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SDS (Seductive Dividend Stocks)

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  • My Dividend Opportunity Portfolio Philosophy And Beginning Picks [View article]
    " You seem very skeptical at my approach but I'm quite confident over time you'd see that there would be bumps like any approach but that it would be a highly successful(for me) approach"
    Yes, I'm very skeptical but let see in 10-20 years...
    Good luck!
    SDS
    Sep 10, 2013. 09:49 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Team Alpha Retirement Portfolio: Dividend Investing In An Uncertain Market [View article]
    Regarded Solutions
    Thank you for the good article. I knew W.B. idea about pricing power but didn't have chance to ask him 8-), so let me address my question to you.
    Three main GEO's goals are 1) to maximize shareholder value (i.e. higher earnings); 2) increase wealth of company workers (i.e. higher salaries); 3) keep old & new customers happy.
    According to pricing power idea old & new customers are happy regardless price. Price increase leads to higher earnings and higher salaries.
    For what heck CEO did not increase prices already to maximum which still keep customers happy?
    Why you want invest in companies where CEO didn't recognize already how easily he can achieve 2 main goals just changing price tag for company's product?
    If W.B. and anybody also cannot answer these 2 question - does "pricing power" idea correct?

    SDS (3:12 am during experiment DV).
    Sep 10, 2013. 06:13 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My Dividend Opportunity Portfolio Philosophy And Beginning Picks [View article]
    Nicholas,
    I'm not a polite person, so let me put cold water on your head:
    a) Expect yield Y=8% in current situation IMO is a way to see troubles with dividend cuts, etc... For what heck do you need such Y "having 30+ working years left"?
    b) Have goal YoC=9% at Y=8% means that your holding time about 2 years, it is IMO not compatible with dividend investing (esp. DGI).
    c) "The Dividend Core stocks are sold only if their yield drops below 5% or their dividend is cut several times I may review them as well for sale. " Although single cut might be OK (http://bit.ly/rrrjkX) I do not recall any good case for firms with 3+ cuts.
    4) What fee as % to investment you pay when you buy 5 shares? Is you goal to feed your stock broker?
    5) "I plan to have an article updating the status every three months unless there are significant changes and then I'll update monthly. " Check who said "Be silent if you cannot say anything important".

    SDS
    Sep 10, 2013. 01:04 AM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Payers Outperforming S&P 500 Index But Not The Equal Weighted Non Payers [View article]
    IMO results for such short period tells us nothing.
    Sep 8, 2013. 10:38 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Cash Cows For Stable Retirement Income And Capital Growth [View article]
    Todd
    Thank you for good article. I kind of disagree with some your ideas in the article (it is typical for me - see my profile):
    1) It is NOT difficult to manage 100+ stock dividend portfolio (see e.g. http://seekingalpha.co...).
    2) "I can build mini-portfolios" - yes you can but IMO investor must consider all these chunks (including e.g. also his/her pension etc) as the single portfolio. Investor can have different criteria for "mini-portfolios" monitoring but should be able to "see the forest behind the trees".
    3) I own all stocks you described nicely but I remember the only wise advise from SEC "past performance does not guaranty future results". Disclaimer: I don't remember other advises from SEC 8-).
    4) IMO buybacks are a modern fad (http://seekingalpha.co...) ,and although it is a factor in my purchase decision I'd prefer large dividends.
    SDS
    Sep 8, 2013. 05:48 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • S&P Yield 1926-2012 [View instapost]
    DGyoungster

    Well I'm a data riven optimist, and form history I learn that:

    a) Growth of dividends was not uniform and there were periods of negative DCR (e.g. in ~ 1930 and in ~2009). For a contrarian it was best time to buy stocks.
    b) World invests very huge $$$ in medical research in last ~ 25 years and people live longer in XX century than in XIX one in developed countries during no war times.
    c) As far as I know /I might be wrong/ nights without sleep reduce the human life time. Nobody has data but it seems me that DGI reduces number of nights without sleep /I'm writing it at ~ 2:30AM but I do not sleep because an experiment in nanotech, not due to my stocks/.

    So if you are 27 years old now you have a good chance to live 80 more years /didn't I tell that I'm an optimist 8-)/.

    SDS
    Sep 8, 2013. 05:33 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Economic Trends All Long-Term Investors Must Know [View article]
    Thank you for the good article Ralph!

    I'm not an economist and probably too naive, so please explain

    1) Why import/export has ANY role in WORLD GDP? - in my opinion they cancel each other for whole WORLD. I guess almost each country has dis-balance between import/export but not whole world.... I agree that interdependancy between countries becomes stronger but example you use seems me strange.

    2) Correlation CL and oil might be .... just, well, a correlation.... (I don't know that raw material CL uses but I expect the almost same as before 2008, i.e. not mostly oil).
    CL price can correlate with population of sardines - does it tell something? For me nothing... But then I see that CL/oil started to correlate exactly at the moment when developed countries started to print money as crazy it tells me that REAL inflation (not calculated by officials) is going up. Am I right?

    3) "Many wealth managers use the historical performance of the S&P 500 to justify their current position in domestic equities." Well as you know many S&P 500 firms get big chunk of their earnings abroad but US government practically doesn't allow them to bring money in US via taxation. At the same time US government prints money. Does one hand of US government knows that another hand is doing?

    I hope to see answers and continue....
    SDS
    Sep 7, 2013. 01:42 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Economic Trends All Long-Term Investors Must Know [View article]
    Hi,

    I'm not an economist and probably misunderstand something, but my logic is follows:
    1) The developed countries (US, EU & Japan) print money as crazy in last few years. All these M1,M2, M3 are technicalies, number of money circulated in economies of developed countries significantly increased due to Ben & Co. These increase is much more stronger than any GDP in these years and any reasonable expected GDP in next let say 10 years in the developed countries.
    2) Number of goods/services produced in developed countries does not grow as fast as money supply. Consumption of services and goods in these countries is almost constant mostly because of demography.
    3) Consumption in emerging markets increases but also not as fast as money supply from developed countries in last few years. The biggest country in emerging markets (China) manipulates money supply and most other economical data but because their GDP and consumption grows they have to print money and change part of these money on debt of developed countries (mostly by positive trade balance).
    4) Interest rates on Treasures are low now because there is a stupid buyer (Fed) which almost doesn't care now about price and "buy high". Sooner or later US government & Fed (again I'm not economist and to me both are the same in this comment) will need cash to pay medicare, social securities, debt, etc... and they will "sell low"
    These factors IMO should lead to high inflation in near (less than decade) future.
    Am I wrong?

    SDS
    Sep 7, 2013. 01:05 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Great Investors Know How To Interpret Data [View article]
    Jeff & folks,

    I'm not an economist and probably misunderstand something, but my logic is follows:
    1) The developed countries (US, EU & Japan) print money as crazy in last few years. All these M1,M2, M3 are technicalies, number of money circulated in economies of developed countries significantly increased due to Ben & Co.
    2) Number of goods/services produced in developed countries does not grow as fast as money supply. Consumption of services and goods in these countries is almost constant mostly because of demography.
    3) Consumption in emerging markets increases but also not as fast as money supply in last few years. The biggest country in emerging markets (China) manipulates money supply and most other economical data but because their GDP and consumption grows they have to print money and change part of these money on debt of developed countries (mostly by positive trade balance).
    4) Interest rates on Treasures are low now because there is a stupid buyer (Fed) which almost doesn't care now about price and "buy high". Sooner or later US government & Fed (again I'm not economist and to me both are the same in this comment) will need cash to pay medicare, social securities, debt, etc... and they will "sell low"
    These factors IMO should lead to high inflation in near (less than decade) future.
    Am I wrong?

    SDS
    Sep 7, 2013. 12:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Do Retirees Need A Dividend ETF Or A Portfolio Of Individual Stocks - Part Two [View article]
    Bob,
    IMO 5 years is too short to conclude.
    "performance history of the current 102 Dividend Champions" - survived I guess...
    SDS
    Sep 6, 2013. 07:29 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Common Sense Strategies For Mitigating Risk In Your Retirement Portfolios: Part 2 [View article]
    Chuck,

    Thank you for the good article. I agree that risk has many faces and to me important to keep it coherent (http://seekingalpha.co...).

    Let me ask your opinion:
    You wrote "diversification strategies should be made based on your expectations about the future potential of the asset in question"
    How many different assets an average retail self-directed investor does really understand to have reasonable expectations about them?

    SDS
    Sep 6, 2013. 07:00 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Weighting Portfolios: Equally, Variably Or By Dividends Generated? [View article]
    Mike,
    Probably it was already pointed but just in case: a) Dividend weighted portfolio faces huge trading because of different DGR, special dividends, etc.... b) It was shown that fundamental and equal weighings had outperform cap weighting.
    SDS
    Sep 5, 2013. 10:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Bears Attack Kinder Morgan [View article]
    IMO a serious person should not tweet a report until it finished or put stamp "work-in-progress" on it. So it looks like attempt to manipulate market.
    SDS
    Sep 5, 2013. 10:41 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wonderful Wizard Of O [View article]
    Brad,
    Thank you for the article. I don't know another such friendly to dividend investors company as O (does anybody?). Tom Lewis remains on BoD and formally BoD decides on dividends, so I hope for continuation of their excellent dividend history.
    Disclaimers: I own O. My hope is just emotional, no information or other reason behind it.
    SDS
    Sep 5, 2013. 10:05 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Weighting Portfolios: Equally, Variably Or By Dividends Generated? [View article]
    IMO scheduled re-balancing is possibility for income. This income is going to your broker.
    SDS
    Sep 5, 2013. 12:06 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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