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  • IBM: A Disaster In The Making [View article]
    R0173,

    Speaking as a person whose successfully done major deployments of Oracle ERPs, I didn't ignore your comment. Your comment made no sense. Organizations deploying on their own quickly learn they must amass the subject matter expertise in a major ERP in order to be successful. The time and cost of building/acquiring that expertise is significant. It pays to outsource to those who already have it.

    IT is NOT among the core competencies of the entire financial services segment. Outsourcing in this area is of long standing, well established, and increasing.
    May 23, 2013. 10:24 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Tim Cook's Improbable Victory In Washington [View article]
    Sacathanas,

    No offense taken. However, as for "simple...."

    A pure flat tax with no deductions would give Congress a greatly diminished role. Remember, Representatives and Senators cannot be re-elected without ongoing substantial financial support. Since the SCOTUS gave corporations personhood and the ability to fund political discourse, our elected representatives trade access to power for money. It's known as the "Iron Triangle" in politics.

    Not so simple. The late Jack Kemp pushed for a flat tax decades ago. No success since. Wonder why?
    May 22, 2013. 02:06 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Tim Cook's Improbable Victory In Washington [View article]
    Sacathansas,

    That was my point. The current tax system is hopeless. Make all the changes you want, you get a similar outcome--just a new set of winners and losers.

    Flat tax? Yes.
    May 22, 2013. 01:17 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Tim Cook's Improbable Victory In Washington [View article]
    Apple hasn't broken any laws and is not fleeing prosecution of the IRS. What they have done is to avail themselves of the tax policies in the U.S. and abroad. Now that outcome may be...displeasing...to the U.S. Congress, but Congress devised and passed those same tax laws and for decades they have done nothing to change the law to prohibit the practices of Apple and others.

    Making good tax policy is not an easy task in a democracy, especially when special interests pursue and often prevail in securing preferential treatment. Any change in tax policy will present us with new winners and losers, and keep an army of tax specialists, lawyers, and lobbyists employed. The losers will seek to regain advantage. The winners will find their practices in the Congressional spotlight, and the topic will once again be...displeasing to the U.S. Congress.
    May 22, 2013. 10:48 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • IBM: A Disaster In The Making [View article]
    R0173,

    "Leased lines" still exist today. Few end-user firms "own" their own links to carrier hotels. Phone lines? Telecomm is so much more complex today that telephony runs on top as a "gimme."

    F100 firms learned a long time ago to invest in their core competencies and outsource the others. Outside of the big IT firms, few of the F100 have building and running data centers as their core competencies. Fewer still excel at building scalable infrastructure.

    All of the interesting, and highly remunerative, advances in software defined networking, data center design and operation, are coming from the big cloud providers, because this IS their business.
    May 22, 2013. 10:39 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • IBM: A Disaster In The Making [View article]
    R0713,

    The only thing that cloud computing shares in common with the much older service bureaus is this: Companies use a computing infrastructure, and possibly services, that are not hosted "locally" on their owned/leased IT investment.

    The difference between the cloud and the service bureau models are numerous. God (or the Devil, depending on your POV) is in the details.

    Yes, IBM did abandon the Service Bureau model, because it wasn't as remunerative as its competing lines of business. IBM will compete in the cloud, but with high value services based on their IPR and those things they do best.
    May 21, 2013. 09:45 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • IBM: A Disaster In The Making [View article]
    JS,

    As a very long time Dell client, let me note the following points:

    [1] Dell has started, marketed for a short time, and then withdrawn from market numerous storage products (i.e., NAS and SAN) over the years. What is the exact opposite of "continuity?"

    [2] Dell's sales force has shrunk dramatically during the past few years. No one sales person can effectively represent their entire product line.

    [3] If you know your Dell representative today (see [2]), you may not tomorrow. As an alternative, tomorrow you may be sharing your sales representative with a lot more Dell customers. Don't expect quality time.

    [4] Dell's not an obvious, effective user of cloud technologies. How do you sell something you don't embrace in your own organization?
    May 20, 2013. 04:37 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nokia's Asha 501 Proves The Company Still Is A Formidable Competitor [View article]
    DC,

    Do the majority of cell phone purchasers know, or even care, about the phone's underlying OS? Clearly some do, but do the majority of buyers?

    Don't most buyers base their purchase on whether they like the device, if it's available on their preferred carrier network, it's a price they can afford (plan and phone, or phone alone), and the phone is readily available for purchase in their area?
    May 20, 2013. 01:59 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nokia (NOK +2.7%) officially unveils the Lumia 928. It has a 4.5," 1280x768, OLED display (many high-end Android phones are now at 1080p), a 1.5GHz. dual-core Qualcomm (QCOM) Snapdragon processor, an 8.7MP camera with optical image stabilization and a xenon flash, and high-amp mics for audio recording. The specs are generally in-line with those mentioned in rumors. Verizon will start selling the 928 on May 16 for a subsidized $100 (with a rebate). Separately, Nokia announces the Lumia 620 (3.8" display) will be sold by AT&T's new Aio Wireless prepaid brand. [View news story]
    Yes.
    May 18, 2013. 07:54 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nokia (NOK +2.7%) officially unveils the Lumia 928. It has a 4.5," 1280x768, OLED display (many high-end Android phones are now at 1080p), a 1.5GHz. dual-core Qualcomm (QCOM) Snapdragon processor, an 8.7MP camera with optical image stabilization and a xenon flash, and high-amp mics for audio recording. The specs are generally in-line with those mentioned in rumors. Verizon will start selling the 928 on May 16 for a subsidized $100 (with a rebate). Separately, Nokia announces the Lumia 620 (3.8" display) will be sold by AT&T's new Aio Wireless prepaid brand. [View news story]
    LRatt,

    Looking for quality, knowledgeable service at a phone store is like expecting to fine honesty at a (used) car dealership. Prepare to be disappointed.

    Sales people sell what they know, what they have in stock, and what pays the best commission.
    May 17, 2013. 02:36 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Nokia's Asha 501 Proves The Company Still Is A Formidable Competitor [View article]
    DC,

    In the history of technology firms, there have been a substantial number of acquisitions where the buying firm paid top dollar to lockdown the asset only to learn later that it was overpriced. If you're going to start hanging CEOs who've made such mistakes, then the Wall Street will be lined with platforms and executioners.

    Come to think of it, that's not a bad idea. That would slow down M&A a bit, think?
    May 17, 2013. 02:33 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Panera Bread: A Simple Strategy Shift To Double Shares [View article]
    JA,

    Have to disagree. Knowing that franchisees outperform corporate stores is one thing. Not knowing why is...inexcusable. You can't run your business assuming what happens inside the store units is a "blackbox."

    Sorry, Dude. You missed the boat on this one.
    May 17, 2013. 02:29 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Panera Bread: A Simple Strategy Shift To Double Shares [View article]
    The only question I have concerns what happens following the corporate purchase of the franchise unit/store?

    Your analysis assumes that whatever explains why a franchised location outperforms a comparable (?) corporate location actually conveys with the purchase. So, the difference isn't entrepreneurial? The difference isn't the franchise owner?

    If that's the case, why aren't newly constructed corporate locations designed and built to represent the best of the franchise locations' attributes? Wouldn't that be a less expensive strategy than purchasing a store with a proven track record at a higher price?
    May 17, 2013. 11:19 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Nokia's Asha 501 Proves The Company Still Is A Formidable Competitor [View article]
    DC,

    Hey, I'll even give you a week. :-)

    Puff pieces don't influence key decision makers. Current mindshare, actual marketshare, and known performance do.

    Many years ago, CEOs were fond of saying, "No one ever got fired for buying from IBM." Until recently, they said similar things about CISCO, Dell, HP, and a number of others.

    Somehow, NSN has to gain that same sense of surety and safety to overcome the risk attendant in such large technology renovations. By the way, the Siemens (Nokia) crew caught a bad rap for being late on the Sprint network rehab. Being late in a high visibility, bet the company investment doesn't win accolades and new business. Just the opposite.
    May 17, 2013. 11:09 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sirius XM: Apple? Google? What? [View article]
    SF,

    Apple's (historic) strategy is to acquire smaller technology firms whose expertise can help convey "first mover" opportunity to Apple in emerging markets. They buy small firms for their technologies. They buy their firms to acquire design and engineering staff investment (or block competitors from gaining a similar advantage). Both convey in a short period of time what would otherwise take Apple quite longer to build on its own.

    Apple does not buy companies for their content. Apple does not buy companies for their clients. Apple has not purchased a company for its distribution system.
    May 17, 2013. 10:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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224 Comments
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