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varan

varan
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  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    Your obfuscation of the issue with unneeded verbose explanations, and pointedly making it about people's personal portfolios rather than objective performance metrics precludes a rational discourse here.

    Good luck with your investments.

    In any case I have achieved my goal of putting my point across that even a well crafted hand picked portfolio of individual equities even during the boom times does not beat the market in total return. I am neither here to change the minds that are already made up, nor to tell you that you are wrong, but just to point out a simple verifiable fact.
    Mar 31, 2015. 03:01 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    Good havens. You should have announced long time ago that you were a mutual funds salesman. I would not have had the temerity to question you or to compare the performance of your portfolio with that of the market.
    Mar 31, 2015. 12:18 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    If I use phrases like 'throw something and hope it sticks', 'nonsense', 'joke', etc. for investment methodologies other than mine, I will not be surprised at people responding in kind - on the contrary, the lack of response will astonish me, for this is a public forum, and no one has a monopoly on using it.
    Mar 30, 2015. 11:40 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    Ah the good old what's in your portfolio dodge.
    Mar 29, 2015. 10:00 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Future Of Seeking Alpha [View article]
    One of the good things that has come out of the proliferation of information is the an order of magnitude enhancement in the ability of the reader, if he is so interested, to evaluate the advice that is being offered. The snake oil will continue to be sold, but those who partake of it will have absolutely no one to to blame but themselves.

    Raw capitalism at its best.
    Mar 29, 2015. 03:55 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Future Of Seeking Alpha [View article]
    Some authors on SA have found a new way to retain their readership and credibility: when you call them on the under-performance of their recommendation with respect to the simpler benchmarks like SPY or MDY, they claim that their 'goals are different from making the most returns on their investments'.

    Mar 29, 2015. 02:21 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    It is very funny that the acolytes focus on my characterization of his comments rather than the elephant in the room- that despite all the fuss, and all the talk of his ability to predict what he is going to get from his investments, his total return has not matched that of VTI, even though he claims that he is in it for the total return too.
    Mar 29, 2015. 02:14 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In High Dividend Yield Stocks: A Sucker Bet? [View article]
    Admirable returns - $.3M to $1.25M from 1980 to 2015 with $75K average withdrawal.

    Of course it all depends on the year to year withdrawal rates if one wants to compare with investing in SPY.

    The simplistic model of $28.2K EOY withdrawal in 1980 increasing at 5% ($75K mean annual withdrawal) per year would have meant that if he just invested SPY, with the same withdrawal schedule he would have had $1.04M today.

    If you increase the income growth rate to 5.5%, the initial withdrawal of $25.3K EOY withdrawal in 1980 increasing at 5.5% ($75K mean annual withdrawal) per year would have meant that if he just invested SPY, with the same withdrawal schedule he would have had $1.76M today.

    (Although SPY was not available in 1980, the total returns of SP500 with dividends reinvested can be found in many sites on the web, including Wikepedia).

    So kind of in the ball park.

    Actually his experience is very illustrative of the idea that even though some returns may look very spectacular, if examined very closely, they are not outside the realm of possibilities.
    Mar 29, 2015. 01:24 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Future Of Seeking Alpha [View article]
    This is a clear signal of the bull run.

    By the end of 1999, everyone had become an expert in stock picking.

    Either the readers are too young, or they have very short memories.
    Mar 27, 2015. 03:03 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    @christine

    I have no desire to change any one's mind.

    Just here to point out, for balance, that any methodology that cannot do better than simple alternatives like VTI is not worth so much trashtalk that chowder constantly engages in
    Mar 26, 2015. 09:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In High Dividend Yield Stocks: A Sucker Bet? [View article]
    What part of "QVAL has been around only for a very short time to justify any meaningful definitive evaluation" required further elaboration?
    Mar 26, 2015. 11:53 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    It's a weird crowd. Even if some strategy cannot beat the simple VTI, it does not matter, for one can always invent some idiosyncratic personal metric by which it can be declared to be gloriously successful, and the crowd bows in awe.
    Mar 26, 2015. 11:08 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mr. Valuation's Best Ideas For Retirement And Dividend Growth Portfolios: Emerson Electric [View article]
    Hey Chowder, no one will come and tell you, if that is what you are looking for, as investing is not about bravado and challenges as you seem to think. No successful investor beats his chest and yells about his successes. Most of the time it is those who want to justify their limited style which may or may not be optimal.
    Mar 26, 2015. 10:31 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investing In High Dividend Yield Stocks: A Sucker Bet? [View article]
    The author manages an ETF called QVAL. Those who are chiding him for not mentioning a specific stock would do well to look at the methodology of QVAL. Hint: it is not about specific stocks but a group of stocks satisfying certain valuation criteria.

    QVAL has been around only for a very short time to justify any meaningful definitive evaluation, but so far YTD it has done pretty well, much better than the usual suspects like JNJ, KMB, PG, KO, T, etc, the favorites of the dividend crowd, and even the list of fifty DG stocks that was the focus of a lot of conversation on SA late last year.
    Mar 26, 2015. 12:26 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Dividend Investors Could Withdraw More Than 4% Of Their Portfolio [View article]
    This notion of running out of shares to sell keeps on coming up. Perhaps by people who have not done simple calculations with some typical stocks. For example compare T and VFINX/SPY thus: start the portfolio at the beginning of a year and keep invested in it. Do not reinvest the dividends of T. At the end of every year, withdraw the amount equal the the year's dividends from T from the SPY account.

    For portfolios initiated in 21 years of the last 24 years, the portfolio of SPY would have had more money at the end of 2014 than the T portfolio. Similar results hold for VZ. If you change SPY by some better portfolios, the results are even more convincing that the fear of selling shares is unfounded in reality.

    Dividends were important in the last century when the transactions required multiple steps and some time, their cost was high, and it was convenient to just have the mailman bring you the dividend checks.

    Twenty First century and the internet and the buying and selling shares at the click of a button have now been around for more than a decade. Time to grow up.
    Mar 25, 2015. 11:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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