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  • Lentuo International, This $1.3 Stock Could Be Trading North Of $20/Share Next Year [View article]
    MCGF, thank you for the article.
    Are you concerned about the possibility of accounting irregularities that The Geo Team noted back in June, or have those been resolved?
    Nov 15, 2014. 11:00 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Stock To Watch: Arch Therapeutics, Inc. [View instapost]
    Thank you; it sounds interesting.
    However, there is this negative assessment:
    http://seekingalpha.co...
    What is your opinion on that?
    Nov 2, 2014. 02:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Global Warming "Science"; What Investors Need To Know, Don't Just Trust The "Experts" [View instapost]
    Consensus is not scientific proof. In fact, it is a logical fallacy. There have been many instances throughout history where the consensus of scientists was wrong. (For example, the consensus of doctors at one time was that washing one's hands before surgery was not necessary.) Scientific truth is not determined by a majority vote.

    There are also many qualified dissenting opinions. I think you if you do a little deeper research you will be surprised at the quality of the arguments of those dissenters.
    Jun 7, 2014. 02:44 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In Organics: Look Beyond Premium Grocers [View article]
    "..recent research has shown that vitamins and supplements have no real health benefits..."
    I would advise readers to be skeptical of this and do some due diligence before they eliminate their vitamins and other nutritional supplements.
    Apr 25, 2014. 01:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are These 3 Biotech Companies Still Worth A Gamble? [View article]
    Craig,
    Regarding PRAN, you said, "First, there was almost no difference between the placebo group and the 100mg group, taking credibility away from the positive result from the 250mg group."
    You statement implies that dose response must be linear. Do you have some supporting data for that assumption? I.e. why could it not be that a nonlinear threshold effect was in play with the higher dose?
    Thanks.
    Apr 14, 2014. 11:37 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    Occam, maybe a leak, although it has subsequently dropped significantly from the ~0.22 peak. I haven't read any significant hard news related to fundamentals, but will revisit if I do.
    Mar 15, 2014. 02:12 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Cel-Sci's Multikine - Potential 21st Century Superdrug [View article]
    Mr. Sacerdote,

    Thank you for the detailed response; I appreciate your insight. (I am a follower and have found your articles to be very informative.)

    I'm still intrigued by CVM, though, because of the (admittedly early and statistically-limited) success of their first anal warts study, which appeared to be quite effective (now undergoing a formal Navy study).

    Also, is it necessary to totally eliminate the cancer cells following the trial dosing? Wouldn't a repetitive dosing modality be fine, if it kept the cancer at bay? I.e. although, as you say, "Changes in the character of inflammatory cells in the tumor/tumor bed are not relevant clinically," absence of clinical proof does not necessarily mean that clinical benefit is completely absent, correct? Or am I misunderstanding something?

    I think the issue I struggle with is how much faith to place in the ability of statistical studies to predict future success. It would be interesting to read a meta-study of a clinical trials review (if one exists) that examines those cases where effective therapies were found by persistence, despite statistically insignificant success in early trials.
    Mar 14, 2014. 09:54 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Cel-Sci's Multikine - Potential 21st Century Superdrug [View article]
    Mr. Sacerdote,
    "...the scientific premise is so poorly supported..."
    Are you referring to theory, or prior clinical trials, or both? If trials, are you saying that the prior trial results are not statistically significant?
    Mar 14, 2014. 12:26 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    42itus1,

    You asserted "...the claim that Mr. Petersen has "implied large forthcoming orders from ePower and BMW." is completely unjustified and a false characterization."

    I provided quotes from the article to disprove your assertion.

    Now you seem to be concerned that I blamed Mr. Petersen for my investment choice. I didn't; I blamed myself. Here's what I said: "...I felt a bit embarrassed in that I had not done appropriate due diligence (i.e. I had allowed Petersen to "sell" me his thesis)."
    Mar 9, 2014. 02:39 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    42itus1,

    From "Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity"

    "Axion's CEO Tom Granville...also reaffirmed an earlier promise that Axion would make a substantial sales announcement before the next quarterly earnings call in mid-November [2013]."

    "...all of Axion's business relationships are suggesting that an implementation decision is imminent."

    Instead of "large" and "forthcoming" I guess I should have said "substantial" and "imminent"?
    Mar 9, 2014. 01:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    occam,

    I would revisit if I saw some firm and substantial sales booked by Axion.
    I initially took a position in Axion based on the Petersen article that implied large forthcoming orders from ePower and BMW. Large orders, particularly from BMW, would substantially derisk the investment. When I found out that those orders were not forthcoming I felt a bit embarrassed in that I had not done appropriate due diligence (i.e. I had allowed Petersen to "sell" me his thesis), and then did additional research and found other technology and competition concerns that I have mentioned earlier here and also in the Concentrator.
    Mar 9, 2014. 11:53 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    AlbertinBermuda,

    Not quite sure I understand the question, but a little research will show the competitors; e.g. CSIRO, http://bit.ly/1kCObvZ.
    Mar 7, 2014. 01:10 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    aseflong,

    Axion does not have a monopoly on PbC formulations; there is competition in that space. There are also alternate system arrangements that can pose competition, as I mentioned earlier.

    Here's a link that you might find helpful:
    "Binder-free Nanoporous Carbon Composite(NCC) Electrode Technology"
    by Dr. Jing Wang
    http://bit.ly/P8Z1wJ

    An excerpt:
    "For recent developments however in Australia (CSIRO, UltraBattery), the US (Axion Power International), and several Russian companies have led to hybrid developments using carbon electrodes either in parallel with the lead-oxide anode or as a replacement of the lead-oxide anode. CSIRO licensed the technology to East Penn, which is a leading lead acid battery company in US."
    Mar 7, 2014. 11:54 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    aseflong,

    "Your risk is only $0.13."

    Penny stocks are fine, I understand the payoff potential, but a total $ investment as a % of portfolio in a given stock is really independent of the share price.

    "...your reward if PbC gains substantial sales could be $10+"

    The "if" in the above statement is where I am not convinced. There are other investment options where, in my opinion, the "if" is much more probable. It's just a probability assessment though, and I hope your investment turns out well.
    Mar 6, 2014. 08:56 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity [View article]
    Mr. Prefect,

    I have an engineering background, and would like to try to answer to some extent your very legitimate questions concerning Axion battery performance and tradeoffs.

    I originally invested in Axion, based on the above article ("Axion Power: An Extraordinary Nano-Cap Opportunity"). I subsequently even made favorable comments on the Axion Power Concentrator. No one took to me task for my favorable comments.

    However, upon doing additional research, I became concerned that the Axion business dependency on ePower sales was too far into the future, plus has some dubious technical assumptions. Since this thesis of the article was suddenly weak, I did some more research, attempting to independently verify the basic question you have asked: what is the advantage of the Axion PbC battery compared to other alternatives? My determination was that the risk outweighed the reward, so I sold my holdings. I posted this conclusion on the Concentrator and was ridiculed, called a troll, etc. by Petersen and others. (A few mature folks there posted respectful responses to my opinion.)

    In addition to the weakness in the ePower thesis, I have serious concerns about the Axion battery approach. Yes, it does have the advantage of being an integrated version of a lead acid battery with a supercapacitor, which does have technical advantages, particularly with regard to higher frequency start-stop applications. But it also appears to have some significant disadvantages (not even considering lithium ion):

    1. Larger & heavier & costlier than an equivalent KWh lead acid battery; i.e. not a drop-in replacement. AND...

    2. Since not drop-in, why not use an advanced lead acid in parallel with a supercap? Tradeoff is total cost and form factor; not clear which is best depending on application. However since Axion has yet to book substantial sales, it could be that the cost and form factor favor the lead acid + supercap approach. Or perhaps a lithium battery plus supercap.

    3. Or why even use an extra battery at all; why not just use a supercap (also called ultracap) with the standard vehicle lead acid battery?

    "Ultracapacitors in micro-and mild hybrids with lead-acid
    batteries: Simulations and laboratory and in-vehicle testing"

    http://bit.ly/1cAfb75

    4. Or even compressed air?

    "The car that runs on AIR: Peugot reveals plans for hybrid set to hit the streets next year"

    http://dailym.ai/1cAfb77

    In other words, the technology moat is not deep; competitive technology is rapidly advancing. ePower may even decide to use lead acid with supercaps, for example, instead of Axion. I could of course be incorrect, but there is nothing significant on the Axion web site that reassures me; i.e. no white papers or comparative studies; nothing other than general qualitative data. Generally one would expect to see a table of specific Axion product features/specifications versus those of competing technologies. There is no such table.

    I wish Axion investors well, but as I mentioned before, based on available data this investment no longer meets my risk/reward criteria.

    p.s. Based on past experience I may receive some insulting replies from Axion longs, which I will ignore, as well as general hazy talking points. I will respond to any respectful and substantive questions. I'm always happy to change my mind, based on substance.
    Mar 4, 2014. 07:36 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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