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chowder

chowder
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ABT, AFL, APD, ARLP, AT, BDT, BF.B, BMO, BP, BRK.A, BRK.B, C, CBRL, CINF, CL, COP, CTL, CVX, D, DE, DRI, ENB, EPD, EXC, FSP, FTR, GD, GE, GILD, GIS, GPC, HCBK, HCN, HGIC, IBM, INTC, JNJ, KMB, KMI, KMP, KO, KRFT, LEG, LINE, LNCO, LO, MAA, MCD, MDLZ, MDT, MHR, MKC, MMP, MO, NFLX, NHI, NLY, NNN, O, OHI, PBI, PEP, PG, PM, PNY, PSX, RIG, RY, SBSI, SDRL, SDY, SNY, SO, SPY, SYY, T, TE, TGT, TIP, TOT, TUP, UHT, UNP, UNS, UTX, VIG, VVC, VZ, WAG, WEC, WM, WMT, WU, XLU, XOM
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  • Conoco Phillips: High-Yield Blue Chip Heading In The Right Direction [View article]
    Curtistocrat, it is my hope to keep COP. I count the PSX spinoff as a dividend increase. I'm not concerned at this time because I do think they will raise it later this year. If they do, I have no intention of selling it this year.

    If a company does freeze the dividend though, the rules of my portfolio management strategy require that I lock in gains and move on. No justification to hold on is required. I get a pay raise or I don't.

    My Mission Statement dictates it! ... The Mission Statement is to build an income stream that is reliable, predictable and increasing. If that formula isn't met, it doesn't support my goals.

    I think COP will come through. I certainly hope it does, it has been a good holding for me so far. I intend on keeping it that way or take the profits if COP disappoints.

    I will not ride a company up and down in share price without getting annual pay raises.
    Mar 4 01:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Perfect Portfolio [View article]
    You should have asked for reasons not to buy before you bought. They won't matter now, you're in.

    I hope it works out for you.
    Mar 4 01:21 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Team Alpha Portfolio Update: Continued Growth And Now More Cash [View article]
    Jane, yeas some of the K-1's do come late. I receive my K-1's from EPD around the first week of April, but you can get them online sooner.

    I turned them in to my CPA and he was so swamped, he didn't have time to do my return by the deadline. So, he filed an extension for me.

    That was fine with me. I haven't received a tax refund in over 40 years. I always have to write the IRS a check. So, go ahead and extend. I did send an estimate to the IRS to stay in compliance and my taxes were eventually filed with no problems.

    The best part was the fee I had to pay the CPA got delayed too. ... Ha!

    He didn't get paid until after the returns were sent in.

    With regard to multiple state taxes, it could happen. That's what we pay the CPA for. It's their job to handle it. Most MLP's would require a huge position to have that happen though.

    I agree with RS. My job is to make money. The CPA's job is to keep as much of it as possible. He doesn't tell me how to do my job and I don't tell him how to do his.
    Mar 4 01:16 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    @westcoaster, just because something is at a 52 week high doesn't mean it is overvalued. How do you define overvalued?
    Mar 4 07:23 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 7 Investing Truths [View article]
    Pendragon, I view a high quality utility as a bond-type holding and it also provides dividend growth. Better yield, better dividend growth, and provides "some" downside protection in market corrections.
    Mar 3 07:51 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    Invest4Dividends, you've made several comments about chasing after dividend growth and then you want to recommend YUM and WFM? ... I guess it's okay to chase growth then, eh?
    Mar 3 07:48 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    Clear Think, I didn't think we were talking about buying, I thought we were talking about selling.

    You said ... >>> Seems every time I sell part of a position lately due to thinking it is over-valued, it keeps on going. <<<

    That's what I was responding to. There are ways to determine whether you should hold on to a winner or sell part of it. My next project is going to an article, written as an instablog on this very subject.
    Mar 3 07:40 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Perfect Portfolio [View article]
    Invest4Dividends, I don't understand your definition of bubble highs. The companies you mention have a history of selling at a premium. It took the Great Recession just to bring them down to fair value, and the only company above that sold at undervalue was JNJ, and it took the Great Recession and a ton of recalls to bring the price down to where the company was undervalued.

    All of them are selling at a lower PE than their historical PE. All of them are selling at a discount to their historical premium price. (Last 15 years).

    Historical PE ... Current PE:

    MCD ... 18.8 ... 17.5
    PEP ... 21.5 ... 18.0
    KO .... 25.0 ... 18.5
    PG .... 19.5 ... 19.0
    JNJ ... 19.9 ... 14.6

    Current PE doesn't look anything like a bubble high to me. They may not be the valuations you want, but when you want to own companies that almost always sell at a premium, sometimes you have to pay up for quality.
    Mar 3 07:04 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Market Strategies - Rules Of The Game [View instapost]
    Jantis, good question. The thing about technical indicators is that you have to use them in the time frame you are talking about. Since I was talking about 1 year relative strength, you have to shorten your charts from 5 years to one year.

    The longer the time frame, the more smoother the ride appears to be and you found that out using the 5 year chart.

    When I use a 1 year chart, I'm using it to gauge the next 6 to 12 months, nothing more! I'll look for that short term momentum to get the position off to a fast start. That's all we're looking for. By getting off to a fast start, you generate a buffer for when the market pulls back.

    If you can't find a company with strong relative strength for the past year, that doesn't mean you can't purchase it. I just bought DRI knowing it might take a year or two for them to start generating decent return.

    When I'm trying to decide between two companies, and they are close in comparison, then I'll go with the stronger relative strength and then come back to the other company at a later date.
    Mar 3 10:18 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    Yes Sir! I'll third that motion. ... Ha!
    Mar 3 07:01 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    I agree DVK. My focus is the income investing strategy section and that's where an article like this should show up.

    My second best section is retirement.

    In the dividend ideas section, I only search for authors I know.
    Mar 3 06:55 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Dividend Aristocrats: Where Have All The Bargains Gone? [View article]
    Twins and Red Sox? Oh man, I'm jealous.
    Mar 3 06:50 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Perfect Portfolio [View article]
    >>> Utilities are not for everyone chowda <<<

    Yeah, I know. I recall as a younger man telling people I'm not going to own any widow and orphan companies. I'm better than that. I'm a growth guy. Onward and upward babee!

    Meanwhile, my sister who knows absolutely nothing about investing, decided many years ago to start a DRIP with D which is her utility company. They offered people the opportunity to overpay their utility bill and the company would purchase shares. So, she would add an extra $50 or $100 to her bill every month, depending on her finances at the time, and she purchased D. After about 10 years of this, I was blown away with how successful one could become owning a utility. It opened my eyes. I couldn't figure it out at first. Then it dawned on me. Utilities are your defensive line in football. Their job is to defend against the market scoring against them. High quality utilities, I came to find out, are the "Steel Curtain." When the market is taking people out, Mean Joe Greene (Mr Utility) is going to stop you cold at the line of scrimmage.

    I found that utilities will underperform in a strong market environment, but they are steady in a falling or flat market. The advantage to them is that after a market pull back, utilities don't have as much ground to make up. Therefore, what little gain they do get, is all gravy.

    People are surprised when they find out how well utilities have performed over the years. People overlook the offensive and defensive lines, they focus on the QB, receivers, defensive secondary people, and sometimes the linebackers. That's a lot more exciting.

    In the end though, it's those linemen that allow the exciting players to perform.

    So yeah, utilities aren't for everyone. They are for people who want to have a balance between chasing the dream (growth) and building the dream (having a solid foundation).
    Mar 3 06:24 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Perfect Portfolio [View article]
    Invest4Dividends, how do you define a bubble high?
    Mar 3 06:03 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • You Maniacs, You Blew It Up [View article]
    I don't have an annuity and don't plan on getting one, but I can see a need for it. Some people don't receive a pension. I can see where someone might buy an annuity to provide the same benefit a pension would, a steady income that is locked in. I suppose that could bring a lot of peace of mind to some. Expensive perhaps, but sometimes peace of mind sells at a premium too. ... Ha!
    Mar 3 05:56 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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