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jamesbwood

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  • Chinese army unit 61398, also known as "Comment Crew," has been identified as most probably responsible for numerous cyberattacks on U.S. targets, security company Mandiant has alleged in a report. While Mandiant didn't name specific targets, victims include Coca Cola (KO) - when it was trying to acquire Chinese company Huiyuan Juice Group for $2.4B - and VMware's (VMW) RSA, as well as a firm with access to over 60% of oil and gas pipelines in North America. [View news story]
    Aren't we sill looking for weapons of mass destruction?

    How about some real evidence instead of these PR campaigns (from both sides)?
    Feb 19 11:53 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In the wake of numerous scandals involving Chinese companies listed on Western stock exchanges, Chinese authorities are cracking down on ... those who raise the questions. Huang Kun - part of the team which put together a negative report on Silvercorp (SVM) - was arrested in Beijing at year's end and expects to soon face criminal charges. Documents suggest Silvercorp worked with officials on the investigation of Mr. Huang and even helped pay for it. [View news story]
    That correction requires "we the people" to be in charge.

    Corporations are now people too, with much deeper pocket books. . .
    Feb 17 09:20 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Notoriously poor market-timers, the central banks purchased 534.6 tons of gold in 2012, according to the World Gold Council. It's the largest amount the banks - last seen unloading their gold at less than $500/oz. - have bought since 1964. [View news story]
    What do you mean, their monetary policies are GREAT. Take risks and pocket all the gains. Take risks and get someone else to pay for the losses all while giving themselves bonuses to retain "top talent". Pay off both parties to insure nothing of substance changes. Sounds like win win to me. . .
    Feb 14 01:52 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Hedge Funds: The Most Expensive Bargain In Town [View article]
    I'm sure some are good. On average, I'll take my money elsewhere.

    http://fxn.ws/V7gg31
    Jan 15 04:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Sturm Ruger: Looks So Good, That It Can't (Or Couldn't) Be... [View article]
    True. But domestic weapons are also supposed to be locked up when not in use.
    Dec 25 12:47 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Lawmakers in the U.S. see a quick-patch solution as the best hope of averting the automatic tax increases and spending cuts set to hit on January 1. Over the weekend the blame game was in full cycle while key Senators hit the talk TV circuit. The last word from President Obama is that he would immediately sign a bill into law extending tax cuts for those making $250K or less. [View news story]
    Thanks Eagle1003 for writing in. I apologize if some of my fellow Americans are not as polite as what you are used to. Most of us Americans are "rar rar Rar!!! Go America! F Yeah" without considering the possibility that we could learn something from other countries. We are often arrogant. I sometimes think we are often living off a legacy of hard work and innovation created by our forefathers. We were isolationists prior to WW2 - boy have things changed. . . now we are almost always at war.

    We as a nation don't seem to know that other solutions exist: when Germany bailed out their banks, they put caps on executive salaries and bonuses. We threw even more money at our banks and asked them to solve the problems they created. What about German banks that don't like the $ caps? That is just fine - the free market has a solution that tends to redistribute wealth to more compentant manages: it is called Bankrupcy. Some of us Americans will call you socialist but when huge corporations take large risks and get all the profits if things go their way but get the taxpayers to bail them out if they don't. . . well I don't know what that is but what it sure isn't Adam Smith capitalism. Here in the Excited States, our banks and other big businesses essentially own those in "poly ticks".

    We also don't how low our return on investment for dollar spent on healthcare is. We spend way more for the same level of care as most developed nations. Your system, by the way, is EXCELLENT and was always there when I needed it as a graduate student. Kudos.

    The same is true for Education, especially k to 12 education. On average, your k-12 teachers are better trained and higher caliber. I think we do well and catch up a bit at the University level but that is getting cut to.

    And like most developed countries, you Canadians are not nearly as violent as your brothers south of the boarder. You have much less domestic violent crime and you are not going into debt to maintain a near continuous state of distant foreign warfare - from Vietnam to Iraq - for over 4 decades. You do contribute to international efforts when asked - thanks for that.

    Your real estate market didn't crash like ours did. With those "socialist" regulators Canadian big business was not able to rebundle low quality mortages and market them as AAA. Nor did you have robo signing. . . You would call that fraud and send people to jail as well as roast them on this hour has 22 minutes. So 10% of your middle class didn't lose their homes due to unchecked corporate greed.

    Most of us Americans do very little international travel. Most of us don't read news sources that originate out side of the US. We just don't know. Please excuse our ignorance.

    Oh yeah, your beer is pretty damn good too. And since you travel, I'm sure you know that there are other sports in the world besides hockey. . . Now, if you could just get your grandparents to drive the speed limit and stay out of the fast lane here in South Florida. . . You should at least buy them some pillows so they can see over the steering wheel.

    Merry Christmas

    James
    Small business owner
    12 years living abroad of which 6 were in Nova Scotia, Canada
    Dec 24 08:06 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Lawmakers in the U.S. see a quick-patch solution as the best hope of averting the automatic tax increases and spending cuts set to hit on January 1. Over the weekend the blame game was in full cycle while key Senators hit the talk TV circuit. The last word from President Obama is that he would immediately sign a bill into law extending tax cuts for those making $250K or less. [View news story]
    Good point Joe. "Small" (and productive) business often miss out. No bailouts, corrupt/incompetent local inspectors, not able to write the laws to suit themselves, few lobbyists, etc. And while I do support the tax breaks for families making 250k or less, why EARNED income - labor - is taxed more than investments I'll never know (although I think it has something to do with the truly rich writing the laws to suit themselves).

    Your mileage may vary.

    James
    Also a small business owner.
    Dec 24 07:29 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Sturm Ruger: Looks So Good, That It Can't (Or Couldn't) Be... [View article]
    Fort Hood logic? Lots of guns there. . .

    As much as we like it to, I don't think this issue can be resolved with simple sound bites (from either side). Both sides have been over this ground for decades. . .

    As for investing, the durability of the product is a negative. Ammo is expendable, like a nice cold Coke (for the Buffet crowd) or a Naty Light and NASC Car race (for the Tea Party crowd).

    Your mileage may vary.
    Dec 24 07:07 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Longevity Risk, Through The Eyes Of An Actuary [View article]
    John and Luke make some good valid points. While I do see some crazy "trend chasing" here, I do think the SA crowd in general is much more in tune with their finances than your average American whom annuities generally would be a better product for (assuming no shenanigans).
    Dec 24 06:04 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Longevity Risk, Through The Eyes Of An Actuary [View article]
    This is one logical place the "betting against the house" comment comes from.
    Dec 24 12:18 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Longevity Risk, Through The Eyes Of An Actuary [View article]
    Shyster Risk: The risk that the financial product purchased does not behave the way the salesman described, always to your detriment (it might follow the fine print that your aging father didn't, and cannot physically, actually read). Very large commissions may or may not also be involved. As an educated "layperson" that reads SA, I find that the shyster risk is high in the financial and insurance industries and especially high with annuities and life insurance.

    This is a very tough crowd for those products.

    There are some good people out there - this author sounds like one of them. But for me, as long as I am mentally competent to make my own investment decisions and continue to on average, beat the average, that is what I will be doing. When I'm older and the math tells me I can no longer make more good than bad investment decisions, and my wife is also not able to make these decisions, then this sort of product might be appealing. But probably not, I'll probably go with a diversity of div paying stocks and income from managed rental properties - less shyster risk.

    Your mileage may vary.
    Dec 24 12:02 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Adding Yahoo To The 'Young And Restless' Portfolio [View article]
    Interesting recommendation that I would not have considered otherwise. Having said that, like so much I see here on SA, it seems we are arriving late to the party. There may well be more upside but this stock has already made a big move up.
    Dec 22 10:57 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Star Scientific And TherapeuticsMD: 2 Overvalued Pseudo-Pharmaceuticals [View article]
    Thanks for this informative article. After a bit of further research, action was taken on suggestion #1.

    I couldn't find txmd.ob but did find txmd on the nsdq. I'm not seeing any options available for this company in the sandboxes I play in.

    Dec 21 08:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans won't bring their "Plan B" tax-cut proposal to a vote tonight, as Speaker John Boehner says he doesn't have the votes; the House will recess until after Christmas. DJIA futures slip 0.2%. Boehner: "Now it is up to the president to work with Senator Reid on legislation to avert the fiscal cliff." Updated: S&P 500 e-Mini futures dive, limit down. [View news story]
    Bought in today! Woot!
    Dec 20 10:34 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • House Republicans won't bring their "Plan B" tax-cut proposal to a vote tonight, as Speaker John Boehner says he doesn't have the votes; the House will recess until after Christmas. DJIA futures slip 0.2%. Boehner: "Now it is up to the president to work with Senator Reid on legislation to avert the fiscal cliff." Updated: S&P 500 e-Mini futures dive, limit down. [View news story]
    The cliff may be the only way to cut military spending.
    Dec 20 10:33 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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