all and end-all that some proclaim. It's expensive now. It has some upside, but you can do as well with good equities.

    Now if you plan to switch currency, maybe that's a different proposition. But until the U.S. changes from $ to GBP (for example), I see no significant benefit to buying gold today.

    Respectfully,

    WiZ
    May 14 08:51 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With Asian markets set to open, the EU is scrambling against a self-imposed deadline to roll out a coordinated defense plan for the euro that reportedly comes to €560B total ($724B). Updated 8:22 p.m.: Live press conference has begun, a few hours late. Reuters reports a €500B package, a mix of loans and loan guarantees. The Nikkei opened flat to slightly higher (+0.3%) before news began to break. Euro +1% against the dollar.  [View news story]
    Yeah good point. At least I can use it to buy US goods without too much fear in the short term. If I were smart, I'd figure out of gold was a buy here or not. But alas, as gold appraches an all time high, I'm not prepared to go there either.
    May 9 08:46 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • With Asian markets set to open, the EU is scrambling against a self-imposed deadline to roll out a coordinated defense plan for the euro that reportedly comes to €560B total ($724B). Updated 8:22 p.m.: Live press conference has begun, a few hours late. Reuters reports a €500B package, a mix of loans and loan guarantees. The Nikkei opened flat to slightly higher (+0.3%) before news began to break. Euro +1% against the dollar.  [View news story]
    The loans are one thing, but it's the so-called austerity measures that make or break this. Europe has spent more than it can afford (plain and yet so simple), but are the people of Greece, Portugal and Spain prepared to live to a much lower standard for years in order to pay for the debt they have built up? Especially when default (and withdrawal from the Euro) is seen as less painful (backout, re-instate local currency, print money, devalue, high inflation - back to the "good old days"). This new short-term lending / borrowing between Euro nations provides decent liquidity to a degree, but does not fix the fundamental problem. Indeed, all they have done is raise the stakes: instead of pushing for just one nation to default, the markets might now push for several of the PIIGS at once. Who has the most money now? The markets that have bet against Greece only so far or the Euro supporters? Does Germany, France and few other of the more-stable countries have the stomach and political strength for a $500bn bet against the market to save some irresponsible PIIGS from failing? I think not. It will be interesting to watch. The money they have has bought some time, so maybe we get a melt up next week, but if the markets increase the pressure, it could clearly go down again (because ultimately it NEEDS to). I am not smart enough to make that call on tomorrow's action. Long term though, I have no doubt: the Euro scene as we see it today is broken and for good. A new one emerges by end 2012 latest. Smaller, and more responsible.

    Positions: cash only
    May 9 08:01 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
16 Comments
24 Likes