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Argyll

Argyll
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  • American Realty Capital Properties: A Good Value That Is Gaining Strength [View article]
    ARCP doesn't own Red Lobster. Just the real estate. ARCP doesn't own FedEx, Walmart, Walgreens, Home Depot or other stores on its properties, either.
    Aug 22 03:17 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Frothy Market Has Nothing To Do With Investing In Individual Stocks [View article]
    The Dow Jones recovery figures to which you are referring are misleading:

    Deflation: By 1936, the Consumer Price Index was 18% lower than it was when the market crashed in 1929. So the amount of purchasing power investors gained in the recovery when the market turned up by, say, a dollar was greater than the amount of purchasing power they lost for each dollar of declines in the preceding bear market. If you had $100 in 1929 and $82 in 1936, you still had the same purchasing power. You really lost nothing. It was a deflationary period. The $18 fluctuation was meaningless. Your purchasing power is identical.

    Dividends: When the market bottomed in 1932, the dividend yield of the overall market was almost 14%, according to Yale Professor Robert Shiller’s data. Those payouts aren’t included in the Dow’s price levels. Taking it one step further, looking at Jeremy Siegel’s research, if you had been reinvesting your dividends, you could have broken even in purchasing power in a few years after the bottom.

    The Dow Is Different Than the Market: While it often gives a good idea of the broader market’s returns, the Dow is made up of a small number of stocks and often doesn’t include certain stocks that are very relevant to average investors. IBM — a very popular and successful stock in the post-Depression era — was dropped from the Dow in 1939, Hulbert notes, so the Dow didn’t benefit from its big 1940s gains, even though many investors did .

    http://bit.ly/1ljMqA4

    http://bit.ly/1ljMqA7

    http://nyti.ms/1qNhZFZ;
    Aug 1 01:08 PM | 10 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Frothy Market Has Nothing To Do With Investing In Individual Stocks [View article]
    Stocks have gone up when there was no Quantitative Easing, say for 200 years or so (1800-2008).
    Aug 1 06:57 AM | 20 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Thursday's Sell-Off Matters [View article]
    It could be just the summer market decline that happens every summer.
    Jul 31 06:49 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • No, I Didn't Sell Everything, But I'm Getting Cautious [View article]
    Yes, I'm aware that tight oil has a rapid decline curve. However, for at least the next five or ten years, there appears to be enough oil out there to continue high production. It is vastly boosting a number of state economies and benefiting the US economy as a whole. At the same time there is vast new installation of wind turbines, even in North Dakota, and solar installations which generally mean that the money for this energy circulates locally in the county, state, and country rather than to distant corporations or countries. Yes, some of it goes to distant corporations, but the land royalties and taxes go to local people and jurisdictions.

    I see the growth of renewables like wind and solar as being vastly more important, because they are not constrained by fuel supply. The wind and sunshine will not run out nor require new drilling and installations.
    Jul 29 01:59 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • No, I Didn't Sell Everything, But I'm Getting Cautious [View article]
    In all the bearish talk it seems pundits and commentators are ignoring an important issue. That is the energy outlook. The US is producing a lot more oil and gas and it is predicted to grow for several years. At the same time the cost of renewables has dropped drastically and solar and wind energy are rapidly growing. These provide a major boost to the economy.
    Jul 29 12:54 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • No, I Didn't Sell Everything, But I'm Getting Cautious [View article]
    I'm almost fully invested, mostly in eREITs and BDCs. Half pay monthly dividends, and I reinvest all of them. Should there be a correction/recession the companies would continue to pay dividends and I would continue to buy them through reinvestment at the lower price. 60% of these companies went through the Great Recession -- the worst case was one company that dropped about 70% in value but continued to pay dividends and has since fully recovered its price. The others also dropped in value, mostly 30-40% but continued to pay dividends and have since recovered. This may seem like a dangerous strategy, but if one can wait things out, it's easier than buying and selling, paying commissions, generating taxable events, and gambling you'll be in or out of the market at the right time.
    Jul 29 12:14 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Implosion Is Near: Signs Of The Bubble's Last Days [View article]
    Stockman. Is that a real name? I think he made it up.
    Jul 27 12:26 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Amazon.com 'Come To Jesus' Earnings Report [View article]
    The services Amazon provides are very valuable.
    Jul 25 10:08 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Residential PV Solar More Trouble Than It's Worth? [View article]
    Rooftop solar power is making coal obsolete in Australia

    http://yhoo.it/1lUQ6as

    More than a million Australians have already installed rooftop panels, causing demand for electricity supplied by traditional utilities to plunge. According to analysis from UBS, demand for electricity in Australia has dropped by 13% over the past four years.
    Jul 9 05:03 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Residential PV Solar More Trouble Than It's Worth? [View article]
    So when the grid has a problem with electricity coming into it, it doesn't matter whether it's solar power or not, it matters that it's the grid's problem. The grid has to deal with it. Nothing should be blamed on solar power. Is that what John is saying?

    That would negate his entire article.
    Jul 4 11:11 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Residential PV Solar More Trouble Than It's Worth? [View article]
    Solar power may aggravate conditions like grid instability, just like power surges may aggravate conditions; but the suggestion that society inflicted the underlying grid conditions on the grid is unadulterated nonsense.

    Believe it or not, most energy grids are flawed, limited or disabled in one way or another and it is the responsibility of each energy grid to respond appropriately to its own disability without blaming somebody else.

    A particular condition, weakness or susceptibility to environmental conditions may not be the electrical grid's fault but it is most definitely the grid's problem.
    Jul 4 09:43 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Residential PV Solar More Trouble Than It's Worth? [View article]
    John, why do you post such incredibly stupid things? Illness is the own person's fault? So, if you get ill it's 100% your fault? Any family member of yours is ill and it's 100% their fault and it has nothing to do with anything in the environment?

    Claiming that air pollution has no effect on health is one of the silliest things I've ever heard. Even the fossil fuel companies don't say that.
    Jul 4 09:37 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Just How Risky Is High-Yield Dividend Investing? [View article]
    Is there any kind of study of high-yield vs. medium yield or low yield dividend stocks?
    Jul 4 06:42 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Just How Risky Is High-Yield Dividend Investing? [View article]
    "Volatility is not risk. " Well, not directly, but it scares some investors. Remaining invested in any high dividend play that does not fail is highly successful most of the time.
    Jul 3 03:48 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
762 Comments
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