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todd.kaime

todd.kaime
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  • Apple's Shares Will Go Nowhere [View article]
    Exactly what I wanted to say. Beat me to it.

    I might add that even though it's a tiny slice of the market, in aviation iPads have replaced the bulky (think 20 lbs) of aviation charts for pilots that have been around since the inception of aviation. Multiply this by every other little niche in every other market and you can see this is a game changer.

    To the victor go the spoils of war! For this reason I am long AAPL.
    Sep 16, 2011. 02:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Apple Doesn't Get Any Love From Wall Street [View article]
    The investors who shy away from AAPL because of the price per share deserve what they get.
    Sep 15, 2011. 07:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The details are coming in on how Pres. Obama plans to pay for his $447B jobs plan: ending tax breaks for energy companies, people making more than $200,000/year, and private-equity funds. These are familiar talking points, and a plan relying on tax increases and no spending cuts likely gives Republicans the ammunition to thwart Obama yet again.  [View news story]
    Because it is. But don't let us stop you from sending all of your money to the Treasury to be spent how they see fit. Surely you can see that the government will provide for your every need. So go ahead, send it in. In fact, there's a way to fix the tax code: Line 1 -- "How much did you earn?", Line 2 -- "Write a check to the IRS for the amount in line one."
    Sep 13, 2011. 01:04 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Apple Doesn't Get Any Love From Wall Street [View article]
    This is an excellent article by its self. You should submit this as a stand-alone article. You seem to know what you're talking about.
    Sep 13, 2011. 11:50 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The details are coming in on how Pres. Obama plans to pay for his $447B jobs plan: ending tax breaks for energy companies, people making more than $200,000/year, and private-equity funds. These are familiar talking points, and a plan relying on tax increases and no spending cuts likely gives Republicans the ammunition to thwart Obama yet again.  [View news story]
    Wouldn't direct govt grants be "social engineering" too? Why couldn't I abuse govt grants?

    Provision in the tax code can also be sunsetted. Nothing makes it permanent that isn't in the law.

    I also have trouble with the idea that "tax breaks are just spending in disguise." The net effect of money flow might be the same but letting someone decide how to allocate their money as opposed to letting the govt decide - I fall on the side of private enterprise. Otherwise it's a social experiment. And we all know how socialism ends - when we run out of other people's money to spend.
    Sep 12, 2011. 07:51 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Are Apple Investors Being Shortchanged? [View article]
    Yeah... what they said!
    Sep 12, 2011. 07:07 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Research In Motion's Earnings Release Thursday Could Impact Tech Stocks [View article]
    I don't think RIMM will be that indicative of the broader tech industry. They are having trouble unique to themselves. If the quarter is good, good for them. But I doubt that is the case and it won't mean other tech will go down with them.

    Disclosure: I am long AAPL
    Sep 12, 2011. 12:38 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • 5 High Tech Stocks To Avoid [View article]
    I appreciate your report. You tell us how you're thinking towards AAPL and that is why it is not already at $500. You are not alone. However, I think it is a good stock for at least the short term (1 to 2 years) and then some of what you say about it may come to pass. I have trouble reconciling what you say about Apple's competition on one hand and then that competition can't execute on the other. Google's inability to mesh cultures will strengthen Apple.
    Sep 9, 2011. 11:37 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Whether Apple Should Do a Secondary Offering to Raise Cash [View article]
    Although it is difficult to find a company that's increased it's value to shareholders by doing a buyback because it's hard to quantify doesn't mean it's not the right thing to do. Remember buybacks are tax free while dividends are taxable to shareholders. Plus, dividends imply "something" about the company -- that it is becoming old and stodgy, among other things, if it can pay a dividend.

    Apple has enjoyed this cash "problem" for what, less than 5 years? It's not a situation that they are used to dealing with nor is it a situation that demands their attention immediately.
    Aug 17, 2011. 07:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Whether Apple Should Do a Secondary Offering to Raise Cash [View article]
    Thank you for an insightful analysis. I get it.

    Public companies should not collect assets (cash included) simply to be collecting. The assets they have should be sufficiently utilized in the due course of running a business. If you had an extra building or land lying around would you not sell it straight away rather than speculate as to timing the market to sell at the "best" price? Same with cash.

    Having said that, though, I wonder how much AAPL cash is expatriate? And that bringing it back to distribute to shareholders might be a significant loss to tax and currency translation. Even though currency translation is factored into the value reported it remains a merely unrealized gain/loss. Repatriating that cash could trigger a realized loss.
    Aug 17, 2011. 07:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • If a debt deal comes in the next three days, you'll probably be tempted to join a relief rally in equities. Don't buy it, says James Saft: Weakness in areas like housing and consumer spending isn't going anywhere, and the trend toward U.S. austerity likely won't change until "after the beginning of the recession it will help to cause."  [View news story]
    Others have said it: "multinationals." There's more to stocks than meets the American eye.
    Jul 30, 2011. 09:56 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple Is Getting Comfy With Its Cash [View article]
    So your theory is cash is the only thing that generates cash and at an accelerating rate? If that's true then why would a company, after having accumulated enough "seed" cash, produce any more product? Or, without diminishing the value of the enterprise, use some of that cash to buy back shares? Cash will have gone away but the business remains and will continue to generate profits and more cash.

    I don't think there is any "law" for what we see in the cash balance except for what we see in the entire balance sheet. Without the benefit of any real numbers I would speculate that retained earnings have also gone exponential. Is there a law for that too, other than simply an excellent performance?
    Jul 27, 2011. 03:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What Investors Should Know About Apple but Often Don't [View article]
    I was waiting for the part that I didn't know about.
    Jul 27, 2011. 01:27 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • An Investment in Apple Is Too Risky for Me [View article]
    I have yet to purchase an apple product (since the Mac in 1985) but I keep looking and comparing them to their competitors. The products that are meant to be competition is simply a shadow of what I see in Apple. The Google phones are good, don't get me wrong. But they are not an iphone. The tablets are the same. Apple simply works and works extremely well.

    I have to ask about your decision not to invest in AAPL - would you be more comfortable if the share price was $40 instead of $400? Why invest in any company if you think there might be a chance a competitor will overtake it?

    I appreciate your opinion. Because there are many more people that feel the way you do otherwise AAPL would already be at $550 or more and priced for perfection. People are scared. AAPL has been a long time coming and so it's not a new kid on the block. Would you be more comfortable investing in the newest start-up that has yet to turn a profit and bleeds money?
    Jul 27, 2011. 09:45 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The dark side of the oil inventory release, according to Gregor McDonald: It's counterintuitively bullish, not bearish, for prices. Yes, oil prices will be rocked for months, but an inventory release highlights the fundamental problem of structurally restrained supply. The OECD could have turned to non-OPEC producers and asked them to produce more, but they have no spare capacity.  [View news story]
    So instead of a slow unwinding let's get it out of the way right now. I don't disagree but too we don't need another greater depression.
    Jun 23, 2011. 03:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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