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philhtur

philhtur
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  • Walgreen Vs. CVS Caremark: Comparison Of 2 Pharmacy Retail Giants [View article]
    Freebra: Thanks for your reply. The incident I mention is not the only failure in customer service I've experienced at CVS... just the most egregious. Their customer fulfillment processes are weak in my experience: a company's financials don't always capture the customer side of the company and I believe that CVS is an example.

    BTW I did report the error to the store manager and received an apology from the young pharmacist.... but my confidence was shaken.
    Jul 7 07:59 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Walgreen Vs. CVS Caremark: Comparison Of 2 Pharmacy Retail Giants [View article]
    Thanks for the financial analysis.

    I've made money investing in both companies. I'm long WAG at this time.
    In my own experience, living in New England, Walgreen's customer service is far superior to CVS's. I sold my CVS shares when the local CVS pharmacist made a serious error with my wife's prescription; fortunately, I discovered it before walking out of the store. I've never returned.

    I view the tobacco ban as a good publicity stunt for CVS, but until they correct their customer fulfillment processes (and train their pharmacists better), "social responsibility" doesn't translate to social benefit in my book.
    Jul 6 09:35 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Zacks' Bear Of The Day: Ericsson [View article]
    Ericsson holds a portfolio of very important wireless patents, including those for LTE. It's made a slow but sturdy rise from about $9 to $12.25 over the 3 years I held it... not great, but adequate. With the telecom build out worldwide, I think there's plenty of upside.
    Jun 12 09:08 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Target Corporation: The Factors To Consider [View article]
    Kevinconway: I respect your experience and viewpoint. I've sat in boardrooms also. Target needs to find a person who relishes the opportunity to turn around the Canadian operation and make a name for themselves and their team. It's often quite appealing to a leader to succeed to a position where there's a "mess" to clean up. Time will tell.
    May 30 08:38 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Target Corporation: The Factors To Consider [View article]
    I think you're giving the market reaction too much credit. The selloff is due to uncertainty since no one new was named or groomed.

    The CFO, who is now the interim CEO, spoke on CNBC a few days ago and I was impressed with his command.

    I wouldn't be so sure the cupboard is bare.
    May 29 09:15 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Target Corporation: The Factors To Consider [View article]
    epaulis: Good point and key for me!
    May 29 11:27 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Target Corporation: The Factors To Consider [View article]
    I think these are some factors to consider, but far the all the factors! Target still has a strong brand and a healthy dividend to reward patience. (I'm long the stock which I bought recently so I am not among those shareholders who have suffered a big decline.) Apparently you don't think replacing the head of the Canadian operations and firing the CEO are "any steps to improve its Canadian segment", but I do. Retail is very people-oriented and leaders who can rally the troops and anticipate the desires of customers are the most important strategic levers.

    I'd agree that there's a lot of work to do and the company needs to bring up (or in) strong leadership. But I think the worst is over and a 10% downside risk should not scare long-term investors away when a 40% gain over the next 2 years is a reasonable Target.
    May 28 07:02 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Exploit The Coming Natural Gas Export Explosion: Frank Curzio [View article]
    Canuck Economist: Thanks for your reply. If I worried about Keynes dictum, I wouldn't bother to invest... I bet neither would you.

    If you believe there are better opportunities out there, then have at it! No one has to invest in Curzio's thesis. I happen to be long a number of these names and my returns are good, so I continue to hold a portion of my portfolio in this sector.

    There may be a correction coming in Oil and Gas but I don't think there's much of a premium in the market for Ukraine. Canadian tar sands oil is very expensive to produce (I find estimates of $70-80 BBL credible), so I don't see that as exerting much downward pressure. Demand for gasoline worldwide (from emerging markets' new car drivers) is growing. Many trucking fleets in the US are converting to CNG and LNG. So, yes, there are always many sides to an investment thesis. Over the foreseeable time horizon, though, I like the domestic energy story.
    May 11 12:35 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Exploit The Coming Natural Gas Export Explosion: Frank Curzio [View article]
    I don't know where you get your pricing info, but CNBC reports the WTI oil price this morning (and throughout the last few weeks) at $99 plus; Brent at $105 plus. LNG export is coming in 2015; Cheniere has the license. I think Frank Curzio's comments are directed to long-term investors, not short-term plays.
    May 10 09:40 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Congress to hold hearings on LNG exports [View news story]
    I should have said the demonstration phase then. Such a stock is way too speculative for my investments, but best wishes to you. Breakthroughs in battery technology can be game changers.
    Mar 28 11:46 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • It's academic: Consumers don't need dealerships [View news story]
    I think it should be up to consumer choice. If I want a dealer, then I'll go. If not, I'll buy online.

    The dealers are not the only interested parties in this story. So are the car manufacturers: GM often stuffs its dealerships with inventory so that its quarterly sales are artificially high. This happened in the last quarter making their financial results look better than they really were. If I had more guts I'd short GM.
    Mar 26 12:40 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Congress to hold hearings on LNG exports [View news story]
    Thanks for the reference to Electrovaya. I'm glad to see advancements in battery technology. But its products appear to be a long way from commercial... more in the developmental stage, I'd surmise. They are operating at a loss despite considerable support from the Canadian authorities. A bright future perhaps but as Orrick says, "There is many a slip between cup and lip."
    Mar 26 11:15 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Congress to hold hearings on LNG exports [View news story]
    By the time you liquefy NG and ship it, you can be sure that the market price for US gas abroad will be much closer to $10 MMBTU that pipeline NG here. Let the market dictate price.
    Besides, as others have commented below, the US ability to export LNG in significant quantities is years off. Our exports will not reduce the price of LNG in Europe or here in the US for 5 years at least.
    Mar 25 01:14 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Congress to hold hearings on LNG exports [View news story]
    I worked in the electricity industry for nearly 30 years and I'm generally a big fan of the product. But battery technology is still a major hurdle for use in transportation... and while the marginal fuel of choice on the grid today is natural gas, the fuel mix of the grid undergoes a very gradual transition; furthermore, reliability concerns will always reward fuel diversity. So I don't think hybrids and electrics will skip nat gas entirely. The energy density of nat gas is a big factor in its favor.
    Mar 25 12:31 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Congress to hold hearings on LNG exports [View news story]
    I'm not following you here. How are energy market more dicey than exporting beef, or wheat or cars? None of these markets are perfectly free either, but the US allows them. I think US should allow oil and coal exports, too. But it's difficult for domestic coal producers to compete with South African and other global competitors.
    My point is government restriction on LNG and oil exports are ultimately counter-productive and make the world a poorer place.
    Mar 25 12:22 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
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