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  • Yongye International (YONG): Is Their Story Too Good To Be True? [View instapost]
    "With YONG, the stock price closed at $8.40 when this article posted. The stock price closed at $7.69 yesterday. So, despite the assertions, the stock price has not done well."

    Do you think there is a strong correlation between the short term price fluctuations of YONG and the accuracy of your assertions? If you do - like your comment suggests - you need a new username.
    Mar 6, 2011. 10:00 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Yongye International (YONG): Is Their Story Too Good To Be True? [View instapost]
    So you are not such an inquiring mind after all then...
    Jan 23, 2011. 09:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Yongye International (YONG): Is Their Story Too Good To Be True? [View instapost]
    "So, you have a tendency to make completely unsubstantiated claims. It may be embarrassing for you, but it is true."
    - I don't feel embarrassed. The first paragraph of my original comment is hyperbole you fool. I even added a comment that "I'm also very modest :)," so that even people with linguistic or cognitive challenges would understand that I was not stating a universal truth.

    "The point is that if you were really knowledgeable, and knew what was important, then you would be posting a much more informative, helpful post."
    - People with proprietary knowledge of these topics, like myself, generally do not share a significant amount information for free. I get paid by for this type of analysis by companies investing in this space.

    "I think that you may believe you know so much, but then you make your claims without any basis."
    - You're right. It's not important to me if you believe me or not.

    "Consequently, I have no basis to conclude that anything you say is true, or false for that matter, without researching it myself."
    - That's a healthy attitude which we share.

    I offered to help you if you had any questions, but you ignored that (key) point of my comment and instead focused, yet again, on whether or not you believe my claims. Why don't you put my knowledge to the test.
    Jan 21, 2011. 07:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Yongye International (YONG): Is Their Story Too Good To Be True? [View instapost]
    "If there is anyone who looked at YONG that didn't know these simple elementary things, then they didn't do the most basic work."
    - Most investors indeed don't do "the most basic work." For example, I don't think many Yongye investors or commentators know about the plant protection purchasing habits of farmers at the village level or about ongoing changes in the Chinese agrochem distribution system. This is key to Yongye's future.

    "My guess would be that you don't know much about China's fertilizer industry..."
    - Your guess sucks.

    "...and that there are many people who know much more about it than you..."
    - There are people who know the Chinese fertilizer industry better, but they are not part of the English speaking investment community and they have no dd experience (save two or three PE investment professionals who actively invest in the sector in China.)

    ", especially if you think your post was informative at all."
    - Easy on the fallacies; my feelings about how informative the post was has no impact on my level of knowledge about the industry.

    Need more info? Don't be shy to ask. I might answer if you ease up on the personal insults and stick to the facts. ;)
    Jan 21, 2011. 01:49 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Yongye International (YONG): Is Their Story Too Good To Be True? [View instapost]
    I know more about China's fertilizer industry than anybody on seekingalpha, or about China for that matter. I'm also very modest. :)

    Anyway, don't wanna give you too much info, but can provide the following info reg. your comments:

    - There are indeed more than 600,000 "villages" in China.
    - These villages are served by over 2,000 distributors of varying sizes.
    - Most of you need to rethink the concept of a "store". At the village level most of the "stores" don't even have doors or windows. They look more like a shabby garage with some bags of fertilizer on the ground and maybe an old display case with pesticide products. (Don't think all the stores look like the one's you see in Yongye's pics.) Anyway, most stores in China look like this; they are family owned stores that serve one or two villages. Nobody, and I mean nobody, knows exactly how many of these stores there are, but my guess is around 250,000 - this is only an educated guess.
    - Some villages may not have access to a local store. They can order products from China Post, or in some cases from some enterprising farmer who has taken to peddling products on a bicycle or motorcycle.
    - Some farmers don't buy at these local, village level stores but travel, sometimes for hours, to a county store, or even a provincial level store, where prices are better and they get more information.
    - The Yongye franchise stores don't only carry Yongye products. Yongye still have to compete with other companies.

    Got other stuff to do. May answer questions if you have any engaging ones.
    Jan 20, 2011. 10:38 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why the iPad May Succeed in China, Where the iPhone Failed [View article]
    I am not missing the author's point. My issue is that the author picked an issue he doesn't really understand in order to sell his firm's market research services.

    He raises two points for why the iPad will succeed better than the iPhone. Both points are straightforward and easy to understand. Unfortunately they show that he doesn't get the main reasons for why the iPhone wan't selling before.

    Your comment is more astute and on point than the article. Most people don't know that it was Chinese government intervention (WiFi issue) and a failure to reach an agreement with China Mobile (OS control, etc.) that led to slow sales.

    One example he doesn't get this is his comment: "What sane company would delay selling a key product to the world's second-largest consumer market, where retail sales continue to grow at 16% to 18% a year?"

    It just annoys me when people who don't understand an issue feel a need to comment in main stream media, Forbes no less.

    Regarding WiFi, I know that he doesn't have an issue with WiFi! I am telling you that this was a major issue people didn't buy the phone in China (me included). Why buy an iPhone for the Chinese market when it doesn't have WiFi!!!?? Now this issue is settled.

    WE WILL SOON KNOW IF I AM RIGHT OR IF THE AUTHOR IS RIGHT: you still have to use Unicom as the carrier so we will soon see if the major reason people didn't buy it was because of Unicom/contract length or because of the WiFI issue.
    Oct 4, 2010. 09:57 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Why the iPad May Succeed in China, Where the iPhone Failed [View article]
    Sorry, this is BS. Modern trade is growing faster in China than in any major market in the world. Chinese consumers are not aliens; they value the benefits provided by modern trade just as "we" do.
    Sep 27, 2010. 10:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why the iPad May Succeed in China, Where the iPhone Failed [View article]
    If I were you I would delete this article unless you want to look like a complete fool. Firstly, the iPhone is not failing in China. Secondly, with regard to your "research", the lack of WiFi on the iPhones previously sold in China was the main thing preventing even stronger sales of the iPhone. The iPhones sold in China now have WiFi.

    O..and iPhone 4 has already launched in China. Try going to the Apple Store in Beijing and ask for an iPhone 4. You will find out it is completely sold out. How is this is a sign of the iPhone failing in China?
    Sep 27, 2010. 10:53 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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