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Frankj78

Frankj78
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  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Kwm3

    A big YES on taxing carried interest.
    Apr 10 09:41 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    The Shadow knows...
    Apr 8 09:51 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Al,

    I'll give it a shot. From a philosophical point of view I don't think the high frequency trading benefits anyone but the flash traders. I know some might weigh in with the argument that it provides liquidity, but I don't believe that.

    So if we accept that it is an activity that should be discouraged (and this may be a big assumption for some), and if we also accept that Congress uses the tax code for social engineering purposes, then it follows that there might be some benefit if they can figure out a way to charge a toll on these trades.

    A key element of taxation is that a tax should be efficient to collect. That's true here. So there's an assumption by me that the gov't could get the data in a reasonable time and in an accurate manner. Also, that the levy would apply whether the entity making the trades was in country or offshore.

    That's what I have, let the slings and arrows begin.
    Apr 1 03:52 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Word(s) of the Day?

    Inter alia, the agency is looking at whether traders manipulate the market by placing a set of orders and then very quickly canceling them.

    "Inter alia." An attorney told me this simply means "among other things."
    Apr 1 10:58 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Bob 123

    We Agree!! (to a point.) I have thought a small tax on HFTs is necessary for a long time. We pedestrian traders, not so much. You are probably right, it would be politically possible.
    Apr 1 10:50 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    The article you cited says that narrowing the gap between our ranking and those of other high income countries will require more than simply expanding access. It goes on to mention some health and life-style factors that need addressing: obesity, inactivity, hypertension, high blood sugar, cholesterol, etc. Expanding access could help, but we are not going to move up dramatically in the rankings.

    I tried to post something earlier in response to a few folks, but I don't know where it went. It had to do with the reasonable parts of the ACA that might have been put in place that benefit people: pre-existing, allowing young adults to stay on a policy, cafeteria type plans vs. plans that include stuff that people don't need given their stage of life. I think this could have been done with some serious negotiation between both parties, the states and the industry. I'm not going to try and re-do it.

    Washington DC has proved it is capable of ramming something through if one party or another has the votes. They haven't proved they're capable of a serious give and take that moves something forward for the benefit of the country.
    Mar 31 04:50 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    It is just as much of a presumption to assume that a socialized, single payer system would be better for all.

    What I like is the ability to keep kids on an employer plan -- which is in place under ACA, and has helped us. And, yes I realize that w/o ACA that we would not have that. The old model was they were covered if in college full time, then off, once they graduated.

    I would have liked insurance companies to have more flexibility to sell across state lines. I would like less dictation by gov't as to what a policy had to cover under provisions of the ACA and more of the cafeteria approach so people could tailor a plan closer to their situation.

    I think the pre-existing condition exclusion prior to ACA could have been addressed if insurance companies were told to address this as a condition of being able to offer policies. High risk pools if you will. My first choice would be for state legislatures to do this, then if necessary the feds step in.
    Mar 31 02:41 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    I am not on either of the gov't programs you mentioned. Don't make presumptions about my life.
    Mar 31 12:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Take five, why don't you explain it to me.
    Mar 31 12:50 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    Bob 123 says, "If it is mediocre -- well, we would all be in it together. It would be as good or as mediocre as the public tolerated and demanded."

    Oh, that's a great outlook: turn healthcare into something like the Dept of Motor Vehicles, crummy, but that's OK as long as we all suffer equally under the centrally controlled diktats.
    Mar 31 12:05 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    DC:

    Never fear. The prosecutorial apparatus is gnawing its way up the food chain. Why, just yesterday a TV huckster got sentenced to 10 years for selling books containing phony weight loss advice. I'm sure Cohen and Corzine will be taken into custody any day now.
    Mar 19 12:08 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rich And Retired? Don't Buy Dividend Stocks [View article]
    Is the author's rich friend aware of Seeking Alpha? Will he read the comments posted here? In my opinion they provide better solutions to the "problem."
    Mar 13 01:38 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Ares Capital: The Titan Of The BDC Industry [View article]
    Thanks for the article and the insight into the matter of issuing addt'l shares to raise capital.
    Mar 7 11:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Breakup Story: High Yielding Rayonier Is Going To Be A Breakout [View article]
    Thanks for the article. I'm long and looking forward to the spin off.

    You said:

    "Rayonier is compared to real estate investment trusts and is an international forest products company..."

    Rayonier IS a REIT. Some might be confused by the "compared to" part of your statement. Nitpicky, I know but when I read that I thought, wait a minute...
    Mar 4 11:10 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Must-Know News [View article]
    gggl: EIC is alive and well in my opinion. It is already doing what you suggest: augmenting low paying jobs. Someone with 3 children can get 6000+ just from EIC. Add in the refundable Additional Child Tax Credit and they're looking at a substantial increase in their hourly earnings.

    But wait, there's more.

    People getting this credit often also get food stamps, housing assistance and "state medical" for the children. There is no means test on this assistance that affects the EITC payout. The program works as is. Maybe too well considering the amount of fraud that exists. These comments are based on my experience at tax prep, working with people who get the credits mentioned here.
    Mar 4 10:54 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
172 Comments
303 Likes