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  • It's been a nice rally, Treasurys, but it's time to bet against the government, Anthony Mirhaydari says. It's not just the usual suspects (ending QE, inflation pressure, the debt ceiling), but currency effects from a building euro - itself backed by ECB rate hikes - that will weigh on U.S. government bonds.   [View news story]
    I agree. Do they have the control to do that ?? When QE 2 ends there will be one less major buyer. They were buying to keep rates low using some kind of formula to step in when rates climed too high.
    What will stop the rates from climbing ?? It will be in everyone elses interest for them to rise ??
    Jun 11, 2011. 03:42 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Remember when the White House promised to roll back regulatory burdens on the private sector? Facts speak louder than words: Since March 2010, federal regulatory agency employment has jumped more than 5%, while private jobs have grown just 1.5%. Maybe all the regulatory hires are for folks to cut red tape?   [View news story]
    Agreed. I have dealt with the EPA,State regulators, and county regulators for years, relating to timber removal. They have a worthy purpose. No one in their right mind, wants dirty water,air, etc... BUT
    : ) do a little history over the last 30 years relating to the logging of the national forest system. Reagan was accused of raping the forest.
    The USFS was a revenue producer. Now, timber sales are rare and many are the result of bugs,storms,wildfire - salvage sells. Right or wrong, they have been turned into national parks. The national forests were created to produce lumber for the country.
    Go to California and start the permitting process for a non-salvage
    timber harvest and get back with me in a couple of years.

    IMO, I blame lawyers/politicians/lo... The more complex the regulation, the more $ the l/p/l put in their pockets.
    The new laws/regulation coming out of DC these days are hardhitting. "Not all regulation is bad." Not all regulation is good.
    Once, its ingrained into the system - its unkillable.
    Jun 10, 2011. 07:11 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Massey Energy (ANR) releases its 102-page report on last year's mine explosion that killed 29 workers, and it blames a natural gas surge, not coal dust - contradicting federal regulators and an independent probe. The upshot is more tension with regulators, and complications in lawsuits filed by miners' families; Massey wrapped its $7.1B merger with Alpha Natural Resources on Wednesday.   [View news story]
    Somebody is lying ??
    Jun 3, 2011. 12:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • QE3? Better hope so, says the new consensus among market pros. "There is one bet right now: Bernanke will bail out the world," one says. “If that does not happen, then no investment will be safe."   [View news story]
    And they will be against us
    Jun 1, 2011. 06:44 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Inflation? Just look at the deflation all around you - cars, clothes, home energy, hotel stays, furniture and appliances, electronic gadgets of all kinds. "There's no grand conspiracy to keep the headline number down," Matt Busigin writes.   [View news story]
    Its both. The higher cost of energy will find its way to drive the cost
    of everything higher. Inventories that dont move as anticipated get
    discounted quickly. That wont happen a second time. The cost to produce energy and the raw materials needed for manufacturing will continue to rise. Right or wrong, the Greens, EPA, etc are making
    it very restrictive to add this type of capacity.
    May 20, 2011. 06:26 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The wisdom of crowds - remarkably accurate when members arrive at opinions on their own - disappears when folks know what others are thinking. “The truth becomes less central if social influence is allowed,” write 2 researchers, quickly explaining how bubbles form.   [View news story]
    The NEA said too many people were getting their feeeelings hurt. Feeeeling redistribution
    May 17, 2011. 08:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • America's greatest threat is not the deficit or terrorism or China - it is "impotent leadership... the lack of vision... the selling out to the highest bidder in Washington," Barry Ritholtz writes. The U.S. government "has become a giant grift, populated by Jezebels and strumpets," guided only by the "endless stream of corporate giveaways, tax loopholes and bailouts."   [View news story]
    Term limits would be a good start.
    May 14, 2011. 07:58 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • America's greatest threat is not the deficit or terrorism or China - it is "impotent leadership... the lack of vision... the selling out to the highest bidder in Washington," Barry Ritholtz writes. The U.S. government "has become a giant grift, populated by Jezebels and strumpets," guided only by the "endless stream of corporate giveaways, tax loopholes and bailouts."   [View news story]
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. ... God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion; what country can preserve its liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms." -- Thomas Jefferson to William Stephens Smith, 1787
    May 14, 2011. 01:33 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • America's greatest threat is not the deficit or terrorism or China - it is "impotent leadership... the lack of vision... the selling out to the highest bidder in Washington," Barry Ritholtz writes. The U.S. government "has become a giant grift, populated by Jezebels and strumpets," guided only by the "endless stream of corporate giveaways, tax loopholes and bailouts."   [View news story]
    And yet it continues at an accelerating rate. The catalyst to change
    direction wont be pretty.
    May 13, 2011. 05:43 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Worry over U.S. budget deficits was pervasive at the Skybridge conference, but equally consistent was the notion that "right now, we're OK." Add Leon Cooperman to those able to compartmentalize: "We're heading for a crisis. I just don't know when. [But until then] equities are the best value in a bad neighborhood" - specifically, GM, ETFC, RIG, TEVA, CVS.   [View news story]
    "right now, we're OK" How many times have we heard that ??
    It will come like a thief in the night
    May 12, 2011. 06:19 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • With foreclosures taking an average of 900 days to wind their way through the NY court system, it will take 7 years to clear the backlog, according to RealtyTrac. While the slow process keeps prices from falling as fast as in other states, it only promises to draw the downturn out even further.   [View news story]
    Man, dont let the cat out of the bag !!! I already can envision the internet pop-ups and billboads : )
    May 12, 2011. 06:15 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "Using the debt limit as a bargaining chip is quite risky," Bernanke warns Senators, "at minimum" leading to "an increase in interest rates, which would actually worsen our deficit and would hurt all borrowers in the economy." But a GAO report affirming the Treasury's right to prioritize interest payments over domestic spending may embolden use of the tactic.   [View news story]
    " would hurt all borrowers in the economy." As opposed to hurting
    all savers ??
    May 12, 2011. 03:53 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The folks who warn of the catastrophe of a sovereign default are the bankers and fund managers who stand to lose a lot of money. Countries fail to pay off their debt all the time, says Matthew Lynn, and Greece should get on with it. Announce a 50% haircut, suspension of interest payments, and move along.   [View news story]
    I agree, that would be the quickest way for a sovereign to get well. Their future ability to raise money through bonds would be restrained and they would be forced to reduce spending to match revenue. I think the problem is that other sovereigns and the sovereign dependents are the ones who will get the shortest haircut !!
    Apr 29, 2011. 02:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Fed's latest economic projections - real GDP growth: 3.1-3.3% in 2011 vs. prior projection of 3.4-3.9%, 3.5-4.2% in 2012 vs. 3.5-4.4% prior, 3.5-4.3% in 2013 vs. 3.7-4.6% prior. PCE inflation: 2.1-2.8% in 2011 vs. 1.3-1.7% prior, 1.2-2% in 2012 vs. 1-1.9% prior, 1.4-2% in 2013 vs. 1.2-2% prior.   [View news story]
    Kinda makes predictions worthless
    Apr 27, 2011. 04:03 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Jeremy Grantham's latest essay, an apocalyptic description of a planet running out of resources, is either a wake-up call or the mother of all sell signals. One hundred years of commodity price declines have been wiped out since 2002, says Grantham, contending a similar length uptrend is now in place.   [View news story]
    Ooops, I stand corrected, +- 80 million/yr

    Globally, the growth rate of the human population has been declining since peaking in 1962 and 1963 at 2.20% per annum. In 2009, the estimated annual growth rate was 1.1%.[3] The CIA World Factbook gives the world annual birthrate, mortality rate, and growth rate as 1.915%, 0.812%, and 1.092% respectively[4] The last one hundred years have seen a rapid increase in population due to medical advances and massive increase in agricultural productivity[5] made possible by the Green Revolution.[6][7][8]

    The actual annual growth in the number of humans fell from its peak of 88.0 million in 1989, to a low of 73.9 million in 2003, after which it rose again to 75.2 million in 2006. Since then, annual growth has declined. In 2009, the human population increased by 74.6 million, and it is projected to fall steadily to about 41 million per annum in 2050, at which time the population will have increased to about 9.2 billion
    Apr 25, 2011. 10:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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